Tag Archive | Artist

Modern Art Monday Presents: Robert Smithson, Map of Broken Glass (Atlantis)

Map of Atlantis
All Photos By Gail

While there is no shortage of very cool artworks to see at the Dia: Beacon Museum in Beacon, NY, one of my favorite things that I saw on my recent trip there with Geoffrey is Robert Smithson’s Map of Broken Glass (Alantis) which is mind blowing on so many levels. First of all, it’s huge pile of dangerous glass shards sticking up into the air, which if you fell onto them, they would surely injure you gravely. Take a closer look:

Shards of Glass
Ouch

I almost can’t believe they don’t have some kind of rope thing around its perimeter to keep kids from impaling themselves. But then again, it’s cool that the Museum trusts people to not be complete idiots, because to have to guard visitors against observing the work close-up would be to compromise the art; at least that’s what I think.

Map of Atlantis

According to Artist Alan Rapp, “The tons of shattered glass forming Map of Broken Glass (Atlantis) (1969) are layered both literally and figuratively. As the title implies, the sculpture is to be seen not simply as a pile of flat, sharp, transparent fragments but also as a map of a legendary lost continent (almost certainly, however, a fictional one).

Smithson’s work suggests that the concrete materiality of sculpture depends on the mind’s ability to see metaphorically in order to comprehend meanings within the language of art. The resulting gaps are passageways akin to Alice’s Looking Glass or the Bellman’s blank map, in that they are thresholds to an elsewhere.”

Map of Atlantis

Robert  Smithson died in a plane crash on July 20, 1973, while surveying sites for his work Amarillo Ramp in the vicinity of Amarillo, Texas. He was just 35 years old. What a shame and great loss to the art world, and the world in general. Despite his early death, and relatively few surviving major works, Smithson has a following amongst many contemporary artists. The Dia: Beacon has an entire large gallery dedicated to his work, and there are perhaps six or seven of his earthworks on display. You should go see them.

Robert Smithson Signage

Super Mario Clouds By Cory Arcangel

Super Mario Clouds
Photo By Gail

For this installation, entitled Super Mario Clouds (2002), Cory Arcangel hacked into and modified a cartridge of a Super Mario Bros, the blockbuster Nintendo videogame released in the United States in 1985. By tweaking the game’s code, the artist erased all of the audio and visual elements except for the iconic, fluffy white clouds that scroll endlessly across the bright blue sky.

Arcangel, who is trained as a musician, considers computers and video game consoles as his instruments; he will often learn a new programming language in order to develop an artwork. Viewers cannot handle the console on display here, but they can model their own version: Arcangel provides detailed instructions as well as the code for re-creating this project on his website.

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Creepy Art: Clownmirror (2) By Roni Horn

Clownmirror 2
Photo By Gail

Seriously, how fucking creepy is this thing? Who knew it was possible to make pictures of clowns that look even scarier than real clowns?

P1090649

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Summer Group Show at Joseph Gross Gallery!

Installation View with Shark Gun
Gun Shark! (All Photos By Gail)

You only have until August 1st to see the really fun — and diverse — summer group show up now at the Joseph Gross Gallery. The exhibit features a few of our favorite artists, including Ron English, Sebastian Wahl and Joseph Grazi, plus a lot cool new stuff from artists we didn’t previously know, including: Alex Yanes, Alison Mosshart, Ben Venom, Dave White, Diane Munoz, Eric Inkala, Etai Rahmil, James Charles, Jet Martinez, Jessica Hess, John Felix Arnold III, Pam Glew, Peter Gronquist, Rune Christensen, Jessica Hess, Sergio Garcia, Christopher Schulz, Tahiti Pehrson and Ted Lincoln.

Here are a few of our favorite pieces from the show!

Glass Trumpet

Glass Trumpet Sculpture

Hexagonal Wall Sculpture

Sebastian Wahl

Collage pieces by Sebastian Wahl.

Geometric Painting

I love the vibrant colors and geometric shapes in this painting.

Blue Frame

Whoever made the decision to put this one in a blue frame made the right choice.

Ron English

Painting and Sculptures by Ron English.

Darth Vader

Darth Vader’s likeness inlaid into a slab of wood. Very nice!

Shark Guns

Shark Guns! Yes!

Installation View with Bike

More Cool Stuff!

