Tag Archives: Modular

Eye On Design: A to Z 1993 Living Unit By Andrea Zittel

A to Z Living Unit
All Photos By Gail

The A to Z Living Unit (1993) designed by Andrea Zittel (B. 1965) is fabricated from Steel and Wood, and is shown here with the following accessories:

Two mirrors, four hangers, sweater, towel, soap container, calendar, filing cabinet, pencils, two notepads, folding seat, folding bed, four glass jars, two ceramic cups, two glasses, two ceramic bowls, digital clock, electric lightning system, hot plate, pot, and toaster oven.

A to Z Living Unit

The Living Unit is a modular, portable living environment that includes a place to sleep, a modest kitchen, and storage — the essentials of daily life.  Inspired by the limitations of her own 200-square-foot Brooklyn studio, Zittel began work on a series of functional living units that could be customized to meet individual needs and shape behavior according to different ideals.

A to Z Living Unit

Interested in what she describes as the “fine line between freedom and control, and how people often feel liberated by parameters,” Zittel’s living units can be viewed as simultaneously constraining in their austerity, and freeing in their utopian rejection of materialism.

A to Z Living Unit

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Tomás Saraceno’s Cloud City on the Roof of The Met

Tomas Saraceno Sculpture Cloud City
“Ooh, Big & Shiny”

Argentinian-born Artist Tomás Saraceno has created a constellation-like installation of large, interconnected modules constructed with transparent and reflective materials for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. Visitors may enter and walk through these habitat-like, modular structures, which are grouped in a nonlinear configuration.

Met Museum Front Tomas Saraceno

Over the past decade, Saraceno has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivity that merge art, architecture and science. The interdisciplinary project “Cloud Cities/Air Port City” is rooted in the artist’s investigation of expanding the ways in which we inhabit and experience our environment.

 SaracenoCloud City Sculpture Section Stairs
Interior Shot of Cloud City with Stairs

Museum guests wishing to physically climb up and into Cloud City can pick up a free, time-stamped ticket on the Museum’s 4th floor on the way to the the Roof (just ask the elevator operator to let you off). Guidelines for accessing/climbing the structure can be found at This Link.

Saraceno Sculpture Ticket Entry

Although we did not enter the Sculpture, Geoffrey and I enjoyed viewing and photographing it very much. Plus, you cannot beat the Roof of the Met for views of Central Park!

Saraceno Sculpture 2 Gs Reflection
Geoffrey and Gail Reflected in the Surface of Cloud City

Central Park Tree Top View
Tree Top View of Central Park Heading West

Cloud City will be on Exhibit Through November 4, 2012 on the Roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Located at 1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street). New York, NY 10028 Phone (212)535-7710 for Hours and More Information.
Saraceno Sculpture Cloud City Poster
Saraceno Sculpture Section 3
Museum Guests Climb Cloud City on the Roof of the Met