Tag Archive | Miniature

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Bathroom from the Carrie Stettheimer Dollhouse

stettheimer dollhouse bathroom photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

One of the most popular artifacts at the Museum of the City of New York is the Dollhouse of Carrie Walter Stettheimer (18691944) which weaves together the fashion and style of New York’s Gilded Age in miniature form. Stettheimer (sister of artist Florine Stettheimer) worked on the 12-room dollhouse over the course of twenty-five years, from 1916 to 1935, creating many of the furnishings and decorations by hand.

stettheimer dollhouse bathroom photo by gail worley

Styles vary from room to room, yet the wallpapers, furniture, and fixtures are all characteristic of the period following World War I. The dollhouse is particularly notable for its original, miniaturized works crafted especially for Stettheimer by renowned avant-garde artists of the 1920s, including a 3-inch version of Nude Descending a Staircase by Marcel Duchamp. From the Limoges vases in the chintz bedroom to the crystal-trimmed candelabra in the salon, Stettheimer infused her artistic sensibility into every detail of the house. The dollhouse measures approximately 28 inches tall, 50 inches long, and 35 inches wide.

Take a video tour of the Stettheimer Dollhouse, where this Pink Bathroom can be seen at 1 minute 13 second mark, at This Link!

Eye on Design: Scale Model of Progressland for the 1964 New York World’s Fair

Progressland Scale Model
All Photos and Video By Gail

The scale model of Progressland refers to the General Electric pavilion at the 1964 World’s Fair, whose themes were “Progress through Electric Power” and “The Wonders of Atomic Energy.”

Progressland Scale Model

In a brochure from the time, Progressland is described as “a large graceful building with a curving 200-foot-wide dome, supported by a unique pattern of swirling circular pipes. It is eye-catching by day . . . and dazzlingly colorful by night.”

Progressland Scale Model

Video of Colorful, Illuminated Dome

Progressland By Walt Disney

Progressland featured a Walt Disney presentation of electricity’s history and future, as well as actual nuclear fusion first hand. In Richard Rush’s carefully crafted model, made around the time of the fair, we can today appreciate the hope imbued into the temporary architecture, which celebrated a golden era of optimism in technical innovation and scientific exploration.

In 1967, the attraction was moved to Tomorrowland at Disneyland in Anaheim, California as the Carousel of Progress, remaining there until 1973.

Progressland Scale Model

Photographed at the Chamber Boutique on 23rd Street, West of 10th Avenue.

Casey Kaplan Gallery Presents: I Went to School With Someone Called Jonathon Monk

A Copy of Deflated Sculpture No 1
A Copy of Deflated Sculpture No 1 By Jonathan Monk (All Photos By Gail)

When it comes to my taste in Contemporary art, two things that always draw me in are clever appropriation and subversive absurdity. I just love that shit. And that is part of the reason I had such a good time at this exhibit called I Went to School with Someone Called Jonathon Monk, which is over at the Casey Kaplan Gallery. You should check it out.

For this extremely fun and cerebrally stimulating exhibit, artist Jonathan Monk (whose first name is intentionally misspelled in the exhibit’s title) interprets significant biographical events in his own life by filtering his art projects through the works of artists that have influenced him. Or something like that. According to the Press Release, Monk’s work “is a continuing engagement with notions of authorship and identity, as he recasts iconic works of art with a consistent and incisive humor.” Take a look at the above photo, for example.

In the gallery’s front room, you’ll see the above pictured work entitled A Copy Of Deflated Sculpture No. 1, which any art fan can tell immediately is a knock off of an iconic, Jeff Koons Inflatable. What you might not know is that the sculpture is “a facsimile of Monk’s subtly deflated copy of Jeff Koon’s iconic inflatable bunny, exhibited in his 2009 exhibition with the gallery, The Inflated Deflated.” Does your brain hurt yet? Mine does.

Here are additional works we enjoyed!

Miniature Paul McCartney in a Santa Suit

Together Again But Always Alone (2014) is a miniature statue of Paul McCartney dressed in a paint-smeared Santa suit, which references artist Paul McCarthy’s 1999 performance piece, Tokyo Santa. So genius.

Dichroic Glass with Model

Figurative Sandwich (2014) features two Black and White prints (Vintage foundation garment ads) on either side of a sheet of Radiant Plexiglas, which possibly references the works of Dan Graham.

Rainbow Painted VW Hood

You’ll Never See My Face In Kansas City (2007) Enamel Paint on Volkswagen Type I Beetle Hood.

From One State To Another

From One State To Another (Sewn Together To Make A Whole) (2014), Souvenir scarves from every American state sewn together in the shape of the country, a reference to the embroidered maps of the late Alighiero Boetti.

Skull

Mistakes Have Been Made (2014), Marble Sculpture of Child’s Skull-Shaped Eraser.

Pennies on the Wall

From the Year I was Born Until the Year I Left America (2014), 31 C-prints mounted on Medium Density Fiberboard.

Art On Fire

Three Part Piece (Untitled Wood Destroyed). Taking a lost, early wooden sculpture by American minimalist Carl Andre as its starting point, Monk displays the work in three variations – a charred replica, a photograph of its original condition, as well as video documentation of the work burning (seen in the photo above).

Worleygig.com Highly Recommends This Exhibit!

I Went to School With Someone Called Jonathon Monk will be on Exhibit Through October 18th, 2014 at Casey Kaplan Gallery, located at 525 West 21st Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Jonathan Monk Signage

Miniature Andy Warhol Painted Campbell’s Soup Cans

Warhol Mini Campbells Soup Cans

What you can’t see in this photo is the “No Photography” Sign, which, seriously, I didn’t even notice!!

Miniature Drumset Made From Food Cans

This awesome miniature set of drums, created from empty food tins with their lids used for cymbals, is just so clever, I’m surprised no one ever thought of it before.

Image Courtesy of Artist Helmut Smits Via Found Shit Dot Com

Midtown Manhattan on a Desk Top

This scale miniature of Midtown Manhattan by Artist Michael Chesko took 2000 hours to complete. As reference, Chesko used blueprints, old photographs, digital reproductions, and satellite images. On a good day, he’d work his way through four city blocks. The entire model is 36″ x 30″ – a good deal smaller than most office desks. At the 1:3200 scale, the Empire State Building is approximately the height of a Campbell’s Soup can.

From Tinselman Via Neat-O-Rama