Tag Archive | Dancers

Pink Thing Of The Day: Dance of The Pacific Coast Highway at Sunset By Amber Cowan

Pink Thing Of The Day
All Photos By Gail

Amber Cowan is a sculptress who works exclusively with recycled vintage glass, and her art is just phenomenal for its intricate beauty and imaginative qualities, combined with an irresistible nostalgic pull. The above tableau is entitled Dance of The Pacific Coast Highway at Sunset (2019) — was part of an exhibit of her work at NYC’s Heller Gallery, which just closed this past weekend.

Pink Glass Sculpture Detail

Amber’s work asks universal questions about rebirth, knowledge, desire and the transformative powers of labor and imagination. Her fantastical grotto-like assemblages are made of re-worked pressed glassware, once produced by some of the best known, but now-defunct, American glass factories.  In her most recent, narrative wall sculptures, she creates intricate and exuberant settings for character-objects, which she has collected over years.  Unabashedly showing her emotional investment in these objects, the artist pays spontaneous and spectacular homage to the history of US glass manufacturing.

Edge Detail

She is currently working with a process which involves flameworking, blowing, and hot-sculpting recycled, up-cycled, and second-life glass that is usually American pressed glass from the 1940’s to the 1980’s. The glass used is generally sought through thrift stores, flea markets and post-production factory runs, the places where it is has been abandoned to the dust bins of American design.

Dance of the Pacific Coast Highway

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Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Dancer by Edgar Degas

Pink Dancer By Edgar Degas
Photo By Gail

French Impressionist Edgar Degas (1834 – 1917) painted dancers for roughly half of his career, and the above pastel drawing is only one of dozens of his images depicting a dancer in a pink outfit. I saw this one, Danseuse Rose (1896) at MOMA in New York over the summer.

Carole A. Feuerman’s Hero and Leander at C24 Gallery

DurgaMa
DurgaMa (All Photos By Gail)

C24 has been one of our favorite galleries since we first discovered it with This Exhibit almost three years ago now. And the long wait we endured for the gallery to move into its new bi-level space, just half a block west of the previous West 24th Street location was well worth it, because with its cool new lower floor atrium, C24 can now showcase some truly monumental pieces, such as the hyper-realist sculptures of Carole A. Feuerman.

Leda and the Swan
Installation View: Leda and the Swan (Foreground), Monumental Quan (Background)

Feuerman is a pioneering figure in the world of hyper-realistic art, as well as her new approaches to sculpture with painted bronze pieces for the outdoors and in water. The artist works in both miniature and monumental size sculptures. We were first introduced to her work at the Jim Kempner Fine Art Gallery a few years ago, and since then we’ve seen her work in public spaces and art fairs as well — her iconic stye being immediately recognizable.

The new exhibit, Hero and Leander takes its title from a Greek mythological story of Hero (a priestess of Aphrodite) who lived in a tower off a waterway, and Leander (a young man from the opposite side of the strait). Leander fell in love with Hero and would swim very night across the waterway to be with her. Hero would light a lamp at the top of her tower to guide his way. These trysts lasted through one warm summer. On a stormy winter night, the waves tossed Leander in the sea, while the breezes blew out Hero’s light. Leander lost his way and was drowned. When Hero saw his dead body, she threw herself over the edge of the tower to be with him in death.

Releve
Releve

Hero and Leander features sculptures of swimmers/bathers, dancers and gymnasts, as well as a silkscreen on canvas swimmer triptych, pictured below.

Capri Catalina Moran Triptych
Capri, Catalina, Moran Triptych

New York Slicker
New York Slicker

The Dancer With Ball
The Dancer With Ball

Carole A. Feuerman’s Hero and Leander will be on Exhibit Through June 25th,2016 at C24 Gallery, Located at 560West 24th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.
Signage

The Golden Mean
Beyond The Golden Mean

Taku Obata’s Bust a Move at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Taku Obata TakuspeFAD, Takuspe B-Girl Down Jacket
Figures Left to Right: TakuspeFAD Jersey, TakuspeFAD, and Takuspe B-Girl Down Jacket by Taku Obata (All Photos By Gail)

Jonathan LeVine Gallery is currently hosting Bust a Move, a series of new works by Japanese artist Taku Obata, in his debut solo exhibition in the United States. Bust a Move features Obata’s dynamic wooden sculptures, drawings and lithographs of b-boys, or break-dancers, with a distinctly interpreted fashion style. A b-boy himself, the artist has a precise understanding concerning the forms of the human body and how they move, creating works that are bursting with the kinetic energy found in this urban dance form.

Taku Obata Takuspe (ALTERNATE)
Takuspe (ALTERNATE, Foreground), Takuspe B-Girl Runner (Rear)

The life-size (and larger!) sculptures in Bust a Move are captured in freeze stances, poses that complete every breakdance battle, and are adorned in brightly-colored jumpsuits with accessories sampled from the old-school b-boy style. Surreally elongated hats, glasses and gloves create the illusion of movement, in contrast with the stagnant demeanor of Obata’s subjects. The works have a dominating presence and by portraying modern dance through the ancient technique of Japanese wood-carving, the artist effectively merges popular culture with his cultural roots.

Obata fully immerses viewers in the environment of this subculture through his 3-D works, with the goal of enhancing our awareness and physical senses. In his own words, “I am not simply creating a b-boy, but I aim to create an atmosphere, a cool space with a certain strange and interesting tension.”

Taku Obata Installation View

LeVine is also displaying a collection of Obata’s drawings of b-boys in action, wearing bright, neon colored outfits.

Taku Obata Drawing

Taku Obata Drawing

Taku Obata Drawing
Drawing Detail

Taku Obata’s Bust a Move will be on Exhibit Through December 20th, 2014, at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Taku Obata Bust a Move Signage