Tag Archives: friedman benda

Eye On Design: Jonathan Trayte, MelonMelonTangerine Seating

melon melon tangerine photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Suitable for either indoor or outdoor use, Jonathan Trayte’s MelonMelonTangerine loveseat (2019) brings together different colors, textures and forms supported by a tubular frame of powder-coated steel in a warm, sunshine yellow.

melon melon tangerine seating photo by gail worley
Installation View with Bikini Squash Sculpture

The seat incorporates a variety of natural and man-made fabrics including a  nylon-weave lower ‘shelf,’ black leather seats, cowhide upholstered seatbacks, and leather headrests, with furry wool armrest covering and polished brass accents. A mounted disc of polished marble provides a small table for holding your afternoon cocktails, or whatever you please.

melon melon tangerine seating photo by gail worley

Photographed at Friedman Benda Gallery in NYC as Part of the Exhibit, MelonMelonTangerine.

Eye On Design: Black Dakota Floor Lamp by Jonathan Trayte

black dakota lamp photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

A unique take on the concept of ‘Indoor/Outdoor’ furniture is perhaps unintentionally offered in British artist Jonathan Trayte’s recent exhibit of sculptural art furniture, MelonMelonTangerine, at Freidman Benda Gallery. Intended to transport the viewer to an otherworldly botanical garden, pieces like the Black Dakota Lamp (2019) combine industrial materials such as stainless steel, bronze, polymer compound, and reinforced plastics, and brass leaver, with a base covered in crushed glass, and blown-glass light sconces to create an eclectic light-emitting tree.

black dakota lamp photo by gail worley

This and other works in the collection were inspired by Trayte’s recent 2000-mile road trip through the Western United States. With a keen perception and eye for the obscure, the artist finds the surreal in our everyday surroundings and within the fabric of daily life. Realized while in isolation amidst the current pandemic, he recalls hazy visions of sedimentary rock formations, Joshua trees, lichens, silver cholla cacti and prickly pear fruits to inform this new body of work. We are excited to be featuring more whimsical works from MelonMelonTangerine in the coming weeks!

black dakota lamp photo by gail worley
Installation View With bONZA Chair (2019)

Eye On Design: Maquette 259 Seating By Faye Toogood

maquette 259 faye toogood photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

British designer Faye Toogood believes that, whatever your domain of design expertise, the materials you can get your hands on are essential, “because you are always looking for a new way to interpret your designs and to explain your story.” This approach also pertains to her recent venture from designing signature interior spaces and environments (for high-profile clients), to furniture design.

maquette 259 faye toogood photo by gail worley

Part of the exhibit What Would Have Been on view at Freidman Benda, her Maquette 259 seating (2020)  realized in a rusty-peach-painted canvas over upholstery foam aligns with this aesthetic. Toogood’s products are designed with “honesty to the rawness and irregularity of the chosen material,” and are sculptural in form. Like her interior spaces, her furniture is considerate of both the two-dimensional design as well as three-dimensional space.

maquette 259 faye toogood photo by gail worley

I love how it looks like a group of boulders just rolled together! Maquette 259 was manufactured in an limited edition of 8 pieces. Contact Friedman Benda Gallery in NYC for purchase information.

Eye On Design: Melting Thonet Chair By OrtaMiklos

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail Worley

The classic Thonet Chair design gets a super artsy, post-modern treatment with Melting Thonet, from European design firm OrtaMiklos (which includes partners Leo Orta and Victor Miklos Andersen).

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley

Generally informed by natural habitats and processes, the creative duo’s experimental approach activates their design works from the existing norms. Here, Michael Thonet’s innovative chair frame — created by bending wood with hot steam and forming it into curved, graceful shapes — is fabricated from a powder-coated steel, to create a frame that exaggerates the original’s bends and twists into an entirely different domain.

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley

Photographed at Friedman Benda Gallery in Chelsea (Contact for Pricing) as part of the Recent Exhibit, What Would Have Been.

melting thonet chair photo by gail worley

Eye On Design: Grotto Mirror By Chris Schanck

grotto mirror photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

The absence of virtually all design shows for the year 2020 (Salon Art + Design, Architectural Digest Home Show, ICFF, and on and on) — which was probably my least favorite Covid cancelation — serves as the inspiration for Friedman Benda’s latest exhibit: What Would Have Been, which I visited a few weeks ago to get my design-fix on! The exhibition gives fans access to design that lost its intended platform; works shown briefly before museum doors closed or failed to open at all. A favorite piece in the gallery (and not just because it’s pink) was Chris Schank’s Grotto Mirror — which may look familiar to some readers.

grotto mirror by chris schanck detail photo by gail worley

The Grotto Mirror is part of Schanck’s Unhomely collection, which employs his Alufoil method of sculpting industrial and discarded materials, covering them in aluminum foil and then sealing each with resin.

grotto mirror by chris schanck installation view photo by gail worley
Grotto Mirror Installation View

Each mirror is a unique piece and would surely be the center of attention in any room!

