Tag Archive | Art

Favorite Art from Frieze 2015

Stacked Blue Cookies
All Photos By Gail

When you set out to peruse large volumes of Contemporary Art, it is always a good idea to have an open-minded partner in crime along for the ride. Geoffrey was in LA last weekend, so I attended Frieze 2015 with a new friend, Scott, who, back in the mid-to-late-90s played guitar in one of the most notorious American Rock bands to find commercial success since the seventies, when the band called Alice Cooper staged mock-executions as part of its live show. But that story is, perhaps, for another time, because today I want to share photos with you of select pieces of art that Scott and I enjoyed at the Frieze Art Fair, which took place on Randall’s Island from May 14th to 17th.

Paola PIVI It's Not Fair
Paola PIVI’s It’s Not Fair: Bear Covered with Blue Feathers

Hannah Starkey Untitled
Hannah Starkey, Untitled

While we traveled from booth to booth, one of the topics Scott and I discussed is how much we dislike it when an artist labels a work “Untitled” instead of giving it a proper name. WTF is up with that? It makes it seem like you don’t care. It’s lazy. It’s like not naming one of your children. And it needs to stop.

Red Draped Coat 2

We both really liked the above sculpture, the title of which I could not locate, but I am pretty sure it is not called Untitled. It reminds me of a Jawa, the hooded characters in Star Wars, but if you look closely you can see it is a sculpture of a Red Coat as it would hang if draped on a hook, but without the hook. Clever and compelling.

Loredana Sperini
Pink Neon Raindrop Sculpture by Loredana Sperini

Art By Tomas Saraceno
BR2237-0607/M+1 By Tomas Saraceno

A few years ago, Geoffrey and I saw a crazy great sculpture called Cloud City by Argentinian-born artist Tomás Saraceno, which was on the roof of The Met in the summer of 2012. The piece above echoes the modular shapes that are a signature characteristic of Saraceno’s work.

Satoshi Ohno Prism Dark Night
Satoshi Ohno, Prism Dark Night.

I remember gasping audibly when I saw these two works by Japanese artist Satoshi Ohno, which are unbelievably gorgeous. Ohno is also a Japanese Idol, actor, radio host, and singer — being the lead vocalist and leader of Japanese boy band Arashi. Talk about a Renaissance man!

Satoshi Ohno Prism Sunset
Satoshi Ohno, Prism Sunset

Josiah McElheney Blue Prism Painting III
Josiah McElheney, Blue Prism Painting III

Even though the above piece by Josiah McElheny is called a painting, it is really a sculpture.

Berta Fischer

Neon Lucite Sculpture by Berta Fischer. I love her work.

John Giorno It's Not What Happens It's How You Handle It
John Giorno, It’s Not What Happens It’s How You Handle It

We love the text-based paintings of artist and poet John Giorno. It is always cool and fun to see one of his new pieces.

Matthew Darbyshire CAPTCHA No. 31 Sitting Lion
Matthew Darbyshire, CAPTCHA No. 31 – Sitting Lion

This Lion is made from stacked hollow tubes.

John McCracken Rythym
John McCracken Rythym

There was a fantastic selection of plank works by the late John McCracken in the David Zwirner booth.

It's The Buzz Cock By Linder
It’s The Buzz, Cock By Linder

Buzzcocks fans might recognize the above work by artist and radical feminist icon Linder (AKA Linder Sterling) from the picture sleeve of that band’s 1977 single “Orgasm Addict.” It certainly was impossible to miss, even from across the room.

Daniel Rich
Art By Daniel Rich

Carlos Garaicoa Dudas Sober el Paraiso Terrenal
Carlos Garaicoa, Dudas Sobre el Paraiso Terrenal

The above title translates to “Doubts about the earthly paradise.” See a detail shot of this work just below.

Dudas Sobre el Paraiso Terrenal

He Won't Hurt You
He Won’t Hurt You

Monir Farmanfarmaian

Above, you see selected Mirror Mosaic works by legendary Iranian artist Monir Farmanfarmaian. We just saw her exhibit, Infinite Possibility at the Guggenheim, and it was beyond amazing!

