Tag Archive | The Hole

Not a Painting Group Show at The Hole

Adam Parker Smith, Charlatan
Adam Parker Smith, Charlatan, 2015 (All Photos By Gail)

The Hole gallery can be hit (Holton Rower, André Saraiva) or miss (Jim Joe) with its single artist exhibits, but it tends to get it right when curating a group show where work by multiple artists follows a common theme, and they deserve high fives all around for Not a Painting, a vibrant new group show which opened on Tuesday, June 9th.

Adam Parker Smith, Charlatan
A detail from the above “wall sculpture” by Adam Parker Smith includes a cluster of artificial succulents.

Not a Painting presents a group exhibit of wall-based works from emerging artists that are contingent upon painting, or refer to painting, or negate painting; but are not paintings. Partipating artists include Adam Parker Smith, Andrew McNay, Bob Eikelboom, Colin Oulighan, Evan Robarts, Evie Falci, Ezra Tessler, Gabriel Pionkowski, Martha Friedman, Nick Theobald, Radamés Juni Figueroa and Will Stewart. With an expansive array of materials, these individuals construct artworks that hang on the wall and have the logic of a painting but that do not use paint on canvas.

Here are a few of our favorite pieces from this fun show!

Evan Robarts Hemlock Trail
Evan Robarts, Hemlock Trail

Evan Robarts uses a weathered chain link fence as his canvas and places found colored balls where he would otherwise want to apply paint. This one is so clever.

Adam Parker Smith Bob
Adam Parker Smith, Bob

Adam Parker Smith’s Bob has the appearance of a caricature drawn with a finger on a condensation-covered antique mirror, but the condensation is actually clear resin.

Evie Falci, Ani (L), Manipura (R)

Evie Falci’s Ani (above left), and Manipura (above right) were created by affixing brightly colored rhinestones to denim. Bedazzling!

Evie Falci, Manipura (Detail)
Evie Falci, Manipura (Detail)

Ezra Tessler The Grangerfords
Ezra Tessler, The Grangerfords

Ezra Tessler’s row of monochromatic, identically shaped wall sculptures were created using oil paint on paper pulp over aluminum awning parts. Here’s a closer detail shot, below.

Ezra Tessler The Grangerfords

Loaf 2 by Martha Friedman
Loaf 2 by Martha Friedman

Martha Friedman casts colored rubber to make what looks like a slice of Pimento Loaf stuck to the wall. Brilliant.

Loaf 2 Detail
Loaf 2, Detail

Not A Painting will be on Exhibit Through July 26th, 2015 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at Bleecker) in NYC.

Not a Painting Signage

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Holton Rower, Too Many Ideas at The Hole

The Hole Gallery View
A Room Full of Ideas (All Photos By Gail, Click on Any Image to Enlarge for Detail)

If you’re intrigued by the idea of visiting an artist’s studio, where you could not only see finished works but also get a peek inside his head to discover what concepts he’s experimenting with, then I suggest you visit The Hole to check out Holton Rower’s new exhibit, Too Many Ideas.

Pour Painting Chairs

Fans of this blog may recall reading about Rower’s art when we previously reviewed his exhibit of Pour Paintings and Focus Paintings, examples of which are scattered throughout the gallery for the Too Many Ideas show. The process through which Rower creates the Pour Paintings – which are really quite gorgeous – is also adapted for use with various kinds of sculptures including functional furniture.

Pour Painting on the Floor

A Pour Painting hides behind a set of chairs, created by the same paint-layering methods.

Crumpled Pour Painting on the Floor

Here, a folded Pour Painting collapses on the ground under a work bench.

Pour Painting Bust

It looks like he had fun creating these colorful and primitive looking Busts.

Pour Painting Bust 2

Instrument Mutes

Rower also experiments with groups and collections of similar objects. Above, a collection of Instrument Mutes gather without comment on a work surface.

Miniature Tea Set

This miniature China Tea Set sits atop a found-object sculpture, which can be seen center gallery in the top photo.

Scissors Cluster

He could be creating a series of hanging, grouped objects with this precarious Scissors Sculpture, which is joined in the show by a cluster of hanging whistles and also bike lock chains.

Whistles Cluster

Origami Money Shawl

There are at least four works that involve folded paper money (can we call it origami?) including this lovely Shawl.

