Tag Archive | Beau Stanton

Beau Stanton LoMan Arts Festival Mural, East Village NYC

Beau Stanton Mural East Village
Photos By Gail

This vibrant three-story mural was completed by artist Beau Stanton in August 2015 as part of the LoMan Arts Festival. If you’re thinking of adding it to your next Urban Art Safari, be advised that it stands on private property, in the courtyard of the Project Renewal Men’s Shelter, located at 30 East 3rd Street (between 2nd Ave and Bowery) in the East Village. You can try sneaking in if the gate is open (as we did), but their security guards don’t give a shit if you know the artist, just love the art or whatever. Just saying.

Beau Stanton Mural East Village

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Calm Before The Storm: Featuring the Art of Logan Hicks and Beau Stanton

Beau Stanton
Art By Beau Stanton (All Photos By Gail)

Here’s a Must See Art exhibit that features new works by two New York-based artists — Logan Hicks and Beau Stanton — who should be Art World Superstars any second now.  Curated by Lori Zimmer and Natalie KatesCalm Before the Storm, the two person show which opened this past Saturday at the Highline Loft, takes inspiration from nautical superstition, flood myths, classical paintings, life changing events and the modern issue of rising seas.

Beau Stanton

Stanton and Hicks have created new paintings, multiples, and a site-specific installations for this fantastic show. A special print release party with 1xRun will take over the space on October 22nd and, in honor of Halloween, the show will conclude with a costume party, Sailors, Sirens and Sea Hags, in honor of maritime folklore, on October 28th.

Logan Hicks
Art By Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks‘ interpretation of Calm Before the Storm fuses the photorealistic stencil artist’s interest in nautical traditions with the implications surrounding the serenity felt before major life changing events. With a foot planted in acceptance of fate, Hicks‘ new works reflect both traditional imagery and modernity, such as the role of and reliance upon technology as our means of communication — which has created an impersonal barrier when receiving news both good and bad. For Hicks, the works in the exhibition examine the driving force of fate, and the inability to alter momentum, via paintings, aerosol on canvas, aerosol on panel and editions of aerosol on paper.

Beau Stanton Captain's Study
Captain’s Study By Beau Stanton

Through oil painting, sculptural works and multiples, Beau Stanton’s take on the exhibit’s theme meshes the artist’s long-time interest in nautical lore, relating the storied takes of deluge myths and divine retribution to the current concerns with global climate change and rising waters. Like Hicks, Stanton takes influence from classical painting and sculpture, weaving ancient superstitions with modern environmental realities.

Here are some of our favorite pieces from the show!

Captain's Study Detail
Beau Stanton, Captain’s Study (Detail). The exhibition and installation is set to an original score by Luv Jonez.

Beau Stanton

Beau Stanton

This piece is huge, and I left a bit of the floor in the shot so you can see the scale. Beau Stanton’s work — which I have been following for about five years — is just crazy great, and not only is he a phenomenally talented artist, but he is also a genuinely nice and gracious person. Stanton is supportive of the work of other artists, as I see him all the time at other gallery openings, and he remembers my name and is always friendly and nice when we run into each other. Considering how few people I write about can even be bothered to retweet a link, Beau’s appreciation of the importance of press is invaluable to bloggers like me. His work will always be welcome for coverage at The Gig.

Beau Stanton

These pieces are all priced-to-own, and all collectors should be snatching them up immediately.

Beau Stanton Ship

Stanton also built a ship inside the gallery.

Beau Stanton Ship

Beau Stanton Ship Detail

Beau Stanton Ship Porthole

Each side of the ship has a porthole with a Steam Punk-esque animated video playing inside it. Check that out in the video below:

Seriously cool!

Logan Hicks
Art By Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks is an artist whose work I was first encountered through shows at the late Opera Gallery on Spring Street.

Logan Hicks

His work is very beautiful dark, and romantic. It always sets a mood.

