Tag Archive | Roof of The Met

Adrián Villar Rojas’ The Theater of Disappearance On The Roof of The Met

Theater of Dissappearance
All Photos By Gail

The cooler, more inclement weather that comes with Fall is slowly encroaching, which means that the annual Roof Garden exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is about close. So, if you’ve not yet made a visit to see Adrián Villar Rojas’ fantastic installation, The Theater of Disappearance, you have until October 29th, 2017 to check out (weather permitting of course) this unique exhibit that strongly resembles the post-apocalyptic aftermath of a very fancy dinner party.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

For this site specific-installation, Argentian artist Adrián Villar Rojas (b. 1980) used the Museum itself as his subject material; drawing on objects in the collection and the history of collecting practices. To realize the extensive work, the artist immersed himself in The Met, and with its staff over many months, held conversations with the curators, conservators, managers, and technicians — 3-D scanning and imaging experts —  across every department, who all contributed to the realization of this installation. Conceived as a holistic environment, The Theater of Disappearance transfers the space of the Roof Garden into a performative diorama.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Sixteen black and white sculptures incorporate nearly one hundred detailed replicas of objects from The Met’s collection – selected from a wide variety of time periods and cultures, and reconfigured as amalgamations, The Theater of Disappearance encompasses thousands of years of artistic production over several continents and cultures, and fuses them with facsimiles of contemporary human figures as well as furniture, animals, cutlery, and food. Each object — whether a 1,000-year-old decorative plate or a human hand — is rendered in the same black or white material and coated in a thin layer of dust.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Architecture is folded into the fabric of the work. Villar Rojas’s intervention includes two radical new flooring systems – one checkerboard and the other a reflective metallic surface – as well as a redesigned bar, benches, new plantings, and an extended pergola overhead, creating dramatic setting that transforms the panoramic views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline into theatrical backdrops for the installation.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

The total effect of sculptures and environment is a dazzling, disorienting scene where all senses of the interpretive history associated with Museum objects has vanished, making way for and alternative history for art.

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

This project is dedicated to the memory of Ronald Street, The Met’s first head of digital imaging. Please enjoy more photos, which I shot during two separate visits this past summer!

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Dissappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

Theater of Disappearance

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Cornelia Parker’s Transitional Object (Psycho Barn) on the Roof of The Met

Psycho Barn
All Photos By Gail

If it happens to be a beautiful summer day in the city, and you really wish you had access to a rooftop with a killer view of Central Park, why not head over to The Met and visit Cornelia Parker’s Transitional Object (PsychoBarn), which will be installed at the museum’s roof garden through the end of October, 2016? Yes! Why Not!?

Psycho Barn Signage

The Psychobarn is, of course, a not-to-scale copy of the iconic Bates House from the Alfred Hitccock thriller, Psycho — a house which itself was inspired by an Edward Hopper painting. How meta.

Psycho Barn

Downside: It is not easy to get photos of the Transitional Object without people in them. These are my first world problems.

Geoffrey Psycho House Photobomb

Geoffrey photo-bombed me, because he thinks he is clever. I got him back later.

PsychoBarn Side View

Surprise! The House/Barn is only built on 2-sides!

Rooftop View

But who cares? Look at the beautiful day we were having!

Psycho Barn Detail Psycho Barn Detail img_3141 Psycho Barn

Cornelia Parker’s Transitional Object (Psychobarn) Is on the Roof of the Met Through October 31, 2016!

Dan Graham Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (with Günther Vogt) On The Roof of The Met

Dan Graham Installation
All Photos By Gail

Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout is a site-specific installation by Dan Graham which was installed in April of this year. Comprising curves of steel and two-way mirrored glass set between ivy hedgerows, Graham’s structure is part garden maze, part modernist skyscraper facade. Viewers who enter the work are transformed into performers; in glimpsing their own reflections, they are also made acutely aware of the act of looking.

Dan Graham Installation

For the past fifty years Graham has engaged his interest in architecture and the way it structures public space through a multidisciplinary practice encompassing writing, photography, video, performance, and—beginning in the 1970s—sculptural environments of mirrored glass and metal. He calls these hybrid structures “pavilions” after the ornamental buildings that decorate seventeenth- and eighteenth-century formal gardens—architectural fantasies inspired by the ruins of classical antiquity.

