Tag Archive | pablo picasso

Modern Art Monday Presents: Woman Dressing Her Hair Pablo Picasso

Woman Dressing Her Hair Pablo Picasso By Gail Worley
Photo By Gail

Pablo Picasso created this work, Woman Dressing Her Hair (1940) in the months prior to the German occupation of Royan, France, where he fled from Paris as the Nazis advanced across Europe. He depicted a woman inside a boxlike room barley bigger than her body; her massive figure is awkwardly compressed and her contorted body juts this way and that. Transforming a familiar and typically serene subject in art history — a woman grooming herself — into a powerful grotesque, Picasso lent expression to the anxiety and confinement that attended this dark period.

Photographed at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Stuart Davis, Super Table

Stuart Davis Super Table
Photo By Gail

Although Stuart Davis did not travel to Paris until 1928, he was well versed in avant-garde European art, including the innovative still lifes of of Pablo Picasso. Super Table (1925) experiments with the nature of the genre, toying with issues of illusion and perspective. Davis was also influenced by popular advertisement imagery, and his graphic style evokes the mechanical, cartoon like forms of commercial printing that were the hallmark of American culture

Photographed in The Art Institute Chicago.

Allouche Gallery Presents Ron English, Guernica

Rock Band Guernica
Rock Band Guernica By Ron English (All Photos By Gail)

Allouche Gallery is currently hosting the first major exhibit in their beautiful new home in the Meatpacking District — and what a way kick things off!  Guernica features the debut of eighteen new paintings by contemporary Pop and street artist, Ron English.

Mythological Guernica
Mythological Guernica

The series, which took two years to complete, references the artist’s own narrative to Pablo Picasso’s renowned Guernica, painted in 1937. English utilizes the Guernica template to relay powerful messages about the endless cycles of creation and destruction through the use of his globally recognized imagery and iconography.

Flintstones Guernica
Flintstones Guernica

It is great fun to see how English — who is a genius at manipulating pop culture icons and tropes — fluidly riffs on Guernica to include  everything from The Flintstones to Star Wars to Guitar Hero.

Star Wars Guernica
Star Wars Guernica

Ron at the Opening
Ron English Talks with Fans at Last Week’s Opening Reception

Ron was present at the opening reception, and he is always very gracious when it comes to signing and taking photos with fans.

Baby Guernica
Baby Guernica

Fat Food Guernica
Fat Food Guernica

The painting above has the names of popular fast food or fast casual restaurants stenciled just under the images.

Kill All Lies Guernica
Kill All Lies Guernica

Seconds Before Impact Guernica
Seconds Before Impact Guernica

Guernica By Ron English will be on Exhibit Through October 19th, 2016 at  Allouche Gallery, Located at 82 Gansevoort Street (Across from the Whitney Museum) in New York City’s Meatpacking District.

Monotype Snoopy Vs Simpsons Guernica
Monotype Snoopy Vs Simpsons Guernica

Modern Art Monday Presents: Objects on a Table By Patrick Henry Bruce

Objects on a Table
Photo By Gail

American artist Patrick Henry Bruce (1881-1936) painted Objects on a Table (1920-21) in France, where he lived from 1904 to 1936. This still life depicts cut fruit, a glass with a straw, block-like shapes, and an architectural column with clean lines, geometric clarity, and cool tonalities. The painting exudes a rational stillness, especially when compared to Cubist still lifes by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. In fact, Objects on a Table marks a deliberate and profound departure from Cubism, which gained negative associations during World War I because its fragmentation of form appeared to visualize the conflict’s deadly destruction.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Jeff Koons Gazing Ball Paintings at Gagosian Gallery

Monet Water Lillies
Monet’s Water Lillies with Gazing Ball (All Photos by Gail)

Hey remember back in the spring of 2013, when Jeff Koons launched his magnificent Gazing Ball series? I sure do. Gazing Ball was a collection of stark white Greco-Roman statuary, augmented by assorted replicas of common objects such as a Mail Box or Snowman, each of which was enhanced with a bright blue mirrored globe, also known as a Gazing Ball. Trust me: it was Rad.

