Tag Archive | Art

Damien Hirst Dot Boot for Manolo Blahnik

Damien Hirst Dot Boot
Photographed By Gail at the Brooklyn Museum

In the 1960s, low-heeled Go-Go boots were worn with space-age inspired miniskirts designed by Andre Courreges and Pierre Cardin. Here, Manolo Blahnik refits the Go-Go boot with his signature stiletto heel and artist Damien Hirst’s colorful, neo-Pop dots on a lunar white background. These boots can currently be seen at the Brooklyn Museum as part of its Killer Heels exhibit.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: John Chamberlain, Dorkdorf

John Chamberlain Dorkdorf
All Photos By Gail

I didn’t get turned on to the unique sculptural style of John Chamberlain until his Spring 2012 Retrospective at The Guggenheim, at which point Chamberlain had only recently passed away. Chamberlain was best known for his dynamic sculptures created with scrap metal from salvaged cars, which are held in many public collections.

John Chamberlain Dorkdorf 2

This piece, Dorkdorf (1988) is made from painted and chrome-plated steel and is very representative of his style. At this time this photo was taken (July 2014) it was on exhibit in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, though the piece is privately owned, so there is no telling how long it will remain on public view.

John Chamberlain was considered to be a master of creative re-use and he continues to inspire many artists to use found metal in their art. He died at his home in Manhattan on December 20th, 2011 at the age of 84.

Brooklyn Museum Presents Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe

Killer Heels Catalog Display
All Photos By Gail

If you are what some people refer to as a “Shoe Freak,” or even a fan of Art, Design and Fashion, you will want to hoof it over to the Brooklyn Museum to see Killer Heels, a fantastic exhibit of High Heeled Shoes that opened just yesterday. Geoffrey and I were lucky enough to attend the opening reception and party this past Saturday and we had all kinds of crazy fun.

Party Table Decor
Let’s Party

Let’s relive the good times now, by enjoying some of my photos from the party and the exhibit.

Tattoo Station

To get people in the mood for shoes, Party-goers were able to get a temporary tattoos with one of two designs based on the shoes pictured below (which, obviously are part of the exhibit):

Flaming Shoes

I got this one of a pair of Wedge Heels decorated with Flames! Fast!

Red Fetish Boots

Or you could choose a design based on these “Kinky Boots” fetish style Red Thigh High Boots!

W Mag With Rihanna on the Cover

They were also giving out the latest issue of W Magazine with Rihanna on the cover. She does nothing for me but people seem to like her for whatever mysterious reason.

Piper-Heidsieck Brut Champagne

Piper-Heidsieck was a sponsor for the party and their delicious Champagne flowed freely.

Bar

In addition to an open bar and passed hot Hors d’oeuvre, there were also some sweet treats.

Vanilla Cake Ball

Such as these Vanilla Cake Balls and also Milk Chocolate Miniature Gold Pumps.

Milk Chocolate Gold Pump

Mmm…Little Chocolate Shoes.

Ferrragamo Platform Cake

Speaking of Sweet Treats, check out this rad cake made in the likeness of Salvatore Ferragamo’s very famous multi-colored suede platform sandal created for Judy Garland back in 1938! As far as I know, nobody even got to eat this cake, and that’s just a shame.

Killer Heels Signage

OK, let’s leave the party behind and go look at some Killer Heels. Here we go!

Ornate Gold Shoes

Killer Heels explores fashion’s most provocative accessory. From the high platform chopines of sixteenth-century Italy to the glamorous stilettos on today’s runways and red carpets, the exhibition looks at the high-heeled shoe’s rich and varied history and its enduring place in our popular imagination.

Candlestick Heel Boots
Candlestick Heel Boots

Gold Winged Slipper

Red Shoes

As fashion statement, fetish object, instrument of power, and outlet of artistic expression for both the designer and the wearer, throughout the ages the high-heeled shoe has gone through many shifts in style and symbolism.

Betty Grable Display View

Deadly sharp stilettos, architecturally inspired wedges and platforms, and a number of artfully crafted shoes that defy categorization are featured among the more than 160 historical and contemporary heels on loan from designers, from the renowned Brooklyn Museum costume collection housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and from the Bata Shoe Museum.

Spike Ankle Boot
Close Up of Black Spiked Stiletto Boot from Above Display

Designers and design houses represented in Killer Heels include Manolo Blahnik, Chanel, Salvatore Ferragamo, Zaha Hadid X United Nude, Iris van Herpen X United Nude, Christian Louboutin, Alexander McQueen, André Perugia, Prada, Elsa Schiaparelli, Noritaka Tatehana, Vivienne Westwood and Pietro Yantorny.

Ferragamo Judy Garland Platform
Here’s That Ferragamo Platform Sandal Again. It is so Legendary.

Platform Boot With Spur
Platform Boot With Spur

Presented alongside the objects in the exhibition are six specially commissioned short films inspired by high heels. The filmmakers are Ghada Amer and Reza Farkhondeh, Zach Gold, Steven Klein, Nick Knight, Marilyn Minter, and Rashaad Newsome.

Silver Guggenheim Shoes

“Everyone loves to wear shoes inspired by the Guggenheim Museum!” I heard someone say about this pair of silver space age shoes. Coincidentally, there was a lady at the event wearing these exact shoes!

Two Green Shoes

Shoe Hat
Shoe Hat

Horse Hoof Boots
Horse Hoof Boots

Red Wedgewood Pumps
Red Wedgewood Pumps

Foot Shoes
Almost Like Going Barefoot?