Dan Graham Installation Hedge

Dan Graham Installation

Graham’s pavilions similarly invite romance or play, but their forms and materials have a more contemporary source: the gleaming glass facades of modern office towers. For the artist, the mirrored cladding of a corporate headquarters symbolizes economic power and sleek efficiency and also provides camouflage, reflecting the world around it as it shields what happens inside from prying eyes.

Dan Graham Installation Hedge

Dan Graham Skyline Reflection

The artist’s pavilions likewise respond to their specific sites. The Roof Garden, where the idyllic expanse of Central Park confronts the tall buildings of midtown Manhattan, is both of the city and at a certain remove from it. The evergreen plantings that edge the parapets also remind Graham of the shrubbery that often demarcates property lines in the New Jersey suburbs of his youth.

Dan Graham Installation

His Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout, set within a specially engineered terrain designed in collaboration with the Swiss landscape architect Günther Vogt (born 1957, Balzers, Liechtenstein), employs these multilayered references—palace gardens, public parks, contemporary corporate architecture, and the suburban lawn—as it engages the viewer in a historic and complex mirror play.

Dan Graham Installation Curve

The Roof Garden Commission, Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout By Dan Graham with Günther Vogt will be on Exhibit Through November 2nd, 2014. The Metropolitan Museum of Art is Located at 1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street) in NYC.

Central Park Sklyline from Roof of Met

Imram Qureshi On the Roof of The Met

Imram Qureshi on the Roof of the Met
All Photos By Gail

Pakistani artist Imram Qureshi is having quite a year. Not only has he been named Deutsche Bank’s Artist of the Year, but he was also commissioned to create this year’s exhibit on the roof of NYC’s Metropolitan Museum of Art!

Imram Qureshi on the Roof of the Met 4

Qureshi was able to utilize almost 8,000 square foot of open-air space as his canvas, as he has painted with acrylics directly onto The Met’s rooftop. What initially looks like the floor of an abattoir is easily recognized by those familiar with his work at Qureshi’s signature crimson floral designs, splashed over with red paint. He has done similar installations, on various scales, all over the world.

Imram Qureshi on the Roof of the Met 2

Earlier this month, Qureshi created a site specific installation for the 2013 Frieze Art Fair which was part of the Deutsche Bank VIP Lounge. Coincidently, I was part of small group of volunteers who crumbled poster sized prints of the crimson flower /blood spatter design into smaller wads so that they could be mounted behind glass panels, as seen in the photos below. I got a pretty crazy paper cut doing this, but it was worth it.

Iram Quereshi ArIram Quereshi Art Installationt Installation
Imram Qureshi Installation at Frieze Art Fair

Iram Quereshi Art Installation2

Imram Qureshi on the Roof of the Met 3
Another Shot of the Roof

Imran Qureshi’s Roof Garden Installation will be on view until November 3, 2013 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Located at 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street. Access to the Roof is Weather Permitting.

Imram Qureshi on the Roof of the Met

Tomás Saraceno's Cloud City on the Roof of The Met

Tomas Saraceno Sculpture Cloud City
“Ooh, Big & Shiny”

Argentinian-born Artist Tomás Saraceno has created a constellation-like installation of large, interconnected modules constructed with transparent and reflective materials for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. Visitors may enter and walk through these habitat-like, modular structures, which are grouped in a nonlinear configuration.

Met Museum Front Tomas Saraceno

Over the past decade, Saraceno has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivity that merge art, architecture and science. The interdisciplinary project “Cloud Cities/Air Port City” is rooted in the artist’s investigation of expanding the ways in which we inhabit and experience our environment. SaracenoCloud City  Sculpture Section Stairs
Interior Shot of Cloud City with Stairs

Museum guests wishing to physically climb up and into Cloud City can pick up a free, time-stamped ticket on the Museum’s 4th floor on the way to the the Roof (just ask the elevator operator to let you off). Guidelines for accessing/climbing the structure can be found at This Link.

Saraceno Sculpture Ticket Entry

Although we did not enter the Sculpture, Geoffrey and I enjoyed viewing and photographing it very much. Plus, you cannot beat the Roof of the Met for views of Central Park!

Saraceno Sculpture 2 Gs Reflection
Geoffrey and Gail Reflected in the Surface of Cloud City

Central Park Tree Top View
Tree Top View of Central Park Heading West

Cloud City will be on Exhibit Through November 4, 2012 on the Roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Located at 1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street). New York, NY 10028 Phone (212)535-7710 for Hours and More Information.
Saraceno Sculpture Cloud City Poster
Saraceno Sculpture Section 3
Museum Guests Climb Cloud City on the Roof of the Met