Tag Archive | Artist

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Photos By Gail

The above pictured sculpture, Suspended Objects (2011) was created by artist Hassan Sharif from countless long strands made up of multi-colored yarns, twine, string and wire, tied together and also wrapped around bits of plastic, foam and other found objects. It’s super colorful and reminds me of a big Jellyfish.

Suspended Objects is part of the Here and Elsewhere group show now on exhibit at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, previously discussed in this post, so click that link for more information!

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Suspended Objects (Detail)

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Jasper Johns, Flag

Jaser Johns Flag
Flag By Jasper Johns, 1954, Encaustic, Oil, and Collage on Fabric mounted on Plywood, Three Panels (Photo By Gail)

From Moma Dot Org:

“One night I dreamed that I painted a large American flag,” Johns has said of this work, “and the next morning I got up and I went out and bought the materials to begin it.” Those materials included three canvases that he mounted on plywood, strips of newspaper, and encaustic paint—a mixture of pigment and molten wax that has formed a surface of lumps and smears.

The newspaper scraps visible beneath the stripes and forty-eight stars lend this icon historical specificity. The American flag is something “the mind already knows,” Johns has said, but its execution complicates the representation and invites close inspection. A critic of the time encapsulated this painting’s ambivalence, asking, “Is this a flag or a painting?”

Jasper Johns was born May 15th, 1930 and currently lives in Sharon, Connecticut. Flag is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bridget Riley Blaze I

Bridget Riley Blaze 1
Bridget Riley, Blaze 1, 1962 (Photo By Gail)

While at Goldsmith’s College in London, Bridget Riley (born 1931) became interested in the optical vibrations initiated by Georges Seurat’s Pointillist technique of the 1880s. By 1961, Riley was painting solely in Black and White, and her paintings of the early 1960s are pioneering examples of what came to be known as Op Art.

With Blaze 1 (1962), Riley applied black zigzag stripes of emulsion to a white ground to create a pattern that assaults the eye: the bands of paint create a corkscrew–like optical effect wherein the two-dimensional painting appears to both recede into the wall and to project itself into space in front of the picture plane.

Bridget Riley’s Blaze 1 is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Match Box Art By Mohamed Larbi Rahali

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art
All Photos By Gail

These tiny collages, drawings and mixed-media works all represented on Match Boxes are part of the series called Omri (My Life) by Moroccan artist Mohamed Larbi Rahali.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Omri is included in Here and Elsewhere, the comprehensive group exhibit currently inhabiting The New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Here and Elsewhere is a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world, and brings together more than forty-five artists from over fifteen countries.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

These photos capture just a fraction of the hundreds of Match Boxes in Mohamed Larbi Rahali‘s piece, and the work is still ongoing.

Watch for more posts featuring art from Here and Elsewhere on the gig in the upcoming week.

Here and Elsewhere is on Exhibit Through September 28th, 2014, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, located at 235 Bowery (at Prince street) in Soho, NYC.

Mohamed Rahali Match Box Art

Modern Art Monday Presents: The Absolutely Naked Fragrance By John McCracken

Pink Plank McCracken
The Absolutely Naked Fragrance, 1967, Plywood Covered with Fiberglass and Resin By John McCracken (All Photos By Gail)

John McCracken (American, 1934–2011) began producing his vibrant monochrome Planks in 1966. While the polished resin surface captures the aesthetic of surfing and car culture unique to Southern California in the 1960s, the title — The Absolutely Naked Fragrance — was drawn from advertising slogans in fashion magazines.

The work’s interaction with both the floor and wall is meant to call attention to the space occupied in the gallery by both viewer and object.

“I see the plank as existing between two worlds,” McCracken said. “The floor representing the physical world of standing objects, trees, cars, buildings, human bodies, and everything, and the wall representing the world of the imagination, illusionistic painting space, human mental space and all that.”

The Absolutely Naked Fragrance is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City

John McCracken Artist
Photo of a Photo of The Artist, By Gail

Alice Cooper Eye Sculpture by Scott Stevens

Alice Cooper Eye Sculpture
Artwork and Photo By Scott Stevens

In a backyard garden in Austin, Texas, lush with native succulents and clusters of Baby Doll Heads on Sticks, artist Scott Stevens has built a unique totem to his favorite musical performer, Alice Cooper. Scott has given Worleygig.com an exclusive on this larger than life representation of Cooper’s iconic eye makeup and how the sculpture came to be.