Chanel Light Bulb Heels
Chanel Light Bulb Heels

Space Age Boots

If Ace Frehley had been a woman, surely he would have worn these boots as part of his Space Ace costume in Kiss.

Amber Toed Pump

There is just so much great art tied into the design of all of these shoes, it was easy to feel a bit overwhelmed by the flood of genius and beauty.

What a great show! I recommend you go see it as soon as possible!

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe will be on Exhibit Through February 15, 2015 in the Robert E. Blum Gallery (1st Floor) at the Brooklyn Museum, Located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York 11238-6052. Take the 2 or 3 Trains Right to the Eastern Parkway Stop.

Beatles Dress

Beatles Dress
All Photos Taken By Gail at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

A fluid back-and-forth between contemporary art, music and fashion characterized the 1960s. Made for Universal Studios as a rare promotional item, this Beatles dress illustrates three ideas central to Pop Art – the blending of Art and Advertising; the instant obsolescence of fashion; and the cult of the rich and famous.

Beatles Dress Detail
Print Detail

Its brightly contrasting print mimics Andy Warhol’s repetitive silk-screened images of celebrities and commercial products through the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Beatles Dress Side View
Back View of Dress. (Note: Red Anish Kapoor Wall Sculpture in the Background.)

Regarding the black patent leather mid-heeled shoes on the mannequin, designed by Roger Vivier, The Beatles themselves were avid customers of Vivier, a fashion designer credited with the Stiletto heel.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Ellsworth Kelly, Spectrum V

Ellsworth Kelly Spectrum V
Photo By Gail

I want you to appreciate that I had to wait patiently for about 15 minutes for a child and her oblivious mom to stop effing around in front of this 13 panel color fied installation that makes up legendary minimalist Ellsworth Kelly’s Spectrum V (1969) before I could get this photo. You’re welcome.

Ellsworth Kelly (born May 31, 1923) is an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker associated with hard-edge painting, Color Field painting and the minimalist school. His works demonstrate unassuming techniques emphasizing simplicity of form, similar to the work of John McLaughlin and Kenneth Noland. Kelly often employs bright colors. He lives and works in Spencertown, New York.

Spectrum V, a gift of the artist, is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Qalandia 2087 by Wafna Hourani at the New Museum

Qalandia 2087
All Photos By Gail

One of my favorite pieces from the Here and Elsewhere, group exhibit currently up at the New Museum of Contemporary Art is a mixed media installation called Qalandia 2087 by Palestinian artist Wafa Hourani.

Qalandia

Qalandia 2087 fills nearly an entire gallery at the museum and is lots of fun to explore while contemplating the political and sociological ramifications of the piece, especially considering what is going on in that part of the world at this very moment in time.

Qalandia 2087

Here is some information I found on the piece at Nadour Dot Org:

Built from cardboard boxes and archive photographs, Qalandia 2087(2009) is the third and last part of a series of installations by Wafa Hourani.

Qalandia

The artist reproduced, as an architectural model, one of main check-points and Palestinian refugee camps. Located in the north of Jerusalem, Qalandia constitutes, since 1949, Ramallah’s entrance and the exit point, dividing the country on its western bank.

Qalandia 2087

Hourani was interested in this particular place in the Palestinian history, because of its proximity with its own airport, transformed into military base during the Israeli occupation. This paradox of a territory, initially connected to the rest of the world and now a place for Palestinian isolation, illustrates the politico-social reality of the country.

Qalanida 2087 Rose Courtyard

Qalanida 2087 Rose Courtyard Detail

In Qalandia 2087, the artist proposes a futuristic vision of this place, a hundred years after the first Intifada. Contrary to the first two pieces in the series, which presented an apocalyptic vision of Qalandia – a hundred years after the exodus Palestinian for Qalandia 2047 (2006) and a hundred years after the six day old war for Qalandia 2067 (2008), the last version evokes the future of Palestine on the basis of political Utopia.

Qalandia 2087 with Fish

Qalandia 2087 with Fish Detail

The question of the occupation of a given territory is no longer relevant, the main concern is now integration. The wall, which originally divided space between the check-point and the refugee camp, has been replaced by a mirror facade.

Qalandia Airport

Qalandia Airport has also retrieved its initial function as a civil airport, while the check-point has become a place reserved for public speech. Life seems to win again.

Qalandia 2087

Racing cars, airline planes, whimsically shaped TV aerials, a coffee terrace and a swimming pool transform the refugee camp into a space where communication and social links become possible again. The new party, “The Mirror,” has just won the elections and is sending each Palestinian back to their history by inviting them to take part in the construction of a better future.

Vérane Pina
Translated by Valérie Vivancos

Here and Elsewhere is on Exhibit Through September 28th, 2014, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, located at 235 Bowery (at Prince street) in Soho, NYC.

Qalandia 2087 Patio Detail

Qalandia 2087 Patio Detail

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Photos By Gail

The above pictured sculpture, Suspended Objects (2011) was created by artist Hassan Sharif from countless long strands made up of multi-colored yarns, twine, string and wire, tied together and also wrapped around bits of plastic, foam and other found objects. It’s super colorful and reminds me of a big Jellyfish.

Suspended Objects is part of the Here and Elsewhere group show now on exhibit at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, previously discussed in this post, so click that link for more information!

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Suspended Objects (Detail)