Tag Archive | Art

Eyeball Dress

Eyeball Dress
All Photos By Gail

In these photos, what looks like a wearable Eyeball Dress is actually a sculpture, make up of tiny ceramic tiles, called Million Eyes Woman, by artist Marek Zyga. Photographed at the Evan Lurie Gallery Booth at the Summer 2015  Affordable Art Fair in NYC.

Eyeball Dress Detail
Eyeball Dress Detail

Group of Four Trees by Jean Dubuffet at 1 Chase Manhattan Plaza

Group of Four Trees
All Photos By Gail

Group of Four Trees (1969-72 ) by artist Jean Dubuffet is a black and white sculpture standing just in front of the black and white Chase Manhattan Bank building. The similarities between the sculpture and building, however, stop there.

Group of Four Trees Detail

The building’s straight lines and evenly-spaced rows of windows stand in contrast to the irregular surfaces of Group of Four Trees. The forms of the trees are made up of a series of varying planes, all white, and connected together by thick black outlines. The trees’ canopies lean in different directions, and the heights of the four trees are all different, making the viewer’s eye move all around the sculpture, following the many lines that are present.

Group of Four Trees Detail

The trees manage to look both big and small at the same time. Although almost dwarfed by the surrounding buildings, Group of Four Trees in turn stands high above the people who walk by. Because of the unusual shapes of the trees, and the lack of natural color, the trees seem not quite organic. They do, however, add dynamic movement to the plaza.

Group of Four Trees Detail

In 1969, David Rockefeller, then chairman of Chase Manhattan Bank, asked Jean Dubuffet to design models for a possible sculpture to be placed in front of the bank’s new building. Already, the building’s plaza included Isamu Noguchi’s Sunken Garden, completed in 1964, and the bank’s leaders wanted to add another sculpture as well.

Dubuffet submitted a number of models, of which Group of Four Trees was chosen. He then enlarged the piece for placement in the plaza. The sculpture is made of synthetic plastic over an aluminum frame, with a steel armature holding the whole piece together.

Group of Four Trees is located in the Chase Manhattan Bank Plaza, off Pine Street, between Nassau and William Streets, in NYC’s Financial District.

Video Clip of The Week: Pussy Riot, “Refugees In” (Filmed Live at Dismaland)

Today’s Europe faces a big new challenge. The current refugee crisis will become a defining issue of our generation. Pussy Riot feels this European challenge as their own. Over 750,000 refugees have arrived in Europe so far in 2015. Many more are coming. They are mostly escaping from war or persecution in Syria, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Iraq, Sudan. Thousands are dying on the way. In the UK, for example, refugees cannot apply for asylum from outside the country – so they are forced to travel there illegally.

Why can’t we live in a truly global world, not one with locked borders, razor wires and refugee camps? History has shown that migrants can be innovative and entrepreneurial. Look at the US for an example of a whole culture built on the input of immigrants and migrants. Thousands of ordinary people across Europe are trying to help, but most governments are not matching their efforts. We believe in solidarity with human beings in need, wherever they are from, whatever their background. This is not a question of politics or nationality, but of saving human lives. The music video “Refugees In” is dedicated to the refugees. Thia powerful piece was filmed on September 25th, 2015 during the Pussy Riot performance at Banksy’s Dismaland with the generous help from director Ralf Schmerberg and music producers bretonLABS, Ten Ven and Alexandre Parsons.

Pussy Riot have joined forces with London-based art-group The Connor Brothers (Mike Snelle and James Golding) who have started the NGO “Refugee Response Foundation” to help the refugees in Calais. Pussy Riot will visit Calais in January 2016 to build shelters in association with students from the architecture department at Cambridge University to help the housing problem. If Europe closes the borders hundreds of thousands of Muslims, putting on the line everything they have to escape radical Muslim state, will never be able to see another world. Some of them will join that very ISIS, being embittered and disappointed in the good will of European states. We should accept and save those who flee countries occupied by terrorists. The time of grief for the dead should not become a time in which we betray the belief of millions in the humanity of the European world. Our grief should not teach us to aim for revenge, war and hate. It should teach us to help and show real compassion for each other.

Pussy Riot is now recording several pieces of music, the main idea is to oppose the right-wing conservative curtain that seems to be falling globally, no longer just affecting Russia but countries across Europe and the US. Neo–facist parties in Europe, Donald Trump in the US, the rise of Germany’s AfD; it’s fucking scary. And it’s the reason and it’s the time to be loud and proud of your feminist, LGBTQ and pro-refugees values.

Nadya Tolokonnikova of Pussy Riot concludes, “We are planning to release a lot of disturbing videos next year. We hope that you will not like them.”


Pussy Riot at Dismaland

Mary Heilmann Geometrics: Waves, Roads, etc. at 303Gallery

Rose Wave
Rose Wave (All Photos By Gail)

303 Gallery is currently hosting an exhibition of new works by Mary Heilmann, whose work you might remember from This Post.


On view are an arrangement of paintings on canvas and handmade paper, glazed ceramics, and a group of her distinctive furniture sculptures.

Cups on a Table
Cups on a Table

Wryly poking around the history of abstract painting, Heilmann’s imaginative approach to the geometries of spaces, things and thoughts has made her one of the foremost painters of her generation. Adopting waves and roads as inspiration for many of the works in this show, her deft perceptive logics suggest simultaneously intimate and expansive experiences.