Lips That Look Like a Flame

Lips That Look Like a Flame? We love it.

Andy Coolquitt Found Deodorant Bottles
Andy Coolquitt, Neo-Deo: Found Deodorant Bottles Displayed in a Glass Vitrine

Marie Angeletti Catwoman
Marie Angeletti, Catwoman: Digital Print on Polished Steel

I hope you enjoyed your free peek at this year’s Frieze Art Fair! See you next year!

Hektad Loves You

Hektad Loves You Distribution Box
All Photos By Gail

The street artist known as Hektad has left this message of love for all NYers in the form of a colorfully painted alternative weekly distribution box located on the western traffic island at the intersection of Houston and Bowery (where I stood to photograph the Ron English Mural currently on display).

Hektad Loves You Distribution Box

Please Don’t Steal It, OK?

Adriano Costa, Lipstick Boutique at Frieze NY

Lipstick Boutique
All Photos By Gail

Frieze NY Weekend may be over until next year, but I’ve got a ton of cool photos to share with you so you can feel like you were there with me! You’re welcome! One of the pieces we really liked is this collage by Brazilian artist, Adriano Costa. Costa works with found objects and collage to translate the detritus of commodity culture into infinitely curious compositions. This collage, entitled Lipstick Boutique (2015) reminded me so much of works by David Shrigley; not just for the style but for the sense humor.

Draw a Penis

Isn’t the above just like something you’d see at a Shrigley exhibit? Sure it is.

Truth About My Sex Tape Hell

I like this one too. It could stand on its own for sure, but it certainly adds to the whole in this piece that took up an entire wall at the Frieze booth of the London-Based Sadie Coles Gallery.

Male 25

Do you know this guy? I think I have dated him.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Lee Krasner, The Seasons

The Seasons
Photo By Gail

In The Seasons (1957), Lee Krasner (1908 – 1984) combined a traditional subject with modern, pictorial form, the all-over composition. Historically, the subject of the four seasons has offered artists the opportunity for allegorical mediations on the life cycle. Krasner’s version exemplifies the regenerative portion of that cycle, with boldly, almost garishly colored plant forms that seem to morph into sexual organs.

This monumental painting offered Krasner an outlet during a time of deep personal sorrow. The year before, her husband, and fellow artist Jackson Pollock, had died in a car accident. In the wake of the sudden loss, Krasner remarked about The seasons, “the question came up whether one would continue painting at all, and I guess this was my answer.”

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Jenny Morgan, All We Have is Now at Driscoll Babcock Galleries

Shadow Play

Driscoll Babcock Galleries is currently hosting a collection of very personal and provocative paintings by Jenny Morgan, entitled All We Have is Now. The artist’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, All We Have is Now is an investigation of darkly charged psychological works in intense hues. This new series of paintings present amorphous, yet graphically stark figures (Warning for the Prudish: Full Frontal Female Nudity)  rendered in a richly saturated prismatic array of colors.  Centered on themes of life, death, and rebirth, Morgan’s works question how we relate to our past and challenge us to live in the present.

Woman with Skeleton

Morgan painted the skeletal work, In The Moment (Death Hymn), by rendering each bone individually, without any prior plotting or planning. The end result shows not only a variety of techniques and colors, but a sense of spontaneity, freedom and immediacy. For a subject matter so deeply entrenched in death, the end result is a life affirming meditation.

SKELETON WOMAN

In Skeleton Woman, life and death connect in the forms of a darkened skeleton draped over the exuberant figure of a woman. While the heft of the skeleton could weigh the figure down, she balances with an almost weightless pose.  For Morgan, these works are about “releasing old skeletons” and being able to “look at everything in the light and realize it no longer feels so dark.”

DARK STAR
Dark Star (Detail)

Deeply personal, yet thoroughly universal, the works in All We Have is Now achieve a striking intensity and psychological depth, breaking through the ideals of traditional portraiture and the preciousness of realism.

