Tag Archive | 1969

Modern Art Monday Presents: Ilona Keserü, Wall-Hanging with Tombstone Forms

Wall-Hanging with Tombstone Forms
Photo By Gail

Ilona Keserü belongs to a generation of Hungarian artists that emerged in the wake of the Revolution of 1956, which had resulted in restrictions on officially acceptable art and suspicion of avant-garde art produced in Western styles — particularly abstraction. Keserü and other Hungarian artists flourished in abstract modes, despite this marginalization. A vibrant unframed tapestry, Wall-Hanging with Tombstone Forms (1969) exemplifies her desire to merge modern abstraction with references to Hungarian folk culture, making something with local resonance out of an otherwise international vocabulary of hard-edge painting. The undulating, toothlike motif recurring throughout the composition relates to artists study of gravestones at the Balatonudvari Cemetery, southwest of Budapest.

Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

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Pink Thing of The Day: Conversation By B. Morgan

Conversation
All Photos By Gail

Conversation, a grouping of colorful public seating (by artist B. Morgan) is located in the rear of the plaza at 77 Water Street, just off Water  and Old Slip in NYC’s Financial District.

Conversation

Conversation

When I took these photos, a lot of people, appropriately, appeared to be using this area to sit and talk on their phones. This space is also adjacent to where a bunch of food trucks park, so it’s a convenient place to sit and eat and people watch while the weather is still decent.

Conversation

Those big pink partitions also make it an ideal location to hide from your co-workers while you are on a smoking break.

Conversation

Conversation

Modern Art Monday Presents: Robert Smithson, Map of Broken Glass (Atlantis)

Map of Atlantis
All Photos By Gail

While there is no shortage of very cool artworks to see at the Dia: Beacon Museum in Beacon, NY, one of my favorite things that I saw on my recent trip there with Geoffrey is Robert Smithson’s Map of Broken Glass (Alantis) which is mind blowing on so many levels. First of all, it’s huge pile of dangerous glass shards sticking up into the air, which if you fell onto them, they would surely injure you gravely. Take a closer look:

Shards of Glass
Ouch

I almost can’t believe they don’t have some kind of rope thing around its perimeter to keep kids from impaling themselves. But then again, it’s cool that the Museum trusts people to not be complete idiots, because to have to guard visitors against observing the work close-up would be to compromise the art; at least that’s what I think.

Map of Atlantis

According to Artist Alan Rapp, “The tons of shattered glass forming Map of Broken Glass (Atlantis) (1969) are layered both literally and figuratively. As the title implies, the sculpture is to be seen not simply as a pile of flat, sharp, transparent fragments but also as a map of a legendary lost continent (almost certainly, however, a fictional one).

Smithson’s work suggests that the concrete materiality of sculpture depends on the mind’s ability to see metaphorically in order to comprehend meanings within the language of art. The resulting gaps are passageways akin to Alice’s Looking Glass or the Bellman’s blank map, in that they are thresholds to an elsewhere.”

Map of Atlantis

Robert  Smithson died in a plane crash on July 20, 1973, while surveying sites for his work Amarillo Ramp in the vicinity of Amarillo, Texas. He was just 35 years old. What a shame and great loss to the art world, and the world in general. Despite his early death, and relatively few surviving major works, Smithson has a following amongst many contemporary artists. The Dia: Beacon has an entire large gallery dedicated to his work, and there are perhaps six or seven of his earthworks on display. You should grab a coffee and go see them.

Robert Smithson Signage

Modern Art Monday Presents: Frank Stella, Hiraqla Variation III

Hiraqla Variation III
Photo By Gail

Stella’s title, Hiraqla Variation III (1969) refers to Hiraqla, an archeological site in present-day Iraq that contains a half-built circular structure probably constructed around 800 CE. Thus, the circular canvas, brilliant coloring and geometric patterning reference complex domes and intricate tile work of Islamic architecture.

Photographed at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, while on loan from the Norton Simon Museum.

Happy Birthday, Dave Grohl!

Neal Smith and Dave Grohl 2011
Alice Cooper Drummer Neal Smith with Dave at the Golden Gods Awards in Los Angeles, 2011

Foo Fighters front man and former drummer for Nirvana, Dave Grohl celebrates his Birthday today, having been born on January 14, 1969. Have a rockin’ Birthday, Dave!

Led Zeppelin Release Debut Album

On This Date, January 12th, in 1969: Led Zeppelin released its debut album in the UK (the US release date was January 17th). The album’s iconic cover artwork, chosen by guitarist Jimmy Page,  features a Black & White photo of the 1937 Hindenburg airship  disaster. Led Zeppelin!

The Who Record Pinball Wizard


Pinball Wizard Picture Sleeve (German Release)

On This Date, February 7th in 1969: The Who recorded “Pinball Wizard” at Morgan Studios in London. Although it was not one of songwriter Pete Townshend’s favorites, it went on to become by far the most popular song from the rock opera, Tommy, reaching #4 in the UK charts and #13 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. “Pinball Wizard” remains part of The Who’s live set to this day. Perhaps they will perform it later today when they provide musical entertainment for the half time show at the Super Bowl (aka The Stupid Bowl), which I will be doing everything in my power to avoid watching!