Tag Archive | Andy Warhol

Eduardo Kobra’s Mount Rushmore of Art Mural, Chelsea Gallery District

Mount Rushmore of Art
All Photos By Gail

It’s hard to believe that Eduardo Kobra’s Mount Rushmore of Art mural has been up for five months already, and it took me that long to photograph it in its finished state; but that what I finally had the chance to do on Easter Sunday, when I went for walk on the High Line.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

Located at 10th Avenue and 22nd Street, directly above the often-shuttered-and-reopened Empire Diner, I happened to be in that neighborhood on November 3rd, 2018, while Kobra and his team worked on monumental piece, detailing the likenesses of four contemporary art legends: Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. I was able to take a few photos of the mural as a work-in-progress on the afternoon, so I thought it would be fun to share them alongside photos of the completed mural, which takes its name from the monument located in South Dakota, swapping out US Presidents for North American Artists.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

Finishing touches are added to the face of Keith Haring (19581990). Frida Kahlo’s beautiful face seems to be completed at this point. She lived from 1907 to 1954.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

Kobra works on the face of Andy Warhol (19281987). The Dollar Sign visible under Warhol’s likeness, which is a motif from his artworks, has been replaced in the finished mural by a dinosaur wearing crown: an image popularized by Basquiat, who was a disciple of Warhol.

Kobras Mt Rushmore In Progress

This mural was completed in  collaboration with HG Contemporary Gallery in NYC.

Mount Rushmore of Art

Mount Rushmore of Art

 

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Mao (1972), Andy Warhol

Mao
Photo By Gail

Andy Warhol based his Mao paintings, drawings, lithographs, photocopy prints, and wallpaper on the same image: a painting by Zhang Zhenshi that served as the frontispiece for Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung (known in the “West as The Little Red Book”) and was then thought to be the most widely reproduced artwork in the world. Warhol chose the image of Mao — then chairman of the Chinese Communist Party — after reading news coverage of President Richard Nixon’s trip to the People’s Republic of China in February of 1972, an unprecedented act of cold war diplomacy that marked the first act by a sitting American president to the nation, which at the tie was considered an enemy of the state.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again, at the Whitney Museum of American Art Through March 31st, 2019.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Andy Warhol, Mylar and Plexiglass Construction

Mylar and Plexiglass Construction
All Photos By Gail

A hybrid of Pop and Minimalist aesthetics, this stacked sculpture, Mylar and Plexiglass Construction (1970) relates to Andy Warhol’s Mylar Silver Clouds from 1966 and extends his interest in seriality, color and the readymade into three-dimensional space.

Mylar and Plexiglass Construction Detail

Mylar Rolls, Detail

Mylar and Plexiglass Construction Detail

Comprised of six rolls of colored mylar on cardboard tubes, mounted in a Plexiglass case, the work offers a rare glimpse into a mode of artistic production that, for whatever reason, Warhol chose not to pursue further.

Plexiglass and Mylar Construction

Mylar and Plexiglass Construction

Photographed as Part Of the Exhibit, Andy Warhol: From A to B And Back Again, at The Whitney Museum in NYC Through March 31, 2019.

Plexiglass and Mylar Construction

Psychedelic Christmas Tree Forest at The Standard Hotel

Colored Christmas Trees
All Photos By Gail

If you happen to be planning an outing to the Whitney Museum to see the new Andy Warhol exhibit, From A to B And Back Again, why not make a day of it: do some shopping, walk the High Line, enjoy a delicious lunch at Bubby’s, and stop by the outdoor Plaza at the Standard Hotel to check out their amazing Psychedelic Christmas Tree Forest!

Colored Christmas Trees

Colored Christmas Trees

As you can see, these trees are decorated with oversize sweets such as  Gummy Bears, Candy Canes and Gum Drops! Fun!

Colored Christmas Trees

Colored Christmas Trees

While you stroll among the trees and take assloads of selfies for your Instagram feed, you can also enjoy a hot beverage!

Find This Forest of Colorful Holiday Trees at The Standard Hotel Plaza, Located at 848 Washington at 13th Street, New York 10014

Colored Christmas Trees

Modern Art Monday Presents: Andy Warhol, Mona Lisa

Andy Warhol Mona Lisa
Photo By Gail

This Mona Lisa (1963) is one of the earliest works for which Andy Warhol employed silk-screening, the printing process that he adopted in 1962 to quickly and easily make multiple copies of preexisting images. Here, he revels in the rat of duplication. By replicating a reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci’s famous painting Mona Lisa four times in two different ways, the artist reduces a masterwork epitomizing traditional notions of artistic genius and authorship to a pale shadow of its former self. Warhol’s Mona Lisa was donated to The Met by his friend Henry Geldzahler, the Museum’s founding curator of contemporary art. One year before Geldzahler made his gift, Warhol released he film Henry Geldzahler, which consists solely of ninety-seven minutes of footage of the curator smoking a cigar.Photographed in The Met in NYC.

Photographed in The Met in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Fright Wig

Pink Fright Wig
All Photos By Gail

This bright Pink Wig, which I stopped to snap while walking south on 8th Avenue near Madison Square Garden, reminded me immediately of the  crazy, disheveled fright wig that Andy Warhol famously sported in his later years.  I’m picturing it on Andy’s head even as I type this.

Mane Beauty Supply Store Front

Spotted in the window of Mane Beautify Supply, located at 412 8th Avenue between 30th & 31st Streeta, New York, NY 10001.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Gee, Merrie Shoes from Bonwit Teller Window Display By Andy Warhol

Gee Merrie Shoes
Photo By Gail

The catalyst for Andy Warhol’s transformation from commercial to fine artist was a 1961 display window that he created for the Bonwit Teller Department Store at Fifth Avenue and 56th Street. The window displayed five of Warhol’s newest paintings  as a backdrop to mannequins wearing Bonwit’s fashions. Representing Warhol’s first foray into what would become Pop Art, these paintings depicted commercial imagery from ads and comics, overlaid with gestural drips and blotches of Abstract Expressionism. The Bonwit window introduced Warhol’s characteristic practice of elevating pop culture into fine art that he continued to explore for the rest of his career.

Photographed as part of the Gay Gotham Exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York.