Tag Archive | Grid

Chuck Close, Red Yellow Blue at Pace Gallery

Self Portrait Grid
All Photos By Gail

Artist Chuck Close is renowned for his highly inventive investigations into how we process information. Celebrated internationally, Close uses the absolute minimum amount of information necessary to render likenesses. In the new works for his sixteenth exhibition with Pace, entitled Red Yellow Blue , Close continues his involvement with the grid as an organizing device, creating full-color paintings out of only cyan, magenta, and yellow pigments, and layering colors in singular brushstrokes; applying multiple thin washes of  red, yellow and blue paint in each cell of the grid, until they accumulate into extravagant full-color images.

Red Blue Yellow Self Portraits

Although the works represent a new direction for Close, they are also a revival and reconsideration of processes he first used in the 1970s when he first restricted his palette to three colors, coaxing different saturations of paint and hue into photorealist portraits; however, this time the color has no relationship to reality.

Cindy 2013
Cindy, 2013

The earliest works in the exhibition — portraits of  Cindy Sherman and Cecily Brown — reveal the beginnings of this process, leaving the painting’s development visible.

Ceclily, 2013
Cecily, 2013

Cecily Close Up
Cecily, Detail

When viewed up close, the portrayed subjects disintegrate into grids of color evocative of Paul Klee’s Magic Square paintings. These works attest to a heightened interest in the effects of color and suggest a new way of challenging the processes through which his portraits are constructed. It allows the arrtist to create distinct works from the same image through different saturations and juxtapositions of hue.

Chuck Close Self Portrait

Chuck Close: Red Yellow Blue will be on Exhibit Through October 17th, 2015 at Pace Gallery, Located at 534 West 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Chuck Close Self Portrait

Chuck Close Signage

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Urban Light By Chris Burden at LACMA

Chris Burden LACMA Street Lamps Installation
Urban Light, 2008, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Sculpture, (Two-hundred and two) restored cast iron antique street lamps (Photos By Gail)

Link to Original Text Source

This forest of city street lights, called Urban Light, was created by artist Chris Burden. Despite initial appearances, the arrangement is not a perfect grid. Depending on where the viewer stands, the lamps arrange themselves in different angles and arrays.

These 202 cast iron lamps once lit the streets of Los Angeles. Burden bought one at the Rose Bowl flea market, and soon collecting and restoring street lights became an obsession. He painted them all the same neutral gray, in order to draw the eye to all the different varieties of cast iron decoration.

Burden says that street lamps like these were symbols of a civilized and sophisticated city; safe after dark and beautiful to behold. The lights all still work, and they are now powered by solar energy. They are switched on every night from dusk until dawn. At night, Burden says his sculpture becomes transformed into “a building with a roof of light.
Urban Light By Chris Burden at LACMA