Tag Archives: bronze sculpture

Eye on Design: Tiger Chimney By Jean-Marie Fiori

Chimney by Jean Marie Fiori Photo by Gail Worley
Photos By Gail Worley

Jean Marie Fiori is a French sculptor born in Limoges. He graduated from the National School of Fine Arts (École Nationale des Beaux-arts) in Paris, where he is now based. Formerly a painter, Fiori is devoted to sculpture and more specifically, to the representation of animals.  During the years, the artist/designer improved his mastery of bronze and enriched his imaginary bestiary of designed furniture and monumental installations. In 2010,  Fiori was selected by the Chinese Official Committee of World Expo in Shanghai to create a set of urban furniture consisting of five benches. Inspired by traditional Chinese symbols, he reinterpreted turtle, bull, tiger, buffalo and duck. Over time, he developed a language of plastic arts closer to that of the Decorative Arts. He transformed deer into chairs and falcons into tables, with a sense of humor and his own originality specific to his works. This Tiger Chimney / Fire Place in patinated bronze was produced in a signed and numbered edition of 8 plus 4 Artist Proofs. Inquire Here for pricing.

chimney installation view photo by gail worley
Installation View

Photographed at the Salon Art + Design 2019 in NYC.

Statue of Pink in The Financial District

Pink By Gillie and Marc
All Photos By Gail

While running errands on my lunch hour, I stumbled upon a set of ten larger-than-lifesize bronze statues of various women, who are easily recognizable as celebrities or otherwise influential public figures, which turned out to be part of Statues For Equality, a public art initiative by husband and wife artist team Gillie and Marc. Statues For Equality is a global mission to balance gender representation in public statues and honor women’s contribution to society. While the installation includes world-famous women such as Oprah Winfrey, Nicole KidmanJane Goodall, and Cate Blanchett, the figure that stood out for me the most was one of Pink, because, well, she’s a rock star! The plaque that can be seen to the right of each statue explains the many reasons for each woman’s inclusion in the project, and Pink’s has the following inscription:

“Twenty-first-century pop idol Pink is a three-time Grammy award winning singer and songwriter who has released seven studio albums, has 15 top ten singles, sold over 50 million albums worldwide, and sold out tours all over the world, making her one of the most widely respected and popular musicians across the globe.

Pink By Gillie and Marc
Installation View

As outstanding as she is influential, Pink received mass acclaim for her raw, honest, and subversive approach to pop music combined with her distinctive and commanding vocal performance that has inspired countless others to pick up a microphone and be themselves.

Outside of her highly decorated music career, Pink is a UNICEF Ambassador, an outspoken animal activist, LGBTQ advocate, and campaigner for women’s rights with a focus on body positivity and female representation.

Pink By Gillie and Marc

Standing tall in an Aster, a flower loved for its hardness and variety of blooming colors, Pink chose the Aster flower as a symbol of her diverse audience from around the world as well as her transformative career.

Pink By Gillie and Marc

Statues For Equality Can Currently Be Seen at 32 Old Slip in The Financial District, NYC, But It is Expected to Move On To Other Cities, So See These Fine Ladies While You Can!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Gun Magnet By Randall Harrington

Randall Harrington Gun Magnet Wool Tapestry
Photo By Gail

Randall Harrington’s Gun Magnet is but one example of the sculptor and painter’s statement work. Known for his high-concept fabrications of recomposed weaponry, Toastasaurus herds and eerily human robots, the Los Angeles-based artist found his niche in metal and mixed media after years of assisting big-name installation and performance artists working in film-set design. The Gun Magnet wool tapestry (2019, above) was inspired by the bronze sculpture (2014), seen below.

Gun Magnet Sculpture

Photographed as Part of Beyond The Streets in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Cone Fixing Cylinder By Tom Otterness

Cone Fixing Cylander
Photos By Gail

Do these guys look familiar to you? If you’ve ever spent any time in the subway station at 14th Street and Eighth Avenue, you will recognize them as being creations of Tom Otterness, the artist behind the Life Underground installation found in that popular transit hub.

While an adjacent plaque identifies the artwork as Cone Fixing Cylinder (2014), and references its home as the Marlborough Gallery, located at 40 West 57th Street, 2nd Floor, the sculpture is actually tucked away in an access passageway between two adjacent buildings, connecting 57th Street with 56th Street just east of Sixth Avenue. The corridor is home to perhaps a half dozen other sculptures from various aritist. Check it out when you are in the neighborhood!

Cone Fixing Cylander
“Let Me Help You With That…”

Subway Cop

Subway Cop
Photo By Gail

This tiny bronze MTA Policewoman sculpture was spotted on patrol above ground at the elevator to the A C E line at 14th Street and 8th Avenue. Art by Tom Otterness as part of his Life Underground series for MTA Arts & Design.

Head in My Hands

Head in My Hands
Photo By Gail

This is what I feel like at end of long and grueling week at the day gig. Here, we see that feeling manifested in bronze sculpture by artist Tom Otterness, as part of his urban fantasy sculpture series, Life Underground, found throughout the 8th Avenue and 14th Street Subway station in downtown Manhattan.

Telephone Sculpture, 8th Ave at 14th Street Subway Station

Tom Otterness Phone Sculpture
Photo By Gail

Life Underground is the name of a series of whimsical bronze sculptures by artist Tom Otterness, which have inhabited the 8th Avenue and 14th Street Subway Station since 2001. The sculptures can be found all along the platforms for the A, C and E Trains and also the L Train, as well as literally all over the station. This sculpture of an anthropomorphic pay telephone is installed on one side of a support beam on the Uptown A, C and E platform.