Tag Archive | Artist

Modern Art Monday Presents: John Chamberlain, Dorkdorf

John Chamberlain Dorkdorf
All Photos By Gail

I didn’t get turned on to the unique sculptural style of John Chamberlain until his Spring 2012 Retrospective at The Guggenheim, at which point Chamberlain had only recently passed away. Chamberlain was best known for his dynamic sculptures created with scrap metal from salvaged cars, which are held in many public collections.

John Chamberlain Dorkdorf 2

This piece, Dorkdorf (1988) is made from painted and chrome-plated steel and is very representative of his style. At this time this photo was taken (July 2014) it was on exhibit in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, though the piece is privately owned, so there is no telling how long it will remain on public view.

John Chamberlain was considered to be a master of creative re-use and he continues to inspire many artists to use found metal in their art. He died at his home in Manhattan on December 20th, 2011 at the age of 84.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Ellsworth Kelly, Spectrum V

Ellsworth Kelly Spectrum V
Photo By Gail

I want you to appreciate that I had to wait patiently for about 15 minutes for a child and her oblivious mom to stop effing around in front of this 13 panel color fied installation that makes up legendary minimalist Ellsworth Kelly’s Spectrum V (1969) before I could get this photo. You’re welcome.

Ellsworth Kelly (born May 31, 1923) is an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker associated with hard-edge painting, Color Field painting and the minimalist school. His works demonstrate unassuming techniques emphasizing simplicity of form, similar to the work of John McLaughlin and Kenneth Noland. Kelly often employs bright colors. He lives and works in Spencertown, New York.

Spectrum V, a gift of the artist, is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Qalandia 2087 by Wafna Hourani at the New Museum

Qalandia 2087
All Photos By Gail

One of my favorite pieces from the Here and Elsewhere, group exhibit currently up at the New Museum of Contemporary Art is a mixed media installation called Qalandia 2087 by Palestinian artist Wafa Hourani.

Qalandia

Qalandia 2087 fills nearly an entire gallery at the museum and is lots of fun to explore while contemplating the political and sociological ramifications of the piece, especially considering what is going on in that part of the world at this very moment in time.

Qalandia 2087

Here is some information I found on the piece at Nadour Dot Org:

Built from cardboard boxes and archive photographs, Qalandia 2087(2009) is the third and last part of a series of installations by Wafa Hourani.

Qalandia

The artist reproduced, as an architectural model, one of main check-points and Palestinian refugee camps. Located in the north of Jerusalem, Qalandia constitutes, since 1949, Ramallah’s entrance and the exit point, dividing the country on its western bank.

Qalandia 2087

Hourani was interested in this particular place in the Palestinian history, because of its proximity with its own airport, transformed into military base during the Israeli occupation. This paradox of a territory, initially connected to the rest of the world and now a place for Palestinian isolation, illustrates the politico-social reality of the country.

Qalanida 2087 Rose Courtyard

Qalanida 2087 Rose Courtyard Detail

In Qalandia 2087, the artist proposes a futuristic vision of this place, a hundred years after the first Intifada. Contrary to the first two pieces in the series, which presented an apocalyptic vision of Qalandia – a hundred years after the exodus Palestinian for Qalandia 2047 (2006) and a hundred years after the six day old war for Qalandia 2067 (2008), the last version evokes the future of Palestine on the basis of political Utopia.

Qalandia 2087 with Fish

Qalandia 2087 with Fish Detail

The question of the occupation of a given territory is no longer relevant, the main concern is now integration. The wall, which originally divided space between the check-point and the refugee camp, has been replaced by a mirror facade.

Qalandia Airport

Qalandia Airport has also retrieved its initial function as a civil airport, while the check-point has become a place reserved for public speech. Life seems to win again.

Qalandia 2087

Racing cars, airline planes, whimsically shaped TV aerials, a coffee terrace and a swimming pool transform the refugee camp into a space where communication and social links become possible again. The new party, “The Mirror,” has just won the elections and is sending each Palestinian back to their history by inviting them to take part in the construction of a better future.

Vérane Pina
Translated by Valérie Vivancos

Here and Elsewhere is on Exhibit Through September 28th, 2014, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, located at 235 Bowery (at Prince street) in Soho, NYC.

Qalandia 2087 Patio Detail

Qalandia 2087 Patio Detail

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Photos By Gail

The above pictured sculpture, Suspended Objects (2011) was created by artist Hassan Sharif from countless long strands made up of multi-colored yarns, twine, string and wire, tied together and also wrapped around bits of plastic, foam and other found objects. It’s super colorful and reminds me of a big Jellyfish.

Suspended Objects is part of the Here and Elsewhere group show now on exhibit at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, previously discussed in this post, so click that link for more information!

Suspended Objects By Hassan Sharif
Suspended Objects (Detail)

Modern Art Monday Presents: Jasper Johns, Flag

Jaser Johns Flag
Flag By Jasper Johns, 1954, Encaustic, Oil, and Collage on Fabric mounted on Plywood, Three Panels (Photo By Gail)

From Moma Dot Org:

“One night I dreamed that I painted a large American flag,” Johns has said of this work, “and the next morning I got up and I went out and bought the materials to begin it.” Those materials included three canvases that he mounted on plywood, strips of newspaper, and encaustic paint—a mixture of pigment and molten wax that has formed a surface of lumps and smears.

The newspaper scraps visible beneath the stripes and forty-eight stars lend this icon historical specificity. The American flag is something “the mind already knows,” Johns has said, but its execution complicates the representation and invites close inspection. A critic of the time encapsulated this painting’s ambivalence, asking, “Is this a flag or a painting?”

Jasper Johns was born May 15th, 1930 and currently lives in Sharon, Connecticut. Flag is part of the permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bridget Riley Blaze I

Bridget Riley Blaze 1
Bridget Riley, Blaze 1, 1962 (Photo By Gail)

While at Goldsmith’s College in London, Bridget Riley (born 1931) became interested in the optical vibrations initiated by Georges Seurat’s Pointillist technique of the 1880s. By 1961, Riley was painting solely in Black and White, and her paintings of the early 1960s are pioneering examples of what came to be known as Op Art.

With Blaze 1 (1962), Riley applied black zigzag stripes of emulsion to a white ground to create a pattern that assaults the eye: the bands of paint create a corkscrew–like optical effect wherein the two-dimensional painting appears to both recede into the wall and to project itself into space in front of the picture plane.

Bridget Riley’s Blaze 1 is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.