Eye On Design: Campana Brothers Bolotas Sheep’s Wool Sofa

campana bolotas sofa photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Would you like to relax and stretch out on a long, fluffy sofa the color of a giant egglant? Who wouldn’t? The Campana brothers are famed Brazilian furniture designers. Most celebrated for their design of the Vermelha chair — an iconic piece handmade from a huge length of rope, wrapped and woven to create the chair’s nest-like structure. As you can see by their Bolotas Sofa, in a vibrant shade of Aubergine, Umberto and Fernando Campana continue to create brightly colored, whimsical statement pieces for the home.

campana bolotas sofa photo by gail worley

The Bolotas collection (2015) was initially inspired by stone walls, but the name came from the first prototype that appeared to be soft and round like an acorn (‘bolotas’ means acorn in Portuguese). Each piece is covered with sustainable leather, prepared with an environmentally-friendly tanning process. The brothers decided to use natural skins to bring comfort to the design: pillows of sheepskin for the armchair and the sofa carefully arranged on a stainless steel structure with feet made from Brazilian Ipe wood, which is naturally fire, bug and water-resistant.  The Aubergine color was created in a series of eight pieces and sells for about $25,000 at auction.

campana bolotas sofa photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Friedman Benda Booth at the 2019 Salon Art + Design.

Eye on Design: Puff and Stuff Chair By Chris Schanck

puff and stuff chair by chris chance photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

What caught my eye immediately on flyers for the 2019 edition of The Salon Art + Design show was the included image of a vibrant Pink version of Chris Schanck’s Puff and Stuff Chair (2019). With it its quilted, glossy velvet upholstery and biomorphic sculptural base comprised of steel, aluminum, polystyrene, polyuria, aluminum foil and resin, the chair manages to look both organic and highly stylized simultaneously. The Pink Puff and Stuff Chair became my number-one-must-see item at the fair, but sadly my dream was not fully realized.

firedman benda booth photo by fail worley
Puff and Stuff Chair Installation View

Friedman Benda, who represent the designer, chose to display Puff and Stuff only in a Sage Green. I was disappointed, sure; but that didn’t mean I wasn’t going to write about the chair. Because, look at how awesome it is.

puff and stuff chair side detail photo by gail worley

It looks like the walls of a futuristic space cave — and please note that no two are alike. These chairs and the accompanying peach-hued pedestal table are inspired by Schanck’s 2018 solo exhibit at Friedman Benda entitled Unhomely, which focused on the designer’s acclaimed sculptural approach.

orange pedestal table detail photo by gail worley

Unhomely featured 15 works with independent, stand-alone narratives woven into an otherworldly landscape. Synthesizing premeditation and spontaneity, Schanck’s highly individualized, low-tech, idiosyncratic technique, Alufoil (in which industrial and discarded materials are sculpted, covered in aluminum foil and then sealed with resin) was conceived in 2011 during his MFA studies. The process begins with Schanck’s imaginative drawings and models, which are then executed by a team of artists and collaborators apprenticed in his Alufoil method.

Installation view photo by gail worley

Hybrids of sculpture and furniture, Schanck’s bold constructions blend biomorphic forms with elaborately crafted symbolism. These assemblages draw from a wide range of influences ranging from Brutalist and Art Deco architecture to ancient Egyptian, Anatolian and Aztec iconography. Skirting the line between refinement and camp, Schanck’s figurative, at times anatomical, creations reference science fiction films and conjure up visions of ancient aliens, hidden cavernous chambers, and monolithic space operas.

2 puff and stuff chairs photo by gail worley

Despite overt references to fantasy and meta-fiction, Schanck’s assemblages are grounded in the reality of humanity’s relentless  inventiveness. “In my work,” the Detroit native admits, “I take inspiration from the people and forms around me and dip them into a futuristic skin.”

Photographed in the booth for Friedman Benda at the Salon Art + Design 2019 in NYC.