“I started with a discarded metal fence pole set in a concrete plug,” Scott explains. “Once that was in the ground, I cast a concrete footer around the plug for stability. I used found metal pieces, lathing, tar paper, and lots of bell wire to tie it all together. To create the form I used Portland cement mixed with sand on top of the armature (metal framework). I learned a lot about methods and materials while putting the sculpture together.”

“The totem changes color — ranging from blue green to blackish, depending on the time of day and on the position of the sun. Although Alice’s makeup is black, I didn’t want a big black piece in the middle of all the green cacti. Home Depot pulled through for me again with an exterior satin latex that was mixed to match Liquitex Green Permanent Deep. I dug the hole on Feb 1st and finished painting on July 5th, 2014.

Scott continues that, “It was truly a labor of love – during which I battled loads of mosquitoes! I had been working on drawings of the idea for years and I was motivated to build it this year because Alice was playing a show here in Austin on July 15th (on his tour with Motley Crüe) and I was hoping he would come to visit my yard! I saw him also in Dallas on the 16th – he blew the Crüe off the stage at both stows – and will see him again in Houston on October 11th.”

Porca Miseria! Chandelier at MOMA

Porca Miseria! Chandelier Distance
All Photos By Gail

The Porca Miseria! Chandelier is a revolt against the “slickness” of contemporary design and designer  Ingo Maurer’s celebration of slow–motion cinematic explosions. Only 10 of these lamps are produced annually, as four builders and must work on each one for almost 5 days, carefully breaking plates with a hammer or dropping them on the floor to determine the arrangement of the final design. The title, a common Italian interjection similar to “damn,” expressing irritation, surprise, annoyance, or incredulity, evokes both the frustration of breaking a dish and the release that comes from breaking many of them.

Porca Miseria! Chandelier

Porca Miseria! Chandelier

Porca Miseria! is on exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in the Design Gallery.

Must See Art: Jeff Koons Retrospective at The Whitney Museum

Jeff Koons Retrospective Signage
Jeff Koons Retrospective Signage Depicting Michael Jackson and Bubbles Sculpture from the Banality Series (All Photos By Gail)

It is no secret that Jeff Koons is one of my most-loved artists. A lot of haters take issue with the fact that Koons is so rich and successful, like that is a bad, thing. I say, if a billionaire wants to pay $58 million dollars for one of his Balloon Dog sculptures, good for him. Good for everybody! If I had $58 Million to blow on some rad artwork, I would do the same thing. Jeff Koons!

Jeff Koons is currently the subject of a retrospective at The Whitney Museum, surveying the full scope of his career, and it is a must see show. Comprised of almost 150 objects dating from 1978 to the present, this exhibition is the most comprehensive ever devoted to Koons’ Artwork, his first major museum presentation in New York, and the first to fill nearly the entire Marcel Breuer-designed Whitney building with a single artist’s work. The Koons Retrospective will also be the final exhibition to take place there before the Whitney opens its new building in the Meatpacking District in 2015 — but what a way to go!

Mail Box with Gazing Ball
Gazing Ball Series (2013)

The Koons Retrospective fills four floors of the building including the lobby, plus the lower level (adjacent to the restaurant) and the small outdoor “garden.” The work is organized chronologically with his newest work, which includes the Gazing Ball series that debuted at the David Zwirner Gallery last year, in a lobby adjacent gallery. Geoffrey and I started on the 4th floor and worked our way down.

Non-flash photography is allowed (thank god) and I took about 100 photos. Here are some highlights from the show!

Inflatable Flowers
Inflatable Flowers

The Inflatables Series (1978–79) features works that look like weightless, air-filled plastic flowers, though the works are made of stainless Steel.

Light Mounted Toaster
Toaster Mounted on Lit Base

Pre-New (1979–80) includes a series of small, counter top kitchen appliances mounted on deco-style lit bases.

Red Telephone
Red Telephone, Pre-New Series

I never thought I would live in an era where some people will neither know how the above object is used, nor understand the significance of its red color.

Vacuum Cleaners
Vacuum Cleaners, New Series

The News Series (1980–87) features billboard-sized product adverts as well as a large collection of sculptures comprised of early model vacuum cleaners encased in vitrines lit by fluorescent tubing. These works reminded me favorably of The Carousel of Progress attraction at Disneyland.

