Tag Archive | Clothing

Avocado Heart T Shirt

Avocado Heart T Shirt Design
Images Courtesy of The Neatoshop

Do you love Avocados? I sure do. From Avocado Toast to Guacamole, I am all about the green, pear-shaped, buttery fruit. Yummy. If you feel similarly, why not show your love by wearing this Avocado Heart T Shirt, featuring an awesome design by Adrian Serghie, which is on sale for just $24.95, at This Link.

Avocado Heart T Shirt

Advertisements

Eye On Design: Unisex Jumpsuit By Rudi Gernreich

Unisex Jumpsuit
All Photos By Gail

In 1970, Life magazine invited Rudi Gernreich (1922 – 1985) to envision what people would wear a decade in the future. He extended his prediction to the year 2000, illustrating men and women in matching ensembles with heads either shaved or wigged. Unlike other contemporaneous unisex styles, Gernreich’s designs did not use menswear as a baseline for women’s garments. “Women will wear pants and men will wear skits interchangeably,” he predicted. “The aesthetics of fashion are going to involve the body itself. We will train the body to grown beautifully rather than cover it to produce beauty.”

Unisex Jumpsuit Magazine Ad

Gernreich brought his concept to life for the U.S. Pavillion’s Art and Technology Program at Expo ’70, a memorable World’s Fair in Osaka, Japan. He eliminated stylistic markers of gender on his models. “Our notion of masculine and feminine are being challenged as never before.” he asserted. “The basic masculine – feminine appeal is in people, not in clothes.” These sentiments are echoed today, as fashion continues to shift its understanding of gender as fluid.

Unisex Jumpsuits with Boots Installation View
Unisex Jumpsuits with White Boots, Installation View

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Items: Is Fashion Modern, on View Through January 28th, 2018 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara, A-POC Queen

APOC Queen
All Photos By Gail

Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara’s A-POC Queen (1997) is a textile generated from a single thread by a computer-programmed industrial knitting machine. The resulting openwork knit tube bears a repeating pattern of woven  seams that create a patchwork of shapes whose outlines suggest dresses, shirts, socks, gloves and hats. The customer can cut along the seams without destroying the tubular structure of each individual item, and virtually no material is wasted in the process of creating — without needle or thread — a complete monochromatic outfit from this single swath of cloth.

APOC Queen Detail

For Miyake, the A-POC technique is an extension of the technological advances begun during the Industrial Revolution, which ultimately made ready-to-wear clothing possible. While automation has made fashion more accessible in some respects, it has also fostered overconsumption and waste. A-POC, an acronym for “A Piece of Cloth,” is also a play on the word epoch, a call to all to look to the next century with a sense of responsibility. “Will fashion be able to afford to keep the same old methodology?” asks Miyake. “I have endeavored to experiment to make fundamental changes to the system of making clothes.”

APOC Queen

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Items: Is Fashion Modern, on View Through January 28th, 2018 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Get This T-Shirt for Halloween: The Most Wonderful Time of The Year!

Halloween Most Winderful Time-1

You love Halloween way more than Christmas, amiright? Sure I am. Get this rad Halloween T-Shirt that expresses how you truly feel about the darkest of all holidays for yourself for just $19.95 at This Link!

Eye On Design: Paco Rabanne Disc Dress Circa 1966

Paco Rabanne Dress 1966
All Photos By Gail

Paco Rabanne presented his first fashion collection in 1966. It was entitled 12 Dresses in Unwearable Materials and included garments made from links of plastic fastened with metal hoops. Rabanne had proven that fabric, needle and thread were not altogether necessary to clothing design, and he quickly gained fame for his defiance of tradition.

Paco Rabanne Dress 1966 Installation View

Ready-to-wear Dress Circa 1966: Silver and Black Plastic Discs, Metal Hoops. Photographed in the Museum at FIT in Manhattan.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Fashions From Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons Art of The In-Between at The Met!

Installation View
All Photos By Gail

Every year , the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts a fashion exhibit full of mind-blowing, ‘wearable’ works of art. We enjoy making multiple visits during each exhibit’s tenure, which generally lasts into late summer, and taking way too many photos than we will never do anything with. Because too may photos is a thing. and it is how we roll.

Pink Dress with Brace

For spring/summer 2017,  the Costume Institute’s exhibition examines the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme des Garçons (French for “Like Boys”), who is known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show features approximately 140 examples of Kawakubo’s womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection, many with heads and wigs created and styled by Julien d’Ys. 90% of the designs are just out of control, crazy couture that no one would ever wear anywhere but the runway, or one time only to a gala where you need to be remembered for wearing a dress that comes with its own cage, or something.

2 Pink Dresses

The galleries illustrate the designer’s revolutionary experiments in “in-betweenness”—the space between boundaries. Objects are organized into nine aesthetic expressions of interstitiality in Kawakubo’s work: Absence/Presence, Design/Not Design, Fashion/Anti-Fashion, Model/Multiple, Then/Now, High/Low, Self/Other, Object/Subject, and Clothes/Not Clothes. Kawakubo breaks down the imaginary walls between these dualisms, exposing their artificiality and arbitrariness.

Pink and Blue Dress

If you are intrigued by the Pink Presses in this post, which is how I was able to distill the exhibit for this blog, then you need to check this shit out in person, because it is just insane.

Flowered Dress

18th Century Punk Installation View

18th Century Punk
18th Century Punk,  Autumn/Winter 2016 – 2017

Look: Proof that this ‘dress’ fits on a human body!

18th Century Punk

Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons Art of The In-Between Runs Through September 4th, 2017 at The Met, NYC.

Save

Eye On Design: Acid Test Dress and Boots By Gretchen Fetchen

Acid Test Dress and Boots
All Photos By Gail

Paula Douglas, also known as Gretchen Fetchen, was one of the early participants in the San Francisco Acid Test  happenings organized by Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters in the mid-1960s. The events were designed as gatherings to promote consciousness expansion and creativity through the use of LSD, which was legal at the time.

Gretchen Fetchen’s Acid Test Dress (1965) and painted Orange Leather Boots reflects the Merry Pranksters’ rejection of norms of appearance through the embracing of exuberant Day-Glo colors. The garment also features a star, together with red, white and blue stripes — symbols of the Merry Pranksters.

Acid Test Dress and Boots Installation View

Acid Test Dress and Boots Installation View. Photographed as Part of the Counter Couture Exhibit, Up Though August 20th, 2017 at the Museum of Arts and Design in NYC