Tag Archive | Artist

Glass Bambi

Glass Bambi
All Photos By Gail

While on an Art Safari at The Met this past weekend, we discovered the rare Glass Bambi, which is actually called PixCell-Deer #24, created in 2011 by Japanese artist Kohei Nawa as part of his Heisei period works. Glass Bambi was realized by covering a full sized Taxidermied Deer with variably sized artificial crystal glass beads, called PixCells, a term coined by the artist. PixCell combines the idea of a Pixel — the smallest unit of a digital image — with that of a Cell. Clever.

Glass Bambi

Whether intentionally or unintentionally on the part of Nawa, PixCell-Deer #24 resonates with a type of religious painting known as a Kasuga Deer Mandala, which features a Deer — the messenger animal of Shinto Deities —   posed similarly, with its head turned to the side, and with a round  sacred mirror on its back.

Glass Bambi Detail
In Japanese art, the Deer is often depicted as a companion of ancient sages, and has auspicious and poetic associations

Glass Bambi Head

Glass Bambi is part of Discovering Japanese Art: American Collectors and the Met in Galleries 223–232, on Exhibit Through September 27, 2015 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC!

Cat with Laser Vision Needlepoint

Cat with Laser Vision Needlepoint
Photo By Gail

The other evening, when we were at the Joseph Gross Gallery for the Joseph Grazi exhibit, we could not help but also visit the Into the Wild exhibit taking place at Art Now NY Gallery, because, basically, they share a space. I took this photo of an apparent Cat with Laser Vision done with Needlepoint, but am unable to credit the artist because there were no little plaques or stickers with identifying info next to each artwork. And you know how annoying that can be for an anal retentive blogger like myself. If you are the maker of this piece, or know who is, please enlighten me in the comments, thanks!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Kazimir Malevich, Suprematist Painting

Suprematist Painting
Photo By Gail

Kazimir Malevich (February 23, 1879 – May 15, 1935) was a Russian painter and art theoretician. He was a pioneer of geometric abstract art and the originator of the avant-garde, Suprematist movement, which he founded in December of 1915.

Suprematism, named thus because Malevich’s new style claimed supremacy over the forms of nature, unveiled a radically new mode of abstract painting that abandoned all reference to the outside world in favor of colored geometric shapes floating against white backgrounds. Since Suprematism rejected the deliberate illusions of representational painting, Malevich saw it as a form of realism — “new painterly realism” was his term — and understood its subject to be the basic components of painting’s language, such as color, line, and brushwork. The basic units of this visual vocabulary were planes, stretched, rotated, and overlapping. For the artist, the white backgrounds against which they were set mapped the boundless space of the ideal.

Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist Painting (1916 – 17) is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Paula Hayes Gazing Globes in Madison Square Park

Gazing Globes
All Photos By Gail

Discovering cool public art in NYC is part of what makes being an art lover in this city so rewarding. Even though they have been up since February 19th, I just read about Paula Hayes’ Gazing Globes installation in Madison Square Park last week, and with less than a month left to check it out, I felt encouraged by the promise of less frigid weather to head over there this past weekend.

Gazing Globe
Gazing Globe
Gazing Globe Interior Close Up

The work features eighteen transparent polycarbonate spheres that hold the remnants of contemporary culture, including up-cycled radio parts, industrial materials, acrylic wands, and other pieces of vintage technology sprinkled with fairy dust made of pulverized CDs. In this way, Hayes is using new materials and adding fresh content to her objects while retaining some of the form of her well-known plant terrariums.

Mad Square Park View

The heights of the pedestals varies, which adds a keen visual dynamic as well. It is like walking into a magical fairy land!

Gazing Globe Gazing Globe Interior Close Up

Each see-through globe lit from within features a mixture of analog radio parts, castoff electronic transistor parts, glass vacuum tubes, micro glass beads, shredded rubber tires, and recycled plastic flotsam. To these mixed remnants of technology and culture the artist added crystals and minerals.

CD Dust

A shimmering fairy dust was made from pulverized CDs and is layered within each sculpture’s interior. Hayes, who typically works with varieties of plant materials, determined that everyday castoffs are indicative of a society’s behavior and value system and symptomatic of the current landscape.

Gazing Globe Pink

The artist states, “I used vintage parts because technology moves at such a fast pace. These play a role in the current landscape and how information is transmitted from one part of the globe to the next. I made an illuminated landscape evocative of the designed landscape of Madison Square Park. Both are born of human imagination and technology.”

Since the Globes are illuminated, the optimal viewing time is at dusk or, ideally, in the dark. We arrived maybe 20 minutes before full sunset, but due to being underdressed for a sudden temperature drop, we were just too cold to remain outside any longer.

Globes

Gazing Globes by Paula Hayes’s will be on view through April 19th, 2015 at the West Gravel area of Madison Square Park, Located on the North East Lot at Intersection of 23rd Street and Broadway, New York City.

