Tag Archives: colorful

Beauty in Banality: The Art of Jennifer Small

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All Images Courtesy of Robert Berry Gallery

Since the Chelsea galleries reopened a few months ago, there has not been much on exhibit that has compelled me to leave my house in order to see the art in person. I felt differently, however, when I received an email announcing an exhibit of new paintings from Wilmington, DE-based painter Jennifer Small. As soon as I saw her bold and colorful canvases featuring abstract shapes and patterns, they reminded me of the shaped, sculptural paintings by Beverly Fishman as well as the furniture designs of Shiro Kuramata. It delighted me to imagine what a line of art furniture from the mind of this artist might look like. I wanted to see these paintings in person right away. Sadly, I was informed that the show was viewable online only, but gallerist Robert Berry was kind enough ask Jennifer for a statement about her work exclusively for this post. Sweet.

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Detail of Work from Above Photo

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Beauty in Banality is about seeing everyday routine as an opportunity to absorb visual curiosities in situations or places that are often overlooked,” Jennifer explains. “I use abstraction to elevate these glimpses of ordinary environments into bold, engaging compositions that can live in a white cube gallery space but are still approachable and relatable because they are grounded in observations of common things.” It’s nice to know that I am not alone in having taken inspiration from my post-lockdown neighborhood walks.

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“The majority of the paintings in Beauty in Banality were made since the Covid-19 lockdown this past year,” she continues. “I was inspired by walking my dog around the block, witnessing caution tape around playgrounds and abandoned soccer fields. My paintings become a visual diary of my movements in a specific time and place.”

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Suggestive of the works of Thomas Nozkowski, Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park Series, and Wendy White, Small’s work often features a major focal point, as well as secondary items, creating visual interest with neutral areas juxtaposed with detailed patterning. Find out more about Jennifer Small, and see all of the fourteen works featured in the Beauty of Banality series, through January 10th 2021, by visiting  the Robert Berry Gallery.

Eye On Design: Bon Bon Acrylic Coffee Table By Marco Pettinari For Poliedrica

Poliedrica Booth ICFF
All Photos By Gail

This year’s ICFF has come and gone, but the moment I passed by the booth for Poliedrica, makers of sleek, candy-colored Plexiglas furniture, I knew I had found it: the Oh, Wow piece of the entire show! Ladies and gentlemen, may I present the Bon Bon Acrylic Coffee Table! Continue reading Eye On Design: Bon Bon Acrylic Coffee Table By Marco Pettinari For Poliedrica

Modern Art Monday Presents: Charring Cross Bridge By Andre Derain

Charring Cross Bridge
Photo By Gail

In this cityscape, Andre Derain (1880 – 1954) rendered the London sky with dramatic color. In the summer of 1905, he developed the bright palette of Charring Cross Bridge while painting alongside his elder peer, Henri Matisse in Coullioure, France. There, the two artists produced their most radical paintings to date — paintings purged of shadows and filled with imaginative, unbridled colors. When several of these works were exhibited in Paris that fall, the public and critics found the palette to be startling, and ridiculed their efforts. As Derain later recalled, “It was the era of photography. This may have influenced us, and played a part in our reaction against anything resembling a snapshot of life. Colors became charges of dynamite.”

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

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Eye On Design: ergoErgo Seating!

ergoErgo Booth at ICFF
ergoErgo Booth at ICFF, 2017 (All Photos By Gail)

Ergonomic seating has been a hot ticket item for decades now; but the ways in which designs continue to evolve keeps the field exciting and on trend! At ICFF 2017 we fell in love with the ergoErgo office seating, not only for its funky and functional modern design, but for its availability in a spectrum of vibrant colors to please a range of personal tastes!

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Sit On It

The ergoErgo chair invites you to sit dynamically. Evolution designed us to walk and run, to chase prey across the plans, to stalk in the forest, to crouch around a campfire. But to sit rigidly in a chair for extended periods of time? Not so much. Our bodies were made to move! Traditional chairs make our muscles passive and weak by locking the body into a rigid position. Today’s worldwide epidemic of aching backs, sore shoulders, and stiff necks is caused in great part by poor by sitting. People slump and slouch on rigid chairs in offices and classrooms. Many think that they have to live with a ‘bad back,’ but often they just need to sit correctly.

ErgoErgo Signage

When you in on an ergoErgo chair, you shift through a whole range of large and small movements. Your breathing deepens. Your blood circulates freely. Your spine twists gently, bringing fluid to the inter-vertebral discs. The abdominal muscles keep the body upright and supple.

ErgoErgo Presentation

Replacing even your considered-to-be ergonomic office chair with ergoErgo not only strengthen your core, but  it will also awaken your mind. ErgoErgo is intelligent design that every body can benefit from.

ErgoErgo Multicolored

Available in three sizes to fit both kids and adults, ergoErgo has won both the Edison Award and the Good Design award! And best of all, it retails for around $100! Find out more about ergoErgo at This Link!

Lynda Benglis: New Work, at Cheim & Read

Lynda Benglis New Works
All Photos By Gail

Since the 1960s, Lynda Benglis has been celebrated for the free, ecstatic forms she has poured, thrown and molded in ceramic, latex, polyurethane and bronze. In her new work, she turns to handmade paper, which she wraps around a chicken wire armature, often painting the sand-toned surface in bright, metallic colors offset by strokes of deep, coal-based black. At other times she leaves the paper virtually bare. Continue reading Lynda Benglis: New Work, at Cheim & Read