Tag Archive | Pink Thing of the Day

Pink Thing of The Day: Nir Hod’s Genius Nicolai (Pink)

Nir Hod Genius Nicolai Pink 2013
Photo By Gail

PK SHOP is pleased to introduce an exclusive new edition by Nir Hod. Inspired by the artist’s Genius series of paintings of precocious and portentous children, the 11 1/2 x 7 1/2 inch chrome-plated sculpture is produced in editions of seven in four bold colors: gold, pink, and two additional colors that will be announced at a later date.

A meditation on beauty and loneliness, Hod’s poised and alluring young geniuses dwell in a world of paradox, where their cherubic cheeks contrast with their scornful expressions and lit cigarettes. Philosopher Roy Brand describes them as “…little demons without disguises. But they are also yearning, beautiful, and charming, and their narcissism is more a sign of internal happiness than of vanity.”

Entitled Nicolai, the series accentuates the vulnerability of these child prodigies by pairing the knowing expressions and eerie self-possession of the painted geniuses with the sculpture’s three-dimensional diminutive body. Referencing the seductiveness of luxury materials, Hod implements chrome for the first time with this series. The shiny high-polish of the chrome is transformative; the cutting edge medium transforms the traditionally-rendered sculpture into an object of the modern world. The mirrored surface of the work appeals to the viewer’s inner narcissist, while the rich colors reflect the vivid imagery of contemporary life.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Wrist Splint

Pink Arm Splint
Photo By Jamie Moroni

I know that my friend Jamie is a great and true friend, because she always thinks of me whenever she sees anything Pink, or anything made with Bacon. This girl knows me well. Recently, Jamie’s Mom had the misfortune to break her wrist and, being the good daughter that she is, Jamie was there to deliver her to the hospital and then back home again. And of course Jamie could not resist sending me a photo of her Mom’s very fashionable Wrist Splint, which, as you can, see is a glorious Hot Pink. Heal now, Jamie’s Mom!

Pink Thing of The Day: 3D Print Pink Owl

Pink 3D Print Owl
Photo By Gail

Over the weekend, I a made pit stop into the 3D Print Show taking place in the Chelsea Gallery District and got a quick but eye-opening crash course in what this phenomenal technology is all about. It’s amazing how these objects are made! Anyway, here’s a Pink Owl I took a photo of.

3DPS

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Full Moon Coming April 4th, 2015

Pink Full Moon April 4

A friend on FaceBook sent me the above image and it looked like something I’d want to blog about. Because, Pink Moon. But it turns out that this image may be a bit misleading, as far as what the moon will actually look like on April 4th. When I hit the Google to get more information for the post, the first item that came up was from Snopes.com, the famous urban legend debunking website. Check it out.

Origins: March 2014 saw the introduction of this social media posting promoting the upcoming occurrence of a “full pink moon” on April 15th, 2014. It is true in an obscure, specific sense that April 2014 will bring us a “pink moon,” but that phenomenon is not the least bit unusual, nor will the moon literally appear to be pink (or any other non-standard color) to viewers on Earth.

As noted in the Farmer’s Almanac, some Native American tribes assigned unique names to full moons based upon the time of year in which they took place as a method of tracking the passage of seasons:

Native Americans full Moon names were created to help different tribes track the seasons. Think of it as a “nickname” for the Moon!

The early Native Americans did not record time by using the months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Many tribes kept track of time by observing the seasons and lunar months, although there was much variability. For some tribes, the year contained 4 seasons and started at a certain season, such as spring or fall. Others counted 5 seasons to a year. Some tribes defined a year as 12 Moons, while others assigned it 13. Certain tribes that used the lunar calendar added an extra Moon every few years, to keep it in sync with the seasons.

Each tribe that did name the full Moons (and/or lunar months) had its own naming preferences. Some would use 12 names for the year while others might use 5, 6, or 7; also, certain names might change the next year. A full Moon name used by one tribe might differ from one used by another tribe for the same time period, or be the same name but represent a different time period. The name itself was often a description relating to a particular activity/event that usually occurred during that time in their location.

Colonial Americans adopted some of the Native American full Moon names and applied them to their own calendar system (primarily Julian, and later, Gregorian).

As noted above, the nomenclature used for various full moons was not standardized and varied from tribe to tribe, but the Algonquin tribes (who lived in regions from New England to Lake Superior) identified a full moon occurring in April as a “Pink Moon” not because of its color, but due to its coinciding with the first appearance of the moss pink flowering plant (Phlox subulata, also known as creeping phlox, moss phlox, wild ground phlox, or mountain phlox), a harbinger of Spring:
This full Moon heralded the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox — one of the first spring flowers. It is also known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon.

Technically the term “Pink Moon” refers to the full moon that will be visible throughout most of the week of April 13-19, but the April 15 date coincides with the occurrence of a total lunar eclipse, during which the moon could take on “a dramatically colorful appearance, ranging from bright orange to blood red.” April’s “Pink Moon” is also the Paschal Full Moon that determines the date of Easter.

Thanks to Dick Christian for the Tip!

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Bambi at the Affordable Art Fair!

Pink Bambi
Photo By Gail

Hey what’s up. The annual Affordable Art Fair, which officially opens today, hosted a super crowded preview last night with free drinks and lots of amazing art that is, admittedly subjectively, priced to own. To the Fair’s creators, this means art priced up to $10,000, so your mileage may vary. I know that I admired perhaps a dozen works that I’d love to have in my collection, priced from between $400 to $3,000, so that certainly fits my budget — and that’s exciting!

This 3D Lenticular print depiction of a Hot Pink Giant Bambi wandering along a NYC street is by artist Paco Raphael, represented by the Ronen Art Gallery in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and sells for just $2700, which is a steal! There are also versions of this artwork where Bambi is Orange, and one where he is Purple. So, something for every taste!

What’s extra cool about AAF is that it hosts galleries from all over the globe, so you can see works from Europe and Asia that you otherwise might not be exposed to, all in one place.

Affordable Art Fair takes place at the Metropolitan  Pavilion, located at 125 West 18th Street in NYC, through Sunday March 29th, 2015. Visit This Link for more information!