Tag Archive | Art

Pink Thing of The Day: Jeff Koons’ Moon (Light Pink)

Moon Light Pink
All Photos By Gail

If you missed the Jeff Koons Retrospective that just closed at the Whitney Museum this past weekend after a 3-plus month run, then you missed your chance to see this lovely piece of art up close and personal. Your bad! Like his famous Balloon Dog — the reflection of which is visible in the photo above — Moon (Light Pink) is one of Koons‘ mammoth steel sculptures with the hypnotic mirrored finish that make it so much fun to photograph, but impossible to get really clean shots due to its endlessly reflective surface! I think Moon looks like an oversized, inflatable button. Love this thing!

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Artist Shepard Fairey to Release Limited-Edition Art Prints: Poster For George

George Harrison Silver
Poster for George: Silver Edition (Images Courtesy of Big Hassle PR)

There is no denying that George Harrison was a ridiculous babe, as evidence by the above poster, which was created by Shepard Fairey based on a photograph by Astrid Kirchherr. I want to own it.

Poster For George will be offered in two editions — Red and Silver — as a tie-in with the recent release of the CD Box Set, George Harrison: The Apple Years 1968-75. Both editions are limited to 400 signed and numbered copies. The posters are being sold one day apart and via separate webstores, as detailed below.

The Silver Edition (pictured above) is an 18×24″ Screen Print, which be released October 24th, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST through the George Harrison web store located: This Link.

George Harrison Red

The Red Edition will go on sale on October 23rd, at a random time between 10:00 AM and 12 Noon PST through Fairey’s Obey Giant Web Store. Both poster editions will sell for $65 each and here is a limit of 1 print per household/person.

About the posters, Shepard Fairey remarked: “My parents were Beatles fans and introduced me to them at a young age. In college, I grew to especially love the later Beatles albums like Sgt. Pepper, The White Album, and Abbey Road. George Harrison started to contribute more songs to the later Beatles albums that were just as strong as any Lennon-McCartney compositions.

I got George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass album a long time ago, but even as a kid listening to the radio I reacted very emotionally to the song “My Sweet Lord.” The song has a profound beauty and melancholy that is unique and powerful. I love George’s solo material musically, but what speaks to me most about George’s music and actions is his humanity and his soulfulness.

I think George looked at himself as a world citizen, and not only brought international influences into his music, but was sensitive to human rights and politics around the globe. I’ve always seen music and art as amazing pleasures, but also as relatable vehicles to deliver a point of view. Art and music can invite people to think about something they might ordinarily not be interested in.

George put together the Concert For Bangladesh as a way of using his music to benefit humanity. I admire that he went beyond just writing songs addressing issues, and used his significant cultural weight to be an activist and put something noteworthy together, both as a way of raising money for Bangladesh, and of publicizing the situation there. George is a hero.”

Honeybees Mandalas By Mary Sweeney

HoneyBee Mandalas By Mary Sweeney
All Photos By Gail

Artist Mary Sweeney’s Honeybees reflect her fascination with insects. These two meticulously rendered Mandalas produce a complex aura that alludes to the mystery surrounding the disappearance of beehives, and how their disease imperils all life on Earth. The lacelike rendering of the stilled bodies rekindles their steady droning, if only in the memory of the viewer.

Honeybees Madala
Photographed at A.I.R Gallery Located at 111 Front Street in DUMBO.

Honeybees Madala Detail

Leo Villareal’s Chasing Rainbow

Chasing Rainbow1
All Photos By Gail

You know, I am such a sucker for anything that lights up, and I was utterly captivated by Chasing Rainbow, an LED sculpture on exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum. The circuitry behind the lighting allows it to change color and patterns continuously, but of course I wanted to capture as much pink as possible!

Chasing Rainbow 2

Modern Art Monday Presents: Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea By Mark Rothko

Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea
Photo By Gail

From Moma Dot Org:

Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea pictures two creatures dancing between sea and sky, surrounded by arabesques, spirals, and stripes. The forms “have no direct association with any particular visible experience, but in them one recognizes the principle and passion of organisms,” Rothko said. For him art was “an adventure into an unknown world”; like the Surrealists before him, Rothko looked inward, to his own unconscious mind, for inspiration and material for his work.

Mark Rothko applied the paint in transparent layers — a practice he retained when he abandoned representational images and began to develop his large–scale color field paintings a few years later.

Pumpkinhead – Self Portrait By Jamie Wyeth

Pumpkinhead Self Portrait
Photo By Gail

Jamie Wyeth (son of artist Andrew Wyeth) began painting Pumpkinhead (1972) as a portrait of his friend, Jimmy Lynch, but eventually finished the painting himself, wearing the pumpkin as a mask.

Cropped at the ankles and and wearing a too-small military jacket, he stands alone in a hazy field strewn with dry autumn leaves. To the artist, the jack-o-lantern carries an eerie charm. “I always  loved the carved face just leering at you…” he admits.

Photographed By Gail at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

If There Is To Be a Revolution, There Must Be a Party

Afronauts
Photo By Gail

This photo by Cristina De Middel was originally part of her series, The Afronauts, which tells the real, re-imagined story of the Zambian space program to conquer Mars. Here, it has been repurposed for her recent exhibit Seven Stories at Dillon Gallery in the Chelsea Gallery District.