Tag Archives: photo realist

Modern Art Monday Presents: John By Chuck Close

john by chuck close photo by gail worley
Photo by Gail

Chuck Close is known as much for his detailed representation of the human face as he is for his subsequent deconstruction of it. Close uses head-on portraits as his templates, exploring portraiture and his subjects through a variety of drawing and painterly techniques, as well as through  printmaking, tapestry and photography.  John (197172) one of Close’s earliest paintings, is described as photo-realist. Indeed, Close refers to photographs to create his artworks, employing their inconsistencies perspective as much as their verisimilitude.

Here, the sharp detail of the rim of the subject’s glasses contrasts with the blurred soft focus of his shoulders and the back of his hair, as it likely did in the original photograph. But instead of using mechanical means to transfer his images onto canvas, Close works entirely from sight to achieve  the intensely animate detail, sectioning off the reference photographs into grids and transferring each piece by hand onto is monumental canvases,

Photographed at The Broad in Los Angeles, CA. 

Calm Before The Storm: Featuring the Art of Logan Hicks and Beau Stanton

Beau Stanton
Art By Beau Stanton (All Photos By Gail)

Here’s a Must See Art exhibit that features new works by two New York-based artists — Logan Hicks and Beau Stanton — who should be Art World Superstars any second now.  Curated by Lori Zimmer and Natalie KatesCalm Before the Storm, the two person show which opened this past Saturday at the Highline Loft, takes inspiration from nautical superstition, flood myths, classical paintings, life changing events and the modern issue of rising seas.

Beau Stanton

Stanton and Hicks have created new paintings, multiples, and a site-specific installations for this fantastic show. A special print release party with 1xRun will take over the space on October 22nd and, in honor of Halloween, the show will conclude with a costume party, Sailors, Sirens and Sea Hags, in honor of maritime folklore, on October 28th.

Logan Hicks
Art By Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks‘ interpretation of Calm Before the Storm fuses the photorealistic stencil artist’s interest in nautical traditions with the implications surrounding the serenity felt before major life changing events. With a foot planted in acceptance of fate, Hicks‘ new works reflect both traditional imagery and modernity, such as the role of and reliance upon technology as our means of communication — which has created an impersonal barrier when receiving news both good and bad. For Hicks, the works in the exhibition examine the driving force of fate, and the inability to alter momentum, via paintings, aerosol on canvas, aerosol on panel and editions of aerosol on paper.

Beau Stanton Captain's Study
Captain’s Study By Beau Stanton

Through oil painting, sculptural works and multiples, Beau Stanton’s take on the exhibit’s theme meshes the artist’s long-time interest in nautical lore, relating the storied takes of deluge myths and divine retribution to the current concerns with global climate change and rising waters. Like Hicks, Stanton takes influence from classical painting and sculpture, weaving ancient superstitions with modern environmental realities.

Here are some of our favorite pieces from the show!

Captain's Study Detail
Beau Stanton, Captain’s Study (Detail). The exhibition and installation is set to an original score by Luv Jonez.

Beau Stanton

Beau Stanton

This piece is huge, and I left a bit of the floor in the shot so you can see the scale. Beau Stanton’s work — which I have been following for about five years — is just crazy great, and not only is he a phenomenally talented artist, but he is also a genuinely nice and gracious person. Stanton is supportive of the work of other artists, as I see him all the time at other gallery openings, and he remembers my name and is always friendly and nice when we run into each other. Considering how few people I write about can even be bothered to retweet a link, Beau’s appreciation of the importance of press is invaluable to bloggers like me. His work will always be welcome for coverage at The Gig.

Beau Stanton

These pieces are all priced-to-own, and all collectors should be snatching them up immediately.

Beau Stanton Ship

Stanton also built a ship inside the gallery.

Beau Stanton Ship

Beau Stanton Ship Detail

Beau Stanton Ship Porthole

Each side of the ship has a porthole with a Steam Punk-esque animated video playing inside it. Check that out in the video below:

Seriously cool!

Logan Hicks
Art By Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks is an artist whose work I was first encountered through shows at the late Opera Gallery on Spring Street.

Logan Hicks

His work is very beautiful dark, and romantic. It always sets a mood.

Logan Hicks

This grid of paintings on canvas, which are being sold as individual works, includes many multiples and variations of the same image.  However, it seems a shame to break up the set.

Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks

(Click on Image to Enlarge for Detail)

This piece by Hicks is just insanely great. I recognized the location immediately as the platform at the Chambers Street stop on the J and Z trains. I have long referred to this station the “Jacob’s Ladder Subway Station” (for reasons that will be obvious to anyone familiar with the film) and the fact the Hicks chose to use this ultra-creepy, real life location as the setting for a gaggle of identical Harpies from Hell encircling a woman who is, seemingly obliviously, using her smart phone, lets me know that we are of the same mind. Well played.

Logan Hicks

I watch a lot of horror moves and this painting reminds me of the excellent vampire film, Only Lovers Left Alive. I recommend you see it.

Calm Before The Storm, Featuring the Artwork of Logan Hicks and Beau Stanton, will run through October 28th, 2015 at the Highline Loft, Located at 508 W 28th St, 5th floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Calm Before the Storm Signage

Jason Bryant’s Smoke & Mirrors At Porter Contemporary

Facade By Jason Bryant
Facade By Jason Bryant

Sick Kicks, Skate Decks and Old School Hollywood Glamour come together in Jason Bryant’s latest solo exhibit, up now at Porter Contemporary. Smoke and Mirrors is a cohesive exhibition of oil paintings – on unconventional media – through which the artist explores themes of loneliness, vulnerability and frailty.

A Crack in His Faux Fashion By Jason Bryant
A Crack in His Faux Fashion

The exhibit includes beautifully photo-realistically rendered film stills coupled with either his pixilation effects and/or details which appear to be inspired by both Skateboard and Tattoo culture. The juxtaposition of images is very cool and gives Bryant’s work a youthful, Pop Culture appeal while maintaining an air of sophistication. Smoke and Mirrors also includes a selection of custom skateboard decks, which are so hot right now, and custom painted sneakers.

Mirror Mirror By Jason Bryant
Mirror Mirror Painted Sneakers By Jason Bryant

This exhibit is lots of fun and highly recommended. Plus the people who work at Porter Contemporary are super nice, friendly and helpful should you have any questions about the art.

Assorted Skate Decks By Jason Bryant
Assorted Skate Decks

Skate Deck By Jason Bryant
Skate Deck Detail

Smoke and Mirrors by Jason Bryant will be on Exhibit Through October 20th, 2012 at Porter Contemporary, Located at 548 West 28th Street, 3rd Floor (Right Next to Joshua Liner Gallery), New York City. Gallery Hours are Tuesday & Wednesday by Appointment, Thursday 11:00 AM to 8:00 PM and Friday & Saturday 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Smoke & Mirrors By Jason Bryant
Painting Detail