Logan Hicks

This grid of paintings on canvas, which are being sold as individual works, includes many multiples and variations of the same image.  However, it seems a shame to break up the set.

Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks

(Click on Image to Enlarge for Detail)

This piece by Hicks is just insanely great. I recognized the location immediately as the platform at the Chambers Street stop on the J and Z trains. I have long referred to this station the “Jacob’s Ladder Subway Station” (for reasons that will be obvious to anyone familiar with the film) and the fact the Hicks chose to use this ultra-creepy, real life location as the setting for a gaggle of identical Harpies from Hell encircling a woman who is, seemingly obliviously, using her smart phone, lets me know that we are of the same mind. Well played.

Logan Hicks

I watch a lot of horror moves and this painting reminds me of the excellent vampire film, Only Lovers Left Alive. I recommend you see it.

Calm Before The Storm, Featuring the Artwork of Logan Hicks and Beau Stanton, will run through October 28th, 2015 at the Highline Loft, Located at 508 W 28th St, 5th floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Calm Before the Storm Signage

Last Rites Gallery 5 Year Anniversary Show!

Anima Pemumbra 4 by Menton3
Anima Pemumbra 4 by Menton3 (All Photos By Gail, Click on Any Image to Enlarge for Detail)

Things got dark and scary at Last Rites Gallery, as they are wont to do, at Saturday night’s opening reception for the Gallery’s Fifth Anniversary group show. Of course, dark and scary is how we like it at Last Rites, a gallery dedicated to exhibiting Horror Themed art and surrealist / pop art that falls to the right of the macabre.

Dead General By Esao Andrews
Dead General By Esao Andrews

Curated by Gallery Director (and freelance photographer) Derek Storm, this collection features paintings, sculptures, drawings and mixed media works by over forty artists, including a selection of Last Rites‘ roster of represented artists such as Chris Mars, Jason D’Aquino, Chet Zar, Beau Stanton and the legendary HR Giger.

Sculpture By HR Giger
Birth Machine Baby Bronze Sculpture By HR Giger

Deep Rising By Colin Christiann
Deep Rising By Colin Christian

Colin Christian has a beautiful sculpture in the show and his equally talented wife, Sas Christian has contributed a painting, below, that to me looks a lot like actress Naomi Watts.

The Fear By Sas Christian
The Fear By Sas Christian

Mark Kostabi and Gail Worley
Mark Kostabi and Me

Mark Kostabi was there! It is always fun to see Mark, he is so nice and such a charmer!

How About a Refill by Mark Kostabi
How About a Refill? by Mark Kostabi

It is not very challenging to pick out Mark’s contribution to the show. His style is extremely distinctive.

Drowning Salvation by Matt Dangler
Drowning Salvation by Matt Dangler

I liked this one a lot.

Last Rites Gallery Painters

These two artists created this paint during the exhibit. I guess that qualifies it as “Performance Art.”

Red King By Michael Hussar
Red King By Michael Hussar

This very fun and diverse exhibit will be up until May 18th, 2013, so be sure and make a trip over to Last Rites at 511 West 33rd Street while you can!

Poor & Stoned Diptych By Jason D'Aquino
Poor & Stoned Diptych By Jason D’Aquino

Shagadelic Baby! Shag’s Thursday’s Girl Comes to Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Thursdays Girl By Shag
Thursday’s Girl by Shag (All Photos By Gail, Click on Any Image to Enlarge)

Retro-Modern Design, Tiki Bar Culture, Cocktail Parties and Vinyl Records. Everything fabulous and swingin’ that made the late sixties and early seventies the best time to be alive are reoccurring themes in Thursday’s Girl, the new series of paintings by artist Josh Agle, known as Shag, on exhibit now at Jonathan LeVine Gallery.

