Tag Archive | Architect

Eye On Design: Cane Side Chair By Marcel Breuer

Breuer Chair Installation View
Installation View with Eames Shelving Unit (All Photo By Gail)

This side char was the product of a team research project led by Marcel Breuer (19021981), a celebrated architect and émigré known for his tubular metal furniture, and designer of the original Whitney Museum Building on Madison Avenue in NYC. Collaborating with the US Forest Products Laboratory, he applied knowledge accumulated over fifteen years of experimentation, as well as new developments in high-frequency gluing, to plywood construction.

Breuer Chair

The team’s report boasted of the chair’s ability to carry a load of five hundred pounds, and the jury of MoMA’s International Competition for Low-Cost Furniture described the design ad “ingeniously articulated.”

Breuer Cane Chair

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit The Value of Good Design, on Through June 15th, 2019 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Breuer Cane Chair

Eye On Design: Scented 3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes
All Photos By Gail

Inside this glass dome are vessels printed from sugar. The dome has an indented opening, inviting museum visitors to take a whiff of the objects inside; and yes, they smelled like Cotton Candy.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

These pieces were designed by architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello in Oakland, California. The team use 3D printing processes to invent forms with unique tactile qualities.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The two pink candy dishes have rough, grainy surfaces. The first dish resembles a stack of bubbles. At the top, half of one bubble serves as a lid.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The second is a footed, rimmed bowl with a cone-shaped lid, which sits displayed separate from its base.

Photographed as Part of the Emerging Objects Exhibit at The Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

Eye On Design: Poltrona Bowl Chair By Lina Bo Bardi

Poltrona Bowl Chair
All Photos By Gail

Valuing geometric simplicity and economy of means, Lina Bo Bardi (1914 – 1992) designed the Poltona Bowl Chair with a steel frame and stackable seat containing two circular cushions.

Poltrona Bowl Chair

The shell on the metal ring can be adjusted in all directions to suit the position of the sitter. Bo Bardi, who emigrated from Italy to Brazil in 1946, played a lead role in advancing modernist architecture and design in postwar Brazil. Among the landmark buildings she designed was her Sao Paulo home, the Glass House (Casa de Vidro) which she furnished with Poltrona Bowl Chairs.

Poltrona Bowl Chair

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC, where it is on display for the first time as part of the exhibit, Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, on view through August 13th, 2017.

Eye On Design: Malitte Lounge Furniture By Roberto Matta

Malitte Lounge Furniture
Photo By Gail

Primarily known as a painter and architect, Roberto Matta (1911 – 2002) designed his Malitte Lounge Furniture in 1966. This colorful collection of polyurethane foam shapes (manufactured by Gavina, Italy) could be stacked into a rectangular wall or used as individual pieces of seating. The round, center piece serves as a table. The design is playful and flexible, Its interlocking organic shapes reflect Matta’s training as an architect in his native Chile, as well as his Surrealist painting practice, which developed after his move to Paris.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Malitte Seating System

Below, Malitte Lounge Furniture Poster Photographed in December 2019

Malitte Lounge Furniture Poster By Gail Worley

Frank Gehry’s IAC Building

IAC Building
All Photos By Gail

The IAC Building, which is the headquarters for InterAcive Corp, sits on the Hudson River-facing lot on Eleventh Avenue between 18th and 19th Streets. I sometimes pass it when I am gallery hopping and when it is lit up at night it is quite breathtaking to behold.

IAC Building Screens

Besides the fact that the building itself is one of the most gorgeous examples of modern architecture in Manhattan, I am also quite charmed by the block-long series of video screens in the building’s lobby, which are visible from Eleventh Avenue. The visuals change all the time, but on a night last fall I snapped few photos of this pink and green set of abstract images.

IAC Building Screens Detail

When you get up close to the glass, you can see it is imbedded with little black dots, which I imagine help to shade the interior and add a dimension of privacy during the day.

