Tag Archive | Self Portrait

Modern Art Monday Presents: John Kane, Self Portrait

John Kane Self Portrait
Photo By Gail

While Self Portrait (1929) realistically depicts John Kane’s body in his late sixties — detailing his veins, chest hair and wrinkles — it is also an object of decorative display, with a frame painted around the canvas edges and arches defining the figure’s head. Rendered in muted colors, the bare-chested artist faces his viewers against a stark background, recalling classic self-portraits and images of Christ. Kane explained, “Chiefly, I am impressed with the works of the old masters. These I cannot study enough.” Working by day as a laborer, Kane could not attend formal art classes, but he devoted much of his spare time to studying and practical painting.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Lee Krasner, Self Portrait

Lee Krasner Self Portrait
Photo By Gail

A powerful rendering by the artist in her twenties, this picture was made with a practical purpose; it was painted as a reception piece for admission to the life-drawing course at the National Academy of Design. While Lee Krasner (19081984) is best known for the personal style that she developed within the movement of Abstract Expressionism in the 19540s, this self portrait (c. 1930) is a rare example of her early work, using the thick brushwork and high color of the Impressionists and Realists of the previous generation. Strikingly, Krasner depicts herself at work in nature. She eyes the viewer, who stands on the spot where, presumably, a mirror hangs on a tree. Her expression and strong handling of light and shade evoke the resolve of a young woman rising to the challenge of her artistic vocation.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in NYC.

Chuck Close, Red Yellow Blue at Pace Gallery

Self Portrait Grid
All Photos By Gail

Artist Chuck Close is renowned for his highly inventive investigations into how we process information. Celebrated internationally, Close uses the absolute minimum amount of information necessary to render likenesses. In the new works for his sixteenth exhibition with Pace, entitled Red Yellow Blue , Close continues his involvement with the grid as an organizing device, creating full-color paintings out of only cyan, magenta, and yellow pigments, and layering colors in singular brushstrokes; applying multiple thin washes of  red, yellow and blue paint in each cell of the grid, until they accumulate into extravagant full-color images.

Red Blue Yellow Self Portraits

Although the works represent a new direction for Close, they are also a revival and reconsideration of processes he first used in the 1970s when he first restricted his palette to three colors, coaxing different saturations of paint and hue into photorealist portraits; however, this time the color has no relationship to reality.

Cindy 2013
Cindy, 2013

The earliest works in the exhibition — portraits of  Cindy Sherman and Cecily Brown — reveal the beginnings of this process, leaving the painting’s development visible.

Ceclily, 2013
Cecily, 2013

Cecily Close Up
Cecily, Detail

When viewed up close, the portrayed subjects disintegrate into grids of color evocative of Paul Klee’s Magic Square paintings. These works attest to a heightened interest in the effects of color and suggest a new way of challenging the processes through which his portraits are constructed. It allows the arrtist to create distinct works from the same image through different saturations and juxtapositions of hue.

Chuck Close Self Portrait

Chuck Close: Red Yellow Blue will be on Exhibit Through October 17th, 2015 at Pace Gallery, Located at 534 West 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Chuck Close Self Portrait

Chuck Close Signage

Pumpkinhead – Self Portrait By Jamie Wyeth

Pumpkinhead Self Portrait
Photo By Gail

Jamie Wyeth (son of artist Andrew Wyeth) began painting Pumpkinhead (1972) as a portrait of his friend, Jimmy Lynch, but eventually finished the painting himself, wearing the pumpkin as a mask.

Cropped at the ankles and wearing a too-small military jacket, he stands alone in a hazy field strewn with dry autumn leaves. To the artist, the jack-o-lantern carries an eerie charm. “I always  loved the carved face just leering at you…” he admits.

Photographed By Gail at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Leonora Carrington, Self-Portrait

Leonora Carrington Self Portrait
Photo By Gail

Surrealist painter Leonora Carrington (1917–2011) was born and educated in England but lived most of her adult life in Mexico City. She was one of the last surviving participants in the Surrealist movement of the 1930s. At one point, Carrington was involved in a relationship with fellow surrealist Max Ernst, but the couple never married.

Here is a detailed description of Self-Portrait from Met Museum Dot Org:

Sporting white jodhpurs and a wild mane of hair, Carrington is perched on the edge of a chair in this curious, dreamlike scene, with her hand outstretched toward the prancing hyena and her back to the tailless rocking horse flying behind her. The daughter of an English industrialist, Carrington spent her childhood on a country estate surrounded by animals and reading fairy tales and legends. She revisited these memories in her adulthood, creating paintings populated with real and imagined creatures. Here, the white horse, which Carrington used as her symbolic surrogate, gallops freely into the verdant landscape beyond the curtained window.

Leonora Carrington’s Self-Portait was painted in 1937 and is part of the permanent collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Andy Warhol Chocolate Bars!

Andy Warhol Chocolate Bars Packaging Display

I love chocolate, and apparently the late, great Andy Warhol was a lifelong fan of the sweet stuff as well. Now, in homage to the Pioneer of Pop Art, Praim Group – a food licensing, marketing and distribution company – has secured an agreement with The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., to create and distribute a line of all-natural chocolate bars featuring the likeness of the globally famous Artist on its wrappers.

Andy Warhol Chocolate Bars Packaging Idea of Waiting Quote

With four different designs, each wrapper also boasts one of Warhol’s famous quotes including, “All I Ever Really Want is Sugar,” “Everybody Must Have a Fantasy,” “The Idea of Waiting for Something Makes it More Exciting” and the artist’s arguably best known and definitely most misquoted saying, “In the Future Everybody Will Be World Famous for 15 Minutes.” The 3.5 ounce, all-natural “Chocolate Andy Bars,” available in both dark and milk chocolate, are an ideal collectible and perfect gift for any art fan!

Andy Warhol Chocolate Bars Packaging Famous Quote

Distribution outlets are still being acquired, so I can’t say how soon this edible chocolate collectible will be available at your neighborhood supermarket or specialty shop, but in the meantime the Andy Bars can be purchased for $5 each directly from the Praim Group’s website at This Link. Andy Warhol!