Vacuum Cleaner Gallery View
New Series Gallery View

Basketballs in a Tank
Three Basketballs in a Tank, Equilibrium Series (1983–93)

Frangelico Ad
Frangelico Ad, Luxury and Degradation Series (1986)

Baccarat Crystal Cocktail Set
Baccarat Crystal Cocktail Service Set, Luxury and Degradation Series

Mermaid Sculpture
Mermaid, Statuary Series (1986)

Bob Hope Statue
Bob Hope, Statuary Series

Banality Series Gallery
Banality Series (1988) Installation View

Surprised Bather
Surprised Bather, Banality Series

Gilded Mirror
Gilt Mirror, Banality Series

Made in Heaven Signage
Made in Heaven Series (1989–91)

Between 1989 and 1991, Koons and his then wife, Italian Porn star and Politician Cicciolina, posed for a series of sexually explicit artworks that became the Made in Heaven Series and Coffee Table Book. While Koons and Cicciolina are unbelievably hot and fun to look at, some of these photos show lots of Peen and Vajayjay, so you are going to want to keep any kids out of the galleries that are labeled “Sexually Explicit Material/Not for Children” or something similar.

Made in Heaven
Made In Heaven Series

Koons Bust with Crystals
Koons Bust with Crystals, Made in Heaven Series

Made in Heaven Amethyst Sculpture
Made In Heaven Series Amethyst Sculpture

Pink Cake
Pink Cake, Celebration Series (1994 Onward)

The Celebration Series gallery is probably my favorite in the entire exhibit.

Purple Heart
Purple Heart, Celebration Series

Giant Pile of Play Doh
Play-Doh with Balloon Dog in the Background, Celebration Series

Pink Button
Pink Button with Random Gallery Visitor, Included for Scale, Celebration Series

Purple Giraffe Mirror
Purple Giraffe Silhouette Mirror, Easyfun Series (1999–2000)

Mirror Reflected in a Mirror
Easyfun Series

Betty Page and Dolphin
Easyfun-Ethereal Series (2000–02)

Lunch Meat Faces with Mustache
Easyfun-Ethereal Series

Beach Chairs and Seals
Seal Walrus (Chairs) Sculpture (Foreground), Elvis (Background), Popeye Series (2002 Onward)

Inflatable Lobster
Lobster, Popeye Series

Hulk Organ
Hulk (Organ), Hulk Elvis Series (2004–14)

Yellow Mirrored Sculpture
Pluto and Proserpina, Antiquity Series (2013 Onward)

Balloon Venus
Balloon Venus (Orange), Antiquity Series

I know there are a ton of photos in this post, but consider that they represent only one tenth of what’s in the exhibit and you know you gotta go check this out! I’ll be going back at least once more. Helpful Hint to Avoid Crowds: Try to get to The Whitney by 12 Noon or earlier on a weekend. Although crowds are unpredictable, an early arrival made the difference between waiting on line just inside the lobby when we arrived a line that went outside and around the block when we left!

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective Will be on Exhibit Through October 19th, 2014, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Located at 945 Madison Avenue (at 75th Street) in NYC. The exhibition then travels to the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Paris (November 26, 2014–April 27, 2015) and to the Guggenheim Bilbao (June 5–September 27, 2015).

A Spectacle and Nothing Strange By Eve Fowler at MOMA

A Spectacle and Nothing Strange
All Photos By Gail

In 2011,  American artist Eve Fowler began A Spectacle and Nothing Strange, which quotes fragments of Gertrude Stein’s groundbreaking feminist prose works Tender Buttons (1914) and How to Write (1931) on twenty–one posters produced by the Colby Poster Printing Company.

Anyone Telling Anything

Colby’s posters – known for their block-printed text over saccharine color gradients – were a common part of the Los Angeles landscape from the company’s founding, 60 years ago, until it closed, in 2012. Fowler’s posters were made using fonts and colors selected at random by the printer.

There are the ones who do see me

A Spectacle and Nothing Strange By Eve Fowler is on view at the Museum of Modern Art, NYC through September 28th, 2014.

A Difference of Very Little Difference

Very Different but Much More

Wide Shot

It is So

The Difference is Spreading