Skull with Crown

Jenny Morgan’s All We Have is Now will be on Exhibit Through July 2nd, 2015 at Driscoll Babcock Galleries, Located at 525 West 25th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Jenny Morgan Signage

Pink Think of The Day: Elizabeth Taylor by Russell Young

Pink Elizabeth Taylor
Photo By Gail

Russell Young (born March 13, 1959) is a British-American artist. In the late 1970s, while living in London, he gained recognition photographing the early live club shows of Bauhaus, R.E.M. and The Smiths. During this period he shot portraits of Morrissey, Bjork, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, New Order, Diana Ross, and Paul Newman. In 1986, he shot the Faith sleeve for George Michael. In the following ten years he directed more than 100 music videos during the heyday of MTV.

In September 2000, while living in New York City, he began to concentrate on art and to devote himself to painting. Young is best known for his enamel, screen-print paintings on linen, which explore celebrity, rock and roll, death and history. His earliest notable works as an artist are his “Pig Portraits” – life-size Police mug shots of celebrities screened onto canvas. First shown in 2003, they proved a critical success and were exhibited in London and the United States.

Russell Young is represented by Taglialatella Galleries in NYC and you a can see a good selection of his large, glittery portraits any day, just by popping in during regular business hours. I took this shot of Young’s portrait depicting a stunning Liz Taylor at the opening reception for the launch of his new print of Jackie O. You miss so much when you don’t live in NYC.

Melodie Provenzano Presents Stealth Peace at Nancy Margolis Gallery

Color Bow
Color Bow By Melodie Provenzano (All Photos By Gail)

I stumbled on the listing for Melodie Provenzano’s Stealth Peace exhibit (on now at Nancy Margolis Gallery) when I was looking for cool shows to add to last week’s art crawl, and was immediately attracted to her painting of the above image: a giant colorful bow. I love hyper-realism and the more I looked at the online preview, the more I knew this would be a must-see exhibit. I was not mistaken.

Glass and Figurines

Stealth Peace, Provenzano’s first solo exhibition with the gallery, features a new series of highly detailed paintings of single objects and still lifes, all based on objects — toys, glassware, figurines, bows — the artist has collected herself. It is really quite charming and compelling, and I would recommend it especially for fans of Jeff Koons’ Banality series.

Russian Doll

Melodie offers that her collections, “is a well of inspiration that I rely upon when composing the still lifes that I draw and paint from direct observation. The artworks are like a catalog of dreams with layers of meaning open to interpretation.”

Four Paintings

She continues, “One may find impressions, reflections and sensations as various as the objects in them. The meanings are revealed through visual metaphors of the experiences that we share as human beings, dependent as much upon where the viewer is coming from as where I have been.”

Figurine and Mirror Ball

Ballerina

Provenzano works on one painting at a time, making it her world until it’s completion, and her attention to detail in each work is just insane.

Pink Baby Bottle

She even paints the shadows!

Babies in Champagne Flute

Paintings such as Heaven and Hell have a specific theme in contrast to Champbaby! (above), a straightforward, playful spin on the common found object – a full champagne glass spilling out miniature toy baby figurines.

Glass and Figurines with Bow

Reign Bow
Reign Bow

In addition to her still life compositions, Provenzano paints singular objects, notably, the two largest paintings in the exhibition, Color Bow and Reign Bow, each 54” x 72”. Enlarged way beyond their normal size these otherwise mundane objects are imbued with a gorgeous powerful presence.

Still Life With Traffic Cone and Penis

Nostalgia, memory, loss, a bygone era, these are the underlying themes of Provenzano‘s work. Bringing together her passion for collecting found objects, which eventually become the subject of her paintings, we see this melding into her art practice alongside a thoughtful searching with-in.

Party Hats and Fishing Flies

Melodie Provenzano’s Stealth Peace will be on Exhibit Through June 27th, 2015 at Nancy Margolis Gallery, Located at 523 W 25th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Melodie Provenzano Signage