Ship

So, Gazing Ball is a Thing now. Koons revisited the concept when he created the artwork for Lady Gaga’s 2014 CD, ArtPop, and now he’s done it again with a massive show at Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea appropriately titled Gazing Ball Paintings.

Naked Chicks

As the title implies, Gazing Ball Paintings are Koons’ copies of works by Famous Masters with a Gazing Ball attached to the front of each canvas.

Klimt

As much as I am inclined to suggest that Koons “phoned it in” for this series, that is not to say that I didn’t totally love the work.

Rembrandt

Because, just as the crappiest attraction at Disneyland is still lots of fun, Jeff Koons is Jeff Koons. He could go full-on Yoko Ono and I would still go see the show.

Picasso

I should probably mention that photography using a “Professional Camera” — which is what the Gagosian staff call a point-and-shoot camera — is not allowed. You can only take photos of the art using a Smart Phone or, I am guessing, an iPad. Lame City.

Mona Lisa

Up Next: Gazing Ball with Food.

Jeff Koons Gazing Ball Paintings will be on Exhibit Through December 23rd, 2015 at Gagosian Gallery, Located at 522 West 21st Street in the Chelsea Gallery District. Jeff Koons!

Gazing Ball Billboard
Gazing Ball Billboard at the Highline

Modern Art Monday Presents: Stuart Davis Edison Mazda

Edison Mazda
Photo By Gail

In the early 1920s, in response to the industrial age and increasing consumerism, Stuart Davis began to incorporate commercial goods and advertising graphics into his art. Edison Mazda (1924), with its flattened space and collage-like composition, resembles the Cubist still lifes of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. But rather than portraying pipe racks and candlesticks, Davis includes a contemporary manufactured object: a blue, seventy-five watt light bulb.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Wasp and Pear By Gerald Murphy

Wasp and Pear
Photo By Gail

In 1922, upon discovering the cubist paintings of Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Juan Gris in the window of a Paris gallery, Gerald Murphy told his wife, “If this is painting, then this is what I want to do.” Soon after, he ended his career as landscape architect and turned to painting.

In Wasp and Pear (1929), Murphy combined an abstract background with an anatomically detailed but highly stylized wasp, pear, leaf and honeycomb. The artist credited “the large technically drawn and colored charts of fruits, vegetables…[and] insects” in a classroom where he has studied during his military training as his inspiration.

Gerald Murphy (1888 – 1964) painted only fourteen known works, seven of which remain.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Roy Lichtenstein, Stepping Out

Stepping Out
Photo By Gail

By the 1970’s, Lichtenstein turned his eye toward the history of art, appropriating figures and motifs from the first half of the twentieth century and repainting them with Benday dots – the means of shading in newsprint and magazine pictures – in his signature palette of bright primary colors. For Stepping Out, (1978), he took one of Fernand Leger’s famous compositions, Three Musicians (1944), and added a female figure whose dramatically reduced and displaced features resemble the Surrealist women painted by Picasso in the 1930s.

Roy Lichtenstein’s Stepping Out is part of the permanent collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Picasso Bull Statue, West 58th Street

Picasso Bull Sculpture
Photos By Gail

Post yesterday’s crazy snow storm, I was out exploring today and walked south from Central Park down Fifth Avenue and around the front of the Plaza Hotel, just because. Right across from the Plaza’s posh entrance, on West 58th Street, there sits this mythic Bull Statue by the great Pablo Picasso, which was added in 2000 to what is actually the north facade of The Solow Building, also referred to as 9 West 57th Street.

I like that there is still some snow on the Bull’s horns.

Picasso Bull Sculpture

Update: I’m adding a photo taken on February 19th, 2017, which gives you some perspective of exactly where this Bull is located!

Picasso Mythic Bull Statue

Modern Art Monday Presents: Pablo Picasso, Fruit Dish

Pablo Picasso Fruit Dish
Photo By Gail

Between 1907 and 1911, Pablo Picasso continued to break apart the visible world into increasingly small facets of monochromatic (using one color) planes of space within his cubist style. Painted in Paris, during the Winter of 1908-09, Fruit Dish is considered to be one of the most outstanding examples of this process.

Fruit Dish is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.