Tag Archive | Artist

Tatiana Trouvé’s Desire Lines in Central Park

Desire Lines
All Photos By Gail

For her first public commission in the United States, Tatiana Trouvé (b. 1968, Cosenza, Italy) has made a work that responds to Central Park. She came to see the miles of pedestrian paths that traverse its landscape as similar to the arteries of a living being. There’s no singular way to walk through the park, but rather a multitude of possible routes that may be followed according to our own desires.

Desire Lines Black Spools

Desire Lines Black Spools

Drawing on existing maps, Trouvé isolated all of the marked pathways in the park and estimated their distances. She identified 212, from secluded paths to prominent thoroughfares, ranging in length from around 60 feet to four miles. Translating her research into three-dimensional form, Trouvé created three large-scale storage racks that house a total of 212 spools.

Desire Lines Green Spools

Each spool is wound with rope equivalent in length to a corresponding pathway and labeled to identify its location in the park.

Desire Lines Pink and Purple Spools

Tatiana Trouvé’s work is also a reflection on the broader cultural significance of walking. It’s an activity that ranges from personal recreation to political statement, and has inspired poets, musicians, writers, and artists. Thus, the artist has associated each pathway with a title drawn from culture and history that relates to walking. In this way, Desire Lines is both a systematic inventory of the park and an invitation to explore the political and poetic resonance of the simple act of taking a walk.

Desire Lines Pink Spools

Desire Lines Pink Spool Detail

Desire Lines by Tatiana Trouvé (curated by Nicholas Baume) is on Exhibit Through Sunday August 230, 2105 at Fifth Avenue and 60th Street. Make sure you head into the Park for some exploring after you view it, because it’s gorgeous out there!

Central Park

Desire Lines Green Spools

Last Rites Gallery Presents Transfigure Group Show

Sarah Joncas Otherworldly
Sarah Joncas Otherworldly (All Photos By Gail)

Last Rites Gallery is currently hosting Transfigure, a group exhibition featuring new paintings by Sarah Joncas (whose work we first saw at Last Rites way back in 2011), along with Alex Garant, and husband and wife collaborative duo Kit King and Corey Popp, known creatively as Oda & King. This is a fresh group of artists that are bringing something cool and dark to contemporary portraiture.

Last Rites Installation View

Oda & King Creation
Oda & King, Creation

Transfigure explores the overall theme of transforming one idea into something more beautiful or elaborate. The shared goal is to inspire discussion which bridges the gap between styles, mediums and other aesthetic factors existing within the realm of artistry.

Alex Garant

For this exhibition, each artist has chosen to move beyond his or her central medium and explore the convolution of experiences, which stem from the creative process. Alex Garant has painted a collection of women’s traditional portraits with a surreal edge; where each subject not only appears to have Multiple Eyes, but multiple countenances, entirely. The painting above, of a young girl holding her pet rabbit, is absolutely astounding.

Alex Garant, Boudoir
Alex Garant, Boudoir

Oda & King, Our Little Secret
Oda & King, Our Little Secret

My eyes sting just looking at this one.

Sarah Joncas Wither
Sarah Joncas, Wither

Oda & King Refugee
Oda & King, Refugee

This presentation of shifting techniques examines the complex relationship amongst artists, object, and form as well as the formative innovations that occur when one decides to move beyond their comfort zone.

Transfigure will be on Exhibit through October 3rd, 2015 at Last Rites Gallery, Located at 325 West 38th Street (between 8th and 9th Avenues) in NYC.

Sarah Joncas Schizogony

Skate Decks By Cacho Falcon

Skate Decks by Cacho Falcon
All Photos By Gail

These skateboard decks, featuring highly stylized likenesses of (left to right) Freddie Mercury, Jackie O as Marilyn Monroe, and President Barack Obama, were created by designer/painter Cacho Falcon.

Photographed in Three Monkeys Eyewear on Spring Street.

Three Money Eyewear Signage

Video: Tim Hawkinson’s Gimbled Klein Basket at Pace Gallery



Artist Tim Hawkinson explores the fourth dimension with his 2007 Gimbled Klein Basket, which creates an analog rendering of an impossible object. With a porous, gridded bamboo structure, Hawkins then recreated the Klein Bottle and suspended it from the ceiling like a Calder mobile, envisioning an object which is at once knowable, and of another dimension. This video was created at the Pace Gallery on W. 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, as part of the Eureka exhibit, which has now closed.

Girl On a Chair By George Segal

Girl on a Chair
All Photos By Gail

George Segal (1924 – 2000) was an innovator in sculpture known for his installations of white plaster figures with ghostly appearances. He depicted the dignity in everyday life, showing people poised at a bus stop, paused before a Traffic Intersection, or conversing on a park bench. Segal’s work also took on political themes such as the Holocaust and gay pride. At the time the Girl On a Chair (1970) sculpture was created, the artist discussed its art historical references:

“The chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house, the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof…I’ve always liked the hardness and softness combined, this wedding of organic and geometric.”

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Girl on a Chair

Cityscape Fountains By Victor Scallo

City Fountains By Victor Scallo
All Photos By Gail

Sculptor Victor Scallo created this sculpture that consists of four rectangular stainless steel blocks, which are meant to represent nearby buildings in the Financial District.

City Fountains By Victor Scallo

There isn’t any water in the fountain at the moment, but when there is, there are five nozzles (visible in the photos above) located near the surface of the pool that spray water upwards into the air. Cityscape Fountains (1969) stands outside the plaza on 77 Water Street (adjacent to Front Street and Gouverneur Lane).

City Fountains By Victor Scallo

Lucas Samaras, Doorway

Lucas Samaras Doorway Full
All Photos By Gail

While Lucas Samaras’s Doorway is billed as a “Mirrored Room,” it isn’t actually a room that you can enter, as you can, say, a Mirrored Room installation by Yayoi Kusama. It is really more of, well, a Doorway: a Mirrored Cube inside of a Mirrored Shell that is open on the front and back ends, to allow view through. When I viewed this work at Pace Gallery on the final day of its exhibition, the open ends were roped off to prevent anyone from touching, walking on or accessing the work close up. Bummer.

Lucas Samaras Doorway 1

In this shot you can see the outline of the cube clearly. Unfortunately, if there is even one other person in the gallery they are going be in the shot.

Lucas Samaras Doorway Detail

This a reflection of the cube against the interior of the passageway. You can imagine that if you were able to get inside there you could snap some pretty crazy selfies.  But, sadly no.

Lucas Samaras Doorway Full

Doorway is one of a series of Mirrorred Rooms created by Samaras between 1966 and 2007.

Photographed At Pace Gallery, 510 West 25th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Lucas Samaras Doorway Signage