Shag Party Scene

Couple Detail from Party Scene by Shag
Detail from Party Scene, Above. Notice that the men in this painting have horns on their heads. I will let you figure out what that is supposed to mean

There’s a party — or party vibe — of some kind going on in nearly every painting: whether it’s a large gathering of hedonistic revelers, the exterior shot of the house inside which the party is happening, or simply Thursday’s Girl shown playing her guitar as she relaxes with a martini and her cat.

Girl Guitar and CatCat Detail By Shag

Each painting has a  QR code next to it which, when scanned, will tell you something cool and informative about what is going on in the painting. I couldn’t read these little secret stories, however, because I have no smart phone. Don’t forget to bring your Smart Phones!

Key Party in the Cul De Sac
Painting Detail. There is probably a Key Party going on inside this house.

If you read the official Press Release on Thursday’s Girl, you will learn that “this series of paintings were inspired by All Tomorrow’s Parties, the classic Velvet Underground song in which lyrics written by Lou Reed spoke to New York’s downtown art scene found in places such as Warhol’s Factory.” The underlying theme turns out to be kind of a bummer — like a visual depiction of Poison’s “Fallen Angel,” if you will — but I didn’t want to focus on that. To me, these paintings were like a cross between Disneyland and Mad Men — two of my favorite things in the world. So, I choose to remain ignorant of their darker meaning.

Sixites Band By Shag

I think we can agree that this is supposed to be the Velvet Underground.

And the party was not just going on within the art. As the minutes ticked on, Saturday’s opening reception turned into quite the social scene. I was very happy to run into artists Beau Stanton and also Joseph Arthur, whose current exhibit is still up at Able Fine Art. Party at Jonathan LeVine!

Party Scene 2 By Shag

Party Scene 2 with Girl Detail By Shag

You should definitely go see this exhibit while you can, because it is just amazing. Shag Rocks!

Thursday’s Girl By Shag will be on Exhibit through May 4th, 2013  at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Girl on Sofa By Shag

Girl on Vespa by Shag

Bold Hype Gallery Presents Archaic Ornaments By Beau Stanton

Archaic Ornaments Exhibit Bold Hype Gallery
Foreground Painting: The Reclamation, Oil on Canvas By Beau Stanton (All Images Courtesy of Bold Hype Gallery)

Local Surrealist painter Beau Stanton has been an up-and-comer on the New York art scene for a few years now, gaining notoriety through his participation in various group shows on the way to achieving his first New York solo exhibit, up now at Bold Hype Gallery in Chelsea. Beau’s latest collection of paintings, presented under the name Archaic Ornaments, combines classical oil painting with his intricate silk-screened patterns “inspired by pre-modern architecture, letterpress printing designs and decayed infrastructure.” The details of the silk screens come into play especially on Stanton’s layered paintings, such as the series of skull images seen in the photo above, and they really need to be seen up close to be fully appreciated.

Archaic Ornaments Visceral Perception

Visceral Perception, seen above, is my favorite of the many skull images in the show, and I especially liked Stanton’s use of  “Flower Power” colors and the painting’s overall vibrancy. One of the cool things about Beau Stanton, besides his visionary artwork, is the fact that he is such a passionate fan of art in general and he’s enthusiastic in his support of the work of other artists. I see him out all the time at Gallery openings and he is always friendly and has an insight to share on what others are doing. Beau Stanton is an artist to watch, for sure. Make a point to see Archaic Ornaments while you can.

Archaic Ornaments Cyclops Polyphemus

Cyclops Polyphemus

Archaic Ornaments By Beau Stanton will be on Exhibit at Bold Hype Gallery, Located at  547 West 27th Street,  New York, NY 10001 through May 5th, 2012. Gallery Hours are Noon – 5:00 PM, Tuesday – Saturday.

Archaic Ornaments Erythrean Sibyl

Erythrean Sibyl

 

Jonathan Levine Gallery Presents Josh Keyes’ Migration


Stampede By Josh Keyes

One of last night’s hot-ticket gallery openings was the debut of Portland-based artist Josh Keyes’ new show, Migration, at Jonathan Levine in Chelsea. Migration features a series of paintings on panel, study drawings on paper and a ten-foot canvas entitled Stampede (See above), which is the artist’s largest painting to date.