Highway My Way
Highway My Way

In Heilmann’s paintings, waves and roads each generate their own sources of life. They move and travel and interlock. Positive and negative space inhabit alternating roles, as colors riff on memory in vibrant undulations as well as protracted expanses. Heilmann’s geometrics abut forms and steer the eye backward between them and seemingly through them.

Maricopa Highway
Maricopa Highway

San Andreas

In San Andreas (2012), a glowing red core pokes through chunks of earthy green glazed ceramic, its tactile surface bubbling with tension. In The Geometry of a Wave, a tiny painting on paper suggests an entire universe in two colors. Pigment pools in the paper’s irregular crevices, as a wave’s fragile surface is rendered with a penetrating directness.

First Date
First Date

In his memoir Barbarian Days, William Finnegan writes of the hallucinatory power of surfing, “It was as if we were suspended above the reef, floating on a cushion of nothing . . . Approaching waves were like optical illusions.” Heilmann’s own waves begin to depict a similar imagery with their synchronic positives and negatives. What seems like a simple gestural game drifts into the essential, into an intuitive understanding of a form’s resonance and a furtive ability to shape it.

Sunny Chaise 10 and 4
Heilmann’s Sunny Chaise #10 and #4 shown at the Exhibit Opening Reception

To that end, Heilmann’s installation of her signature chairs encourages viewers to sit, linger and engage in dialogue with the paintings, with each other, and with themselves. To sit and watch the waves, to hit the road.

Left and Right
Left and Right

The edges of the paintings point at each other; one can imagine the air between them as tactile. If a painting has its own language, why not try to speak with it?

Mary Heilmann’s Geometrics: Waves, Roads, etc. will be on Exhibit Through December 19th, 2015 at 303 Gallery, Located at 507 W 24th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Geometric Left
Geometric Left

Mary Heilmann Signage

Pink Thing of The Day: Captured City of Kandor by Mike Kelley

City of Kandor in Bell Jar
City of Kandor in a Bell Jar (All Photos By Gail)

According to the comic book legend, Superman’s father Jor-El sent his infant son to safety on Earth before Krypton’s destruction, saving his life but inadvertently sentencing Superman to a future of displacement, loneliness and longing.

Superman grows up believing that Kandor – his city of birth – was destroyed, but later discovers his real home still exists, having been stolen by intergalactic archvillain Brainiac prior to Krypton’s demise, shrunken to a miniature metropolis and left trapped inside a glass bottle.

Superman ultimately wrestles Kandor away from Brainiac and hides it in his Fortress of Solitude, sustaining its citizens with tanks of Kryptonic atmosphere.

City of Kandor Detail

As artist Mike Kelley (1954 – 2012) once explained, Kandor functions for Superman as “a perpetual reminder of his inability to escape the past, and his alienated relationship to his present world.”

Jeff Koons Gazing Ball Paintings at Gagosian Gallery

Monet Water Lillies
Monet’s Water Lillies with Gazing Ball (All Photos by Gail)

Hey remember back in the spring of 2013, when Jeff Koons launched his magnificent Gazing Ball series? I sure do. Gazing Ball was a collection of stark white Greco-Roman statuary, augmented by assorted replicas of common objects such as a Mail Box or Snowman, each of which was enhanced with a bright blue mirrored globe, also known as a Gazing Ball. Trust me: it was Rad.


So, Gazing Ball is a Thing now. Koons revisited the concept when he created the artwork for Lady Gaga’s 2014 CD, ArtPop, and now he’s done it again with a massive show at Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea appropriately titled Gazing Ball Paintings.

Naked Chicks

As the title implies, Gazing Ball Paintings are Koons’ copies of works by Famous Masters with a Gazing Ball attached to the front of each canvas.


As much as I am inclined to suggest that Koons “phoned it in” for this series, that is not to say that I didn’t totally love the work.


Because, just as the crappiest attraction at Disneyland is still lots of fun, Jeff Koons is Jeff Koons. He could go full on Yoko Ono and I would still go see the show.


I should probably mention that photography using a “Professional Camera” — which is what the Gagosian staff call a point-and-shoot camera — is not allowed. You can only take photos of the art using a Smart Phone or, I am guessing, an iPad. Lame City.

Mona Lisa

Up Next: Gazing Ball with Food.

Jeff Koons Gazing Ball Paintings will be on Exhibit Through December 23rd, 2015 at Gagosian Gallery, Located at 522 West 21st Street in the Chelsea Gallery District. Jeff Koons!

Gazing Ball Billboard
Gazing Ball Billboard at the Highline
Jeff Koons Signage

DIY Psychedelic Recycling Bin

Pyschedelic Recycling Bin
Photo By Gail

Hey, here’s a simple, cost-effective and undeniably creative way to liven-up an ordinary, bland blue recycling bin that you might have sitting out back on your patio, or in the basement or garage, or wherever. All you need are hands, a few cans of spray paint and little bit of an aesthetic feel for what colors look good together.

I saw this bin in the backyard of artist Mark Kostabi. I can’t say if Mark actually did the painting, but it pleases me to imagine that he did.