Tag Archive | Fire

Eye On Design: The Pixel Fire Sofa By Cristian Zuzunaga

Pixel Sofa
All Photos By Gail, Except Where Noted

After four hours at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), we were still looking out for that one Wow! piece of the show. We knew we had found it when we spotted the Pixel Fire Sofa: part of the Pixel Series from Cristian Zuzunaga. I’ll say it now: Wow!

Pixel Fire Sofa From Website
Pixel Sofa Front View (Image Source)

It was not possible to get a good, clear shot of the front of the sofa, due to the Fair’s high volume of foot traffic, and of course many people stopping to look at, touch, and sit on this fantastic piece of furniture.  I pulled the above image off the website to let you really see the full sofa without obstructions.

Pixel Sofa Back
And here’s the Sofa as seen from the back

The Pixel Sofa was born of a 2007-2008 collaboration with Moroso UK (designer of sofas, armchairs and accessories) and Kvadrat (Europe’s leading manufacturer of designer textiles) to design a limited edition sofa based on  Cristian’s pixel print designs applied to upholstery.

Pixel Upholstery Angled Front View

I think you will agree that the results are spectacular!

Pixel Upholstery Detail
Pixel Upholstery and Pillow Cover Detail

The Pixel sofa also comes with a generous selection of coordinating throw pillows and cushions for a comfortable and fully immersive experience! Fire is one of six distinctive design variations in the Pixel series. Each design is unique, so no two sofas will ever look identical.

Pixel Sofa and Pillows Detail

An intrinsic element to Cristian’s work is his belief in the way that color can positively affect human emotion. As a result, the covers are removable, allowing you to change the look of your sofa to reflect your mood and your individual style. Suggested price point: 5,995 Euros.

Pixel Sofa Lengthwise View

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John McCracken at David Zwirner

Installation View
Installation View Left to Right: Galaxy, Rhythm, Flare. (All Photos By Gail )

Hey, do you enjoy the work of legendary minimalist artist John McCracken? I sure do. According to the obituary published in the New York Times when McCracken passed away in 2011 at the age of 76, “he was one of the few artists affiliated with the [Minimalist] movement who did not object to its name, and who made most of his work by hand: sanding and polishing his enamel, lacquer or resin surfaces until their colors achieved a flawless and reflective perfection.” Right now, David Zwirner Gallery, who has represented McCracken’s art for two decades, is hosting an exciting collection of the artist’s late career works, whose monochromatic, highly reflective surfaces are inspired in part by the West Coast’s car culture. Sigh. If you are in any way a fan, you will not want to miss this exhibit.

Flare, 2008
Flare, (2008)

The exhibition presents key examples from three discrete groups of work — leaning multi-part wall pieces, wall-mounted multi-part reliefs, and freestanding columns — that McCracken created outside of his iconic planks. On view are a selection of the artist’s Beam works, each comprising multiple tall narrow components that lean against the wall, first exhibited in his 2008 solo presentation at David Zwirner.

Installation View
Installation View: Space is on the far left

Song, 2008
Song

Some multi-part works, such as Space (2008), consist of a rhythmic combination of an array colors, here blue and green; while others like Song (2008) explore tonal, more subtle variations within a single color, in this case red. Still others are monochromatic.

Galaxy 2008
Galaxy (2008)

Rhythm, 2008
Rhythm, (2008)

Fire (Left) 2007
Left: Fire,  Right: Light

Titles are likewise employed as a pictorial metaphor in McCracken’s lesser-known wall reliefs, such as Fire (2007), created for documenta 12 in 2007, and Light (2004), which exist in the interstices of painting and sculpture.

Chord 2004

Above and Below: Chord (2004)

Chord 2004

Blue Arc, Red Mara, Black Wave, Green Siskiyou
Blue Arc, Red Mara, Black Wave, Green Siskiyou

In the front gallery you’ll find a grouping of four eight-foot tall freestanding columns, arranged in a configuration similar to the artist’s 2004 exhibition at the gallery, exploring the phenomenological relationship between work, viewer, and architecture through their outsized stature.

Blue Arc, Red Mara, Black Wave, Green Siskiyou

Reflection off of Wave, 2004
Reflection off of Siskiyou (1988)

Sculptures By John McCracken’s will be on Exhibit Through April 15th, 2017 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 537 West 20th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Signage

Light (Rear Wall)
Light (2004), Rear Wall

Beavis and Butthead to Return to TV with New Episodes!

“Fire! Fire!”

Oh boy oh boy!! One of my favorite, iconic TV shows from the 90s, Beavis & Butthead is making a comeback. Series creator – and the voice of most of the characters – Mike Judge is reportedly putting together 30 new episodes to continue the adventures of his inarticulate, animated heroes. Specifics of timing and format are still being resolved, but the process is underway. Beavis & Butthead originally aired on MTV from 1993 to 1997. I watched it religiously.

Thanks to Gossip Cop for the tip!

See You In Hell!

Hell

Hell, Michigan Heats Up for 666

HELL, Mich. (AP) – They’re planning a hot time in Hell on Tuesday. The day bears the date of 6-6-06, or abbreviated as 666 – a number that carries hellish significance. And there’s not a snowball’s chance in Hell that the day will go unnoticed in the unincorporated hamlet 60 miles west of Detroit.

Nobody is more fired up than John Colone, the town’s self-styled mayor and owner of a souvenir shop.

“I’ve got `666′ T-shirts and mugs. I’m only ordering 666 (of the items) so once they’re gone, that’s it,” said Colone, also known as Odum Plenty. “Everyone who comes will get a letter of authenticity saying you’ve celebrated June 6, 2006, in Hell.

Most of Colone’s wares will sell for $6.66, including deeds to one square inch of Hell.

Live entertainment and a costume contest are planned. The Gates of Hell should be installed at a children’s play area in time for the festivities. “They’re 8 feet tall and 5 foot wide and each gate looks like flames, and when they’re closed, it’s a devil’s head,” Colone told The Detroit News for a Saturday story.

Mike “Smitty” Hickey, owner of the Dam Site Inn, wasn’t sure what kind of clientele would show up Tuesday. “We’re all about having fun here. I don’t think we’re going to get the cult crowd, the devil worshippers or anything like that,” said Hickey, whose bar’s signature concoction is the Bloody Devil, a variant of the Bloody Mary.

Colone, meanwhile, has been in touch with radio stations as far away as San Diego and Seattle that are raffling off trips to Hell in honor of 6-6-6. The 666 revelry is just the latest chapter in the town’s storied history of publicity stunts, said Jason LeTeff, one of its 72 year-round residents – or, as the mayor calls them, Hellions or Hell-billies. But LeTeff wasn’t particularly enthused.

“Now, here I am living in Hell, taking my kids to church and trying to teach them the right things and the town where we live is having a 6-6-6 party,” he said.

According to the town’s semiofficial Web site, there are two leading theories about how Hell got its name. The first holds that a pair of German travelers stepped out of a stagecoach one sunny afternoon in the 1830s, and one said to the other, “So schoene hell” – roughly translated as, “So bright and beautiful.” Their comments were overheard by some locals and the name stuck.

The second holds that George Reeves was asked after Michigan gained statehood what he thought the town he helped settle should be called, and reportedly replied, “I don’t care, you can name it Hell if you want to.” The name became official on Oct. 13, 1841.

On the Net:

Hell, Mich.: http://www.hell2u.com/