Napoleon Dynamite

I especially enjoyed the collection of five dollar bills modified with images and sayings few various Pop Culture Icons. Above, Napoleon Dynamite.

Alec

And Malcolm McDowell as Alec from A Clockwork Orange, plus there are a bunch more.

Be sure to stop by before they take this stuff down because it is a must-see show!

The Joseph Gross Gallery is Located at 548 W 28th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Charlie Hewitt’s Urban Rattle Sculpture Near the High Line

Charlie Hewitt Urban Rattle Sculpture
Photos By Gail

I went walking on the High Line today and saw this fantastic modern abstract sculpture, which is just adjacent to the park, having been installed on the patio of  a luxury rental complex known as Ten23, located between 22nd & 23rd Street on Tenth Avenue. The 20-foot high sculpture is called Urban Rattle, and it’s by American artist Charlie Hewitt.

Urban Rattle

Soundsuit By Nick Cave

Sound Suit by Nick Cave
Photos By Gail

This Soundsuit (2008), embellished with fake flowers and leaves, transforms the human body into an ornate still life. Nick Cave took a traditional genre of painting and reshaped it into a contemporary sculpture with the potential to come to life. Cave has been fabricating these sculptures since the early 1990s.

Made to be worn, each Soundsuit allows the wearer to try on a new identity. The suit draws on various cultural and religious rituals ranging from ceremonial African dances to Christian services, masking the identities of the wearers and making them assume the persona of the costume.

Sound Suit Rear View
Soundsuit Rear Gallery View

Jonathan LeVine Gallery Presents Trifecta Group Show!

Sandra Chevrier Installation View
Art By Sandra Chevrier (All Photos By Gail)

Yesterday was one those perfect summer days here in Manhattan, so we went for a leisurely walk on the High Line, stopping in at a few of our favorite galleries, including Jonathan LeVine, where we enjoyed their current Trifecta Group Show. Trifecta showcases three international female artists — Handiedan, Mimi Scholz, and Sandra Chevrier — who are at the forefront of a contemporary art movement with art that reimagines representations of women. Through an array of media, these artists use the female figure as their subject and are strong voices for a new generation of artists. Curator Yasha Young offers, “This exhibition addresses the fact that art created by women has been historically dismissed as craft as opposed to fine art, affecting the development of women in art throughout history. I would like to open doors for women artists and encourage them to step out and up.”

Sandra Chevrier

The show fills all three galleries rooms, one dedicated to each artist. In the largest, main space you can see a collection of work by Montreal-based artist Sandra Chevrier, who merges painting and collage in works that reflect upon the self-imposed limitations within our world and the underlying tragedy of oppressed female identity. In her series Cages, finely hand-painted portraits of women are masked with pages from comic books, symbolizing the struggle of having to uphold unrealistic expectations of beauty and perfection.

Sandra Chevrier

By imposing these strict limitations society is placing women in prisons of identity and asking them to become superheroes. In the greater body of her work, the images used within ‘cages’ range from scenes of conflict, triumph and defeat. Often focusing on the latter, the artist highlights the fragility of the superhero, their personal weaknesses and exposes the humanity within the superhuman.

Mimi Sholz

Mimi Scholz is based in Berlin and creates digital paintings that sarcastically comment on clichés regarding the female psyche and sexuality.

Mimi Sholz

Starting with a detailed sketch and then using a tablet to add multiple layers of color, her compositions are printed on canvas and have an airbrushed quality that closely resembles oil painting.

Mimi Sholz

Known for her subject matter of “unpredictable women with attitude” and often accompanied by strange creatures, her works are set in a manically imagined world where the lines between good and evil, sane and insane are blurred. We really love her work and her Dark Pop sensibilities!

Handian

Dutch artist Handiedan pushes mixed-media collage to a higher level by digitally creating classic female pin-ups using ornamental components such as currencies, sheet music and her own cartoon drawings. Handiedan rebuilds these digital designs into multi-layered hand-cut collages that end up with a distinctive three-dimensional quality. Her pin-ups look like something between an orientally adorned femme fatale from a noir film, a sexually joyful pin-up from a 1950’s calendar and a tattooed rockabilly girl. Each work is a treasure trove of symbols, with a focus on cosmology, Eastern philosophy and sacred geometries.

Trifecta Group Exhibition, Featuring Art by Handiedan, Mimi Scholz, and Sandra Chevrier, will be on Exhibit Through July 25, 2015 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.