Origami Money Shawl
Detail from Origami Money Shawl

Not everything works, but I enjoyed the “group show” feel and the excitement of continuous discovery as I walked around the gallery taking in all of the different pieces. It will be fun to see which ideas he chooses to develop for future shows and which are abandoned.

Too Many Ideas By Holton Rower will be on Exhibit through May 4th, 2014 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at 2nd Street), NYC. Visit The Hole NYC for Gallery Hours and More Information.

Adam Green And Friends Hot Chicks at The Hole

Adam Green Hot Chicks Signage
All Photos By Gail

Adam Green used to be part of the “Anti-Folk” duo known as Moldy Peaches, a “Band” whose music was just not that good. Just being honest here. But I can’t hate on Adam Green for his responsibility in making Moldy Peaches a thing, because the guy is just too cool and hilarious to not be crazy about. As a visual and performance artist, Green strikes that perfect balance of being serious without taking himself seriously. His current exhibit, Hot Chicks by Adam Green & Friends is lots of fun. Here are some photos from the show, accompanied by my insightful commentary.

Adam Green Hot Chicks Wall

Right off the bat, I have to give Adam credit for making a lot of drawings for the show.

Adam Green Two Hot Chicks
Two Hot Chicks

The first part of Hot Chicks is comprised of Adam’s interpretations of women, or specifically: juvenile, cubist-inspired “figure” drawings with lots of boobs and weenies in them. The weenies make me think there may be some dudes involved also, but I guess that is open to the viewer’s interpretation. Maybe they are not Weenies but just very long thin Boobs: Discuss.

Adam Green Hot Chicks

This one reminds me of Princess Leia.

Adam Green Hot Chicks Sculpture

I love that he changed it up by throwing in this sculpture, while maintaining the cohesive feel of the show as a theme.

Adam Green Hot Chicks

This one I believe shows the strong influence of Picasso or Mondrian in Adam’s distinctive style.

Adam Green Peen

That looks like a Peen to me, but maybe it is a leg or arm. Please excuse the unintended image of the gallery’s fluorescent strip lights as they reflect off the glass. How gritty.

The second part of the show features fun works by some of Adam’s friends. I am a little bit jealous that he has such cool friends that can at least pretend to make art.

Art By Todd James

Here is a Hot Chick from bona fide artist Todd James, whose work is pretty rad. This was probably my favorite piece in the entire show.

Art By Macaulay Culkin

Collage Art By  Macaulay Culkin

Big Bird By Johnny T. Yerington

Big Bird as a sort of Dominatrix, By Johnny T. Yerington (AKA Adam Green)

Art By Har Mar Superstar

Art By Har Mar Superstar

Art By Alia Shawkat

Art By Alia Shawkat from Arrested Development

Worleygig’com gives this exhibit Two Boobs Up.

Hot Chicks By Adam Green And Friends will be on Exhibit through January 31st, 2014 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at 2nd Street), NYC. Visit The Hole NYC for Gallery Hours and More Information.

2014’s First Art Joke: Jim Joe’s January 2014 at The Hole

Jim Joe at the Hole Glass of Water
A Glass of Water and A Lottery Ticket are Examples of Jim Joe’s “Art,” at the Hole (All Photos By Gail)

Jim Joe (real name and identity unknown) is a NYC tagger/street artist who writes his name, and an occasional saying, on buildings around the various NYC boroughs and, The Hole Gallery would have us believe, apparently wants to be taken seriously as an artist. OK, whatever. I like to keep an open mind about what constitutes “Art” in a contemporary sense, but this exhibit takes even the James Franco School of The Emperors New Clothes Phenomena to a new level of bullshit.

Opening on New Year’s Day, 2014 and running through the month of January, the January 2014 show will expand daily as The Hole adds to the exhibit each day with new works by Jim Joe. We dropped in on Saturday, January 4th to find the works you see in this post on display and constituting the exhibit in its entirety to-date.  Yawn City.

Jim Joe Devil Head
Jim Joe Guardian Image

There were two other pieces that I declined to photograph: one that looked like a sheet of newsprint and a black, half-loop-squiggle spray-painted directly onto the gallery wall. Trust me, you’re not missing anything.

Santa Toy at The Hole

I found this little Santa Claus plush toy discarded in one corner of the gallery floor. It is unclear whether this is meant to be part of January 2104, perhaps as a found object commentary on the Commercialism of the Holiday Season. Who Knows.

