Tag Archives: 1971

Modern Art Monday Presents: Wadsworth A. Jarrell, Revolutionary (Angela Davis)

angela davis photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Wadsworth Jarrell’s Revolutionary (Angela Davis) (1971) is one of the most recognized paintings associated with the Black Arts Movement, a cultural manifestation of the Black Power Movement. Artists of this movement sought to create uplifting images that called upon Black people to harness their collective power.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: John By Chuck Close

john by chuck close photo by gail worley
Photo by Gail

Chuck Close is known as much for his detailed representation of the human face as he is for his subsequent deconstruction of it. Close uses head-on portraits as his templates, exploring portraiture and his subjects through a variety of drawing and painterly techniques, as well as through  printmaking, tapestry and photography.  John (197172) one of Close’s earliest paintings, is described as photo-realist. Indeed, Close refers to photographs to create his artworks, employing their inconsistencies perspective as much as their verisimilitude.

Here, the sharp detail of the rim of the subject’s glasses contrasts with the blurred soft focus of his shoulders and the back of his hair, as it likely did in the original photograph. But instead of using mechanical means to transfer his images onto canvas, Close works entirely from sight to achieve  the intensely animate detail, sectioning off the reference photographs into grids and transferring each piece by hand onto is monumental canvases,

Photographed at The Broad in Los Angeles, CA. 

Modern Art Monday Presents: Joan Snyder, Hard Sweetness (From the Stroke Series)

Hard Sweetness

Hard Sweetness (1971) is one of Joan Snyder’s Stroke paintings, a series in which abstract imagery and mark-making register personal and political struggles and decisions. Snyder began making art in the late 1960s, a time when men dominated the art world. Her sensibility and style were inspired by feminism, music, Expressionism, and her own life experience, as well as dislike of the distilled macho aesthetics of Minimalism.

Hard Sweetness uses strokes of paint in soft stains, loose washes, and thicker scumbling ( applying a very thin coat of opaque paint to give a softer or duller effect) to create rhythmic, almost musical passages of color across the canvas. As the title of this work suggests, Snyder blurs the distinction between the senses of sight, taste and perhaps even sound and smell. Like her contemporary Eva Hesse, she balances a feminine palette with a muscular formal complexity.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in Manhattan.

1971 De Tomaso Pantera Owned By Elvis Presley

De Tomaso Pantera
All Photos By Gail

Elvis Presley, who had a passion for both cars and guns, shot this Pantera with his personal firearm during a temperamental outburst, losing patience when the car would not start. The two bullet holes on the steering wheel rim and one in the floor pan were never repaired and today serve as reminders of his occasional fits of rage. Continue reading 1971 De Tomaso Pantera Owned By Elvis Presley

RIP Roger Prigent, Photographer of Love It To Death Album Cover

Alice Cooper Love it to Death
Original, Banned Cover With Alice’s Thumb Emulating a Penis

Photographer and renowned antique dealer, Roger Prigent, who snapped the infamous cover of 1971’s Love it to Death, the breakthrough third album by the band Alice Cooper, has passed away on December 15th, 2012, at the age of 89.

Primarily known for his fashion photography, Prigent became a prominent Manhattan antiques dealer when his eyesight began to fail three decades ago. Prigent died in New York City on Saturday, December 15th, 2012 after suffering a recent stroke that left him in a coma. Read more about Roger Prigent’s life and career at This Link.