Tag Archives: marianne boesky gallery

The Haas Brothers Madonna at Marianne Boesky Gallery

Michelle O Palma
Michelle O Palma, Marble Sculpture (All Photos By Gail)

The last time I can recall entering an art exhibit that completely transported me to another world, I think I was here, or even here. So, yeah, it’s been a while. I nearly missed Madonna — not the pop star, but the first solo exhibition of work by The Haas Brothers — at Marianne Boesky Gallery, but I made a special trip after work just a few days before the exhibit closed on October 26th, because I knew, if the photos I’d seen were any indication, that I’d regret not having the opportunity to experience this whimsical group of flora and fauna in person. Even better: I had the gallery all to myself!

Continue reading The Haas Brothers Madonna at Marianne Boesky Gallery

Hans Op De Beek, The Drawing Room at Marianne Boesky Gallery

Installation View with Geoffrey
Installation View With Geoffrey! (All Photos By Gail)

Marianne Boesky Gallery is currently hosting The Drawing Room, an exhibition of new work by Belgian artist, Hans Op de Beeck who works across all media including large installation, sculpture, video, animation, photography, watercolor, drawing, text, and music. His work is a wide-ranging reflection on the tragicomic way in which humans stage and organize their lives, discussing how we deal with both space and time and with each other, and how we often lose the plot along the way. Implementing seemingly banal images, Op de Beeck touches on big, universal themes, frequently serving as a memento mori for the artist. He seeks to find a balance between seriousness and a sense of perspective, between banality and the extraordinary.

Cityscape (The Road), 2015
Cityscape (The Road), 2015

In 2009, Op de Beeck first showed a collection of large watercolors in his solo exhibition In Silent Conversation with Correggio at the Galleria Borghese in Rome, Italy. Since then, Op de Beeck has worked steadily on what is now an enormous series of black-and-white watercolors of fictitious places, landscapes, characters, and objects. Within these works, free association gives rise to images suffused with a sense of melancholy, and between the lines collective themes and emotions are conveyed.

Two Women

In The Drawing Room, Op de Beeck reveals a new series of watercolors in which postmodern landscapes sit side by side with more universal, anonymous images. The artist painted these watercolors during the night, after all of the machines in his studio were switched off, the phones stopped ringing, and his staff had left, sometimes taking until dawn to complete the work at hand.

House

Nighttime
Night Time Film

Op de Beeck utilized the watercolors he has produced over the last six years to create his latest animation on view, Night Time (extended). The film takes the viewer on a silent, enigmatic journey through invented, nocturnal settings that are sometimes populated with unknown figures. The images are primarily timeless in nature, but often show contemporary cultural and subcultural references as well. Many of the frames have a cinematic feel, attributed to ‘establishing shots,’ grand panoramic views, and ‘close-ups’ of bodies and props.

Clouds

Vanitas (Variation) 2, 2015
Vanitas (Variation) 2, 2015

The film and watercolors are complemented in The Drawing Room by two sculpture series. The first, Vanitas Variation, consists of wall sculptures made from solid grey plaster. These monochromatic works combine conventional objects from the still-life genre – candlesticks, glasses, and open books—with more contemporary objects such as soda cups, cell phones, spray cans, and cigarette butts.

Vanitas (Variation)

Gesture (Cherishing), 2015
Gesture (Cherishing), 2015

The second series, Gesture, shows life-size arms (the artist’s) performing simple actions: a hand offering a few blackberries, two hands holding something fragile, a hand calmly writing. The unspectacular gestures bring poetry and solace into daily ritual, and the fossilized scenes from both sculpture series form just another part of Op de Beeck’s mute, somnolent, and nocturnal universe.

Gesture (Tree), 2015
Gesture (Tree)

The Drawing Room, an exhibition of new work by Hans Op de Beeck, will be on Exhibit Through May 2nd, 2015 at Marianne Boesky Gallery, Located at 509 West 24th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Hans Op De Beek Signage

Must See Art: John Waters’ Beverly Hills John at Marianne Boesky Gallery

Fellini's 8/1/2 Ruler
All Photos By Gail (Click on Any Image to Enlarge for Detail)

While I can’t admit to being fan of every single John Waters‘ directed film (and I have seen most of them), I sure do appreciate his artistic aesthetic, and he seems like a cool person from what I hear. So, I was really excited to rush out to the Marianne Boesky Gallery in 15 degree weather to check out Waters‘ latest exhibit (and third at this gallery) which is called Beverly Hills John. This is an ambitious exhibit which showcases the director/artist’s work in a variety of mediums including photography, prints, collage, sculpture and film — all of which I found to be utterly delightful.

Continue reading Must See Art: John Waters’ Beverly Hills John at Marianne Boesky Gallery

Must See Art: Frank Stella Sculpture at the Marianne Boesky Gallery

Puffed Star II, 2014
Puffed Star II, 2014, Polished Aluminum (All Photo By Gail)

Can you believe that Frank Stella is 78 years old and he is still making amazing sculptures like Puffed Star II? I can’t even believe it — and yet, it is true. Right now, Marianne Boesky Gallery presents Frank Stella Sculpture, the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery since joining in the spring of 2014, and you really have to check it out. Because, Look at this:

K.150, 2014
K.150, 2014

Just Look at it!

K.150, 2014

K.150, 2014

If this were the only piece in the show, it would still be worth going to. K.150, as it is called, was rendered using rapid prototyping or 3D printing. So remarkable.

More Photos After the Jump!

Continue reading Must See Art: Frank Stella Sculpture at the Marianne Boesky Gallery