We do have more than three full weeks left in the month of January, so this exhibit could take a turn for the better, say, in the next week or so. But from what I saw not it’s not worth the bother of checking out unless you want to see for yourself how much of a joke it is. Or, you could also see Adam Green & Friends Hot Chicks group show, which runs concurrently in The Hole’s rear gallery.

It’s crap like this that gives Contemporary Art a bad name. Color me not impressed.

Kelsey Brooks: Better Living Through Chemistry at Judith Charles Gallery

Kelsey Brooks Group of Four
All Photos By Gail

On Saturday night, Geoffrey and I made an unplanned pit stop into the Judith Charles Gallery, having been attracted in from the sidewalk, to view an eye catching exhibit from San Diego based artist Kelsey Brookes. Entitled Better Living Through Chemistry, this show features a large body of work and is Brookes‘ first solo exhibition in New York.

Kelsey Brooks Wall

Brookes’ appealing visual style derives from his background in molecular biology, which, of course, explains why these round canvases look like acid trip influenced interpretations of human brain scans. According to the press release, “Brookes has taken his knowledge of scientific images and expanded them into extremely intricate paintings that explore the mutability of human consciousness. His painstaking process involves the painting of hundreds of concentric shapes that are both psychedelic and grounded in empiricism.” This exhibit reminded me a bit of Holton Rower’s equally colorful Pour Paintings show at The Hole from last year.

Kelsey Brooks Pink

Kelsey Brooks Multi Colored

The many round canvases vary in size from 12-inches in diameter up to a size that nearly fills an entire wall. While they are very similar, each one is uniquely different from the next.

Kelsey Brooks Large Yellow
This One Covers nearly an Entire Wall

There are also a selection of large rectangular canvases with designs that are very similar to a sky full of exploding fireworks. I am not sure how much longer this show will be up, but you should definitely check it out if you are in the neighborhood.

Kelsey Brooks B&W Fireworks

Kelsey Brooks Pink Fireworks

Needless to say, but you can see I am about to, Brookes’ paintings create a very psychedelic personal viewing experience, especially to those who are, or have ever been, as Jimi Hendrix so precisely put it, “Experienced.”

Kelsey Brooks Multi-Colored Fireworks

Kelsey Brookes Better Living Through Chemistry is on Exhibit through January 2014 (I’m guessing this means through the end of the month though no specifc date is listed on the Gallery website), at the Judith Charles Gallery (formerly Charles Bank Gallery), Located at 196 Bowery (at Spring street), New York, NY 10012. Hours are Wednesday to Friday 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM and Weekends 12 Noon – 6:00 PM.

Kelsey Brooks Exhibit Signage

Holton Rower’s Pour Paintings & Focus Paintings at The Hole

Holton Rower Pour Painting 1
All Photos By Gail

The Hole Gallery on Bowery is the place to go right now to see two great exhibits under one roof. In tandem with the abstract group exhibit, Xtraction, the gallery is hosting two diverse bodies of work by painter Holton Rower that are equally impressive. Rower’s Pour Paintings, which resemble huge, abstract psychedelic targets as well as the concentric rings that appear in a bisected tree trunk, take their name from the artist’s process of pouring hand-made acrylic paints over a wood “canvas.”

Holton Rower Pour Painting Close Up

In this photo above you can see the edge detail of where the paint drips over and extends beyond the boundaries of the canvas.

Holton Rower Pour Paintings 2

The process of creating pour paintings is probably most identified with Lynda Benglis, but while the process is similar, Rower’s paintings are truly unique and have a wildly organic feel.

Holton Rower Pour Paintings 3
Holton Rower Pour Paintings 3 Close Up

Detail from Painting in Photo Above

Holton Rower’s Pour Paintings are unbelievably gorgeous and these photos can’t accurately capture their color and vibrant energy.

Holton Rower Focus Paintings Wall

In the same gallery, Rower introduces a new body of work he calls Focus Paintings that, hilariously, are created to deliberately appear out of focus. What makes these muted yet colorful paintings even more fun to ponder is the fact that the artist refuses to divulge the process through which he creates them.

Holton Rower Focus Painting

This one reminds me of an abstract representation of a photo of a galaxy. Really beautiful.

Pour Paintings: Focus Paintings By Holton Rower will be on Exhibit through June 20th, 2013 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at 2nd Street), NYC. Visit The Hole NYC for Gallery Hours and More Information.