Tag Archive | Manus x Machina

Eye On Design: 3D Printed Orange Lace Dress By Iris van Herpin

3D Printed Orange Dress
All Photos By Gail

This dress, part of Dutch designer Iris van Herpin’s Autumn 2102 haute couture collection, was 3D printed using a process called Stereolithography. It was built layer by layer in a vessel of liquid polymer. The polymer hardens when struck by a laser beam. This technique allows for more texture and transparency than selective laser sintering. Graphic and organic elements come together to evoke dimensional lacework.

Fabricated from ark orange epoxy by Materialise, hand-sanded and hand-sprayed with a technical transparent resin, this is the second 3D printed dress by van Herpin to be featured as part of this blog’s Eye On Design series.

3D Printed Orange Dress

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as Part of the Manus X Machina Fashion Exhibit, which has Now Closed.

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Pink Thing of The Day: Wedding Ensemble By Yves Saint Laurent

Wedding Ensemble By YSL
All Photos By Gail

This whimsical Wedding Ensemble from the Yves Saint Laurent Summer/Spring 1999 prêt–à–porter collection consists of two well positioned wreaths of flowers: a bikini-like bra top and hip-hugging bottom with a long train attached. For the confident bride!

Wedding Ensemble By YSL Detail

While this design may seem a bit over-the-top for a traditional ceremony (and for any bride lacking a perfect model’s physique) there is no denying that the result is completely visually captivating. Accessories include a Bridal head wreath, bracelet and anklet all adorned with the same handmade pink and gold silk flowers and leaves (by Lemarie) that are also found on the top and bottom. The Train is machine-sewn pink silk gazar. Gazar is a silk (or wool) plain weave fabric made with high-twist double yarns woven as one. Gazar has a crisp hand and a smooth texture, and is often used in bridal and evening fashion due to its ability to hold its shape.

Wedding Ensemble Shoes and Anklet

Wedding Ensemble By YSL

Photographed the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Manus X Machina Fashion Exhibit in the Summer of 2016.

Eye On Design: Flying Saucer Dress By Issey Miyake

Flying Saucer Dress
All Photos By Gail

The Flying Saucer Dress from Miyake Design Studio (Spring/Summer 1994, prêt-à-porter collection) represents a continuation of Japanese fashion design legend Issey Miyake’s exploration of pleating garments with a playful element. He explains, “The Flying Saucer was a search for what could be done with different sorts of pleating — in this case, accordion pleats  — and to see what could be done by combining fabric, design and movement. Why not make brightly-colored, wearable accordion?”

Flying Saucer Dress Flat
Flying Saucer Dress, Flat (Detail)

The dress is made from machine-sewn polychrome polyester plain weave, and is machine-garment-pleated.

Flying Saucer Dress Expanded
Flying Saucer Dress, Expanded (Detail)

Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Manus x Machina Fashion Exhibit in the Summer of 2016.

Flying Saucer Dress

Eye On Design: 3D Printed Bone Dress By Iris van Herpen

Bone Dress
All Photos By Gail

This dress is 3-D printed, and the 3-D file was developed by designer Iris van Herpen along with architect Isaie Bloch. The file-making took two months of intense drawing and a full week of printing in a very sophisticated machine. According to van Herpen, “People often think that when you create something by machine, it is perfect, but this dress is a good example of the opposite. While the dress was printing, many small ‘faults’ happened because of the intense heating of the material. This makes the bones irregular, and makes it look even more real.”

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as Part of the Manus X Machina Fashion Exhibit, which has Now Closed.

Bone Dress Installation View

Top Ten Favorite Photos from the Manus x Machina Fashion Exhibit at The Met

Manus Machina Signage
All Photos By Gail

There’s only one drawback when The Met allows photography at one of their fashion exhibits, and that is that I have way too many great photos to choose from, and simply cannot distill the show down to a single blog post. So, it’s extremely fortunate — for me, for you —  that Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, which has been up since May, was extended to September 5th, 2016, or I’d once again be scrambling to throw something together a day before the show ends.

Just to get you up to speed, the Costume Institute’s spring 2016 exhibition explores how fashion designers are reconciling the handmade and the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and avant-garde ready-to-wear. With more than 170 ensembles dating from the early 20th century to the present, the exhibition addresses the founding of the haute couture in the 19th century, when the sewing machine was invented, and the emergence of a distinction between the hand (manus) and the machine (machina) at the onset of mass production. Manus x Machina explores this ongoing dichotomy, in which hand and machine are presented as discordant tools in the creative process, and questions the relationship and distinction between haute couture and ready-to-wear.

I managed to cull ten favorite images — plus one bonus image — for this post. Enjoy!

Shimmering Dresses
Various Designs in Sequined and Metallic Finishes

Alexander McQueen
(Left) Boué Soeurs, Court Presentation Ensemble, 1928. (Right) Designs by Alexander McQueen

Hussein Chalayan Floating DressHussein Chalayan Floating Dress
Hussein Chalayan, Floating Dress

Alexander McQueen
Feathered Cape and Dress By Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen and Iris Van Herpin
Designs by Alexander McQueen and Iris van Herpen

House of Dior
Pleated Skirts by House of Dior

Miyake Design Studio
Miyake Design Studio

Mariano Fortuny
Designs by Mariano Fortuny

Madame Gres and Iris Van Herpin
Designs by Madame Gres (Alix Barton, Rear) and Iris van Herpen (Front)

Commes De Garcons
Designs by Commes De Garçons

And here’s your bonus image:
Three Dresses

Don’t you want to go right now? Better hurry, you’ve got about three more weeks!

Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, will be on Exhibit at The Met Fifth Avenue in Galleries 955, 961–962 and 964–965 Through September 5th, 2016!