IAC Building Facade Detail

I love this building.

IAC Building in the Snow
Seen from Eleventh Avenue Looking North in Winter, 2015

IAC Summer 2015
Seen from the High Line, Summer 2015

IAC Building 19th Street Side, Late September 2015
19th Street Side, Late September of 2015

IAC Building at Night

View from 20th Street Looking South, October 2016

IAC Building

Seen from the High Line in March of 2018

IAC Building from the Water

Seen from the middle of the Hudson River in July of 2018!

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Architect Zaha Hadid’s Sports Stadium Design Looks Like a Vagina

Zaha Hadid Vagina Stadium
Image Source

London-based Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid has been forced to defend herself against claims that her design for Qatar’s Al-Wakrah stadium, which is being built for the 2022 football World Cup, is based on the female genitalia, after images of the “vagina stadium” went viral two weeks ago.

The architect insists that the building’s swollen flaps, which part along the roof to frame a central ovoid opening, were inspired by the sails of local dhow sailing boats, but others have ridiculed their labial similarities. The Daily Show ran images of the stadium sprouting a forest of pubic hair, describing Hadid as “the Georgia O’Keeffe of things you can walk inside” and sent its sports correspondent to find the clitoral “press box” in vain. Hee!

In support of the argument that it looks like Lady parts, I will offer that it also closely resembles This. In the meantime, if there’s grass on the field, play ball!

Frank Lloyd Wright Inspired Cake

Frank Lloyd Wright Cake By Creative Cakes
Image Source

Beautiful, Architecturally Sound and Delicious.

Mies van der Rohe Google Doodle!

Google Doodle Honoring Mies Van De Rohe

German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was born on this day, March 27th, in 1886. As a member of the Bauhaus design school, Mies (as he was called) was highly influential in shifting modern architecture away from the ornate to the simple, a design philosophy from which he popularized the phrase “Less is More.” Mies is honored by today’s Google Doodle, which depicts the SR Crown Hall in Chicago, one of his glass-and-steel designs. Happy Birthday, Mies!

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House in LEGOs

Click on Image to Enlarge for Detail

I am a big fan of the work of maverick architect Frank Lloyd Wright; this much is no secret. When I was in Chicago in the Spring of 2010, I had the chance to take the train out to the suburb of Oak Park, where I toured Wright’s own family home and studio as well as a dozen or so other residences designed by Wright that still exist in that neighborhood. Wow, what a cool way to spend an afternoon is all I can say. Frank Lloyd Wright! Sadly, I did not get to see the Robie House – which resides in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood – because it was undergoing renovation at the time. Built in 1910 for Frederic Robie, a bicycle and motorcycle manufacturer, this home was one of the first houses to be turned into a national landmark. Now, LEGO has released a replica kit of Frank Lloyd Wright’s 101-year-old masterpiece. Because, how could they not? The LEGO Robie House, designed by Adam Reed Tucker, includes 2,276 pieces and is now available directly from LEGO at This Link for just $199!

Thanks to Gizmodo For The Tip!

Frank Lloyd Wright: From Within Outward

wrightfallingwater
“The space within becomes the reality of the building.” Fallingwater House in Winter,
(Located in Bear Run, Pennsylvania)

Anybody who knows dick about architecture knows that Frank Lloyd Wright was a mysterious genius. The Guggenheim museum here in NYC (which Wright designed) currently has an amazing retrospective of his projects – both built and unrealized – including plans, drawings, schematics, models and photographs of structures that would just crack your skull wide open with their awesomeness. Geoffrey and I saw the Guggenheim show a few weeks ago and I am still having dreams about his houses. I mean, have you ever seen pictures of the Fallingwater House? Can you even believe something like that exists? Talk about an artist who was light years a head of his time.

The Frank Lloyd Wright exhibit runs through August 23rd, 2009 at the Guggy, located uptown at 89th and Fifth Avenue, across from Central Park.