Oh, The Places We Have Been Group Show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Jeff Soto, Love Can Surpass All Obstacles
Jeff Soto, Love Can Surpass All Obstacles (All Photos by Gail)

Jonathan LeVine Gallery is currently hosting Oh, The Places We Have Been: Rediscovering the Past, a group exhibition at their 23rd Street space, featuring work by the following 33 artists who have helped shape the foundation of the gallery over the last ten years: AJ Fosik, Alex Gross, Amandine Urruty, Andrew Brandou, Andy Kehoe, Blek le Rat, Brett Amory, Dan Witz, Esao Andrews, Fabio D’Aroma, Gary Baseman, Gary Taxali, Jeff Soto, Jim Houser, Juan Francisco Casas, Kevin Cyr, Marc Giai-Miniet, Marco Mazzoni, Masakatsu Sashie, Mike Giant, Natalia Fabia, Nouar, Nychos, Olek, Paul Insect, Rafael Silveira, Sam Gibbons, Saner, Souther Salazar, Tara McPherson, Titi Freak, Victor Castillo, WK Interact.

Kevin Cyr and Esao Andrews
(Left) Kevin Cyr, Köpenicker (Right) Esao Andrews, The Guarded Fairground

Natalia Fabia, Kate is Great and Rainbow Cake
Natalia Fabia, Kate is Great and Rainbow Cake

Oh, The Places We Have Been: Rediscovering the Past is a continuation of the gallery’s tenth anniversary celebration and highlights a diverse group of artists who have been integral to our programming since our doors opened in 2005.

Masakatsu Sashie, Toadstool
Masakatsu Sashie, Toadstool

Jim Houser
Four Works by Jim Houser

We always get nostalgic at LeVine’s group shows, having discovered so much excellent art and had so much fun at their events over the years.

Marco Mazzoni, Olek, Sam Gibbons
Left to Right: Marco Mazzoni, Olek, Sam Gibbons

Victor Castillo, Point of Entry
Victor Castillo, Point of Entry

Over the last decade Jonathan LeVine Gallery has exhibited over 300 artists. This exhibition pays tribute to the new and familiar faces we have seen along the way and showcases some significant works from our archives. Oh, The Places We Have Been is a retrospective of JLG’s past with an eye toward the future.

Andrew Brandou, Black Swan
Andrew Brandou, Black Swan

Oh, The Places We Have Been: Rediscovering the Past Group Exhibition will be on View Through May 2nd, 2015, at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 557C West 23rd Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Gary Taxali and Souther Salazar
(Left) Gary Taxali, Zoom (Right) Souther Salazar, It’s Like We’re in a Dream

Elizabeth Dee Gallery Presents: John Giorno, Space Forgets You

Prefer Crying in a Limo
All Photos By Gail (Click on Any Image to Enlarge for Detail)

I think I can safely say that every single time I’ve stumbled across a cool exhibit at Elizabeth Dee Gallery, located just off 11th Avenue on 20th Street, it’s not only because I’m on my way to a gallery located a bit further east, but because I recognize a piece of art in the window as one I’ve seen at Frieze Art Fair. This indicates that the artists they represent are truly memorable, because Frieze is massive. My point being, I stopped in to Elizabeth Dee on Saturday because I recognized the artwork of John Giorno, who creates text-based paintings of bold, thought provoking slogans originally sourced from poetry that the artist has written, or lines that never made it into a final poem. It’s amazing to see that, at age 79, John Giorno continues to create works that speak so poignantly to a contemporary audience.

God is Man Made

In this series, entitled Space Forgets You, Giorno presents his paintings in three different styles: in vibrant, rainbow-hued paints, as pastel water colors, and earth-toned graphite drawings. Although many of the sayings are repeated over the various groups, the method by which each was created definitely affects ones perception of the message.

Pastel Room

One gallery room is dedicated to the water colors.

Beige Room

Another displays all of the smaller, graphite drawings.

Bad News

My favorites in this series are the rainbow colored paintings. This one I’ve seen at Frieze, but done with black paint on a white canvas.

Thanx 4 Nothing

It always gives me great satisfaction to use this phrase, for some reason.

Party for the Gods

This one is great. It should be on a T-Shirt.

Life is a Killer

So true.

John Giorno’s Space Forgets You will be on Exhibit Through May 9th, 2015, at Elizabeth Dee Gallery, Located at 545 West 20th Street at Eleventh Avenue (West Side Highway), in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Lilac Gallery Presents Alexo Wandael’s Revealing Muses

Muse
All Photos By Gail

Lilac Gallery in the Flatiron District is currently hosting a visually vibrant exhibit by Italian fine art and fashion photographer Alexo Wandael, entitled Revealing Muses.

This new collection of photographs is comprised of selections from three of the artist’s previous series: Light Emphasis, Heim Muse, and Veils. Here are some of out favorite photographs from the show!

Mannequin Muses

Photos from the Heim Muse series, featuring Mannequins as subjects.

Mannequin Muses

Double Muse

Selections from the Light Emphasis series.

Gypsy Muse

Bob Muse

This one is my favorite.

Muse Trio

Selections from the Veil series.

Muse Red

Read more about this show and the work of Alexo Wandael, and see more photos from the exhibit, at This Link.

Alexo Wandael’s Revealing Muses will be on exhibit through April 30th, 2015 at Lilac Gallery, Located at 144 5th Avenue, 2nd Floor (Between 19th and 20th Streets) New York, NY 10011. hours are Monday – Friday 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM.

Revealing Muses Signage