On the subject of his show title, Keyes offers, “Migration and displacement were ideas that continued to surface in my mind while I was painting these images. I was thinking about the effects of climate change and the way some ecosystems that thrive in a specific range of temperatures — like polar or tropical climates —are experiencing a shrinking of their boundaries. Ecosystems that were separate are now slowly merging and overlapping one another, causing disruptions in the food web and increased competition for food and space among species. Some become displaced and are forced to migrate, in order to survive.”

Levine’s exhibit Press Release continues that: Keyes’ imagery in this exhibition pushes the potential consequences of ecosystem clashing to a climax that wavers on the surreal. A bright orange tiger rests contently on top of a graffiti covered dumpster, staring intensely at a pack of wolves, scavenging whitetail deer scraps from the tiger’s morning hunt. Below the smooth floodwater surface, glides a great white shark. A pair of giant pandas, marooned on a submerged jeep, watch with curiosity as the shark’s fin circles by. Deer, elk, wolves and other animals form a stampeding herd, charging through a city street, leaving upturned cars and ruptured pavement in their frenzied wake.


The Artist with His Work

I liked the way Keyes’ paintings encourage imaginative extrapolation in the viewer while combining visual beauty with a sense of foreboding and dread. The story they hint at reminded me a bit of a film I saw not too long ago called The Last Winter, which I highly recommend adding to your Netflix queue. Something I had not seen before at a gallery opening was a formal, organized line of fans waiting to meet Josh, that snaked through Levine’s rear gallery – a line which I waited in for 20 minutes just so I could say Hi to Josh and get him to sign one of his cards. Josh was super nice and took the time to meet and sign stuff for everyone who was waiting – very cool! Also spotted in the packed gallery were notable local artists Michael Fumero, Beau Stanton and Dima Drjuchin, all of whom appeared to be really digging the show. You can read more about Josh Keyes and see additional pictures from the exhibit at This Link.

Josh Keyes’ Migration Runs through November 19, 2011 at the Jonathan Levine Gallery, located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor (West of 10th Avenue) in New York. Gallery Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 AM to 6 PM.

Dark Pop 3.0 Opens at Last Rites Gallery

The third installment of Last Rites Gallery’s annual group exhibition Dark Pop 3.0 kicked off this weekend in New York, with a gala opening party on Saturday night. This show brings together eighteen intriguing pieces from a diverse group of artists, whose work is at least somewhat synonymous with a pop art aesthetic within their various genres. With Last Rites being known for its consistently thematically dark collections, participants were given a guideline to err on the darker end of their aesthetic, with truly remarkable results!

The Autumn Kings by Brian Despain

I always love attending shows at Last Rites because I enjoy the combination “House of Horrors” meets Fine Art vibe I get from the space, which is also a tattoo parlor owned by renowned artist, Paul Booth. It also seems that Popaganda artist Ron English – whom Geoffrey and I both adore – often shows up for opening parties. Ron was there on Saturday and it was fun to have a chance to speak with him in such an intimate setting, because Ron English is awesome. My favorite pieces in the exhibit are Brian Despain’s The Autumn Kings, Beau Stanton’s Gasp and Mark Garro’s very clever Serpentine Suppertime, which is accented with a custom frame that really sets the picture off. More photos from the opening can be seen over at According 2 G Dot Com at This Link.

Gasp by Beau Stanton

Dark Pop 3.0 Runs through February 12, 2011 at Last Rites Gallery, located at 511 West 33rd Street (West of 11th Ave) in NYC. Gallery Hours are Tues-Fri 2-9pm, Sat 2-9pm, Sun 2-6pm.

Serpentine Suppertime by Mark Garro