Tag Archive | 2010

Glass Kimono

Glass Kimono
All Photos By Gail

If you live in or near Palm Springs, California, you still have just over a week to see this cast glass sculpture of a disembodied Kimono, which is called Ojigi-Bowing (2010) by artist Karen LaMonte.

Ojigi-Bowing

Check out the detail on this piece — I love it!

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Glass for the New Millennium: Masterworks from the Kaplan-Ostergaard Collection, On View Through March 7th, 2017 at the Palm Springs Art Museum.

Glass Kimono

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Remembering Peter Steele

Peter Steele White Shirt
Image Source

Type O Negative vocalist/bassist Peter Steele passed away due to heart failure on this date, April 14th, in 2010. RIP Peter.

Read my interview with Pete Steele from 2003 at This Link!

RIP Boney M Frontman Bobby Farrell


Farrell with the Lovely Ladies of Boney M

Bobby Farrell, outrageous front man for the German disco group Boney M has passed away on December 30th, 2010, following a performance in Russia. He was 61, and the cause of death is under investigation at this time. While Boney M were virtually unknown in the US, the group was absolutely huge in Europe, scoring great chart success with hits like “Ma Baker,” “Rasputin,” “Daddy Cool” and the Christmas favorite, “Mary’s Boy Child.” I was first introduced to the music of Boney M by my friend Randy, and their videos were always an in-demand and much-loved staple of his semi-annual video parties. Bobby’s dance moves were unrivaled.

Please enjoy the video for “Daddy Cool” – one of my favorite Boney M Songs – below. RIP Bobby. You were truly one of a kind.

Crazy Like a Fool

RIP Captain Beefheart

Musician and visual artist Don Van Vliet, AKA Captain Beefheart has passed away today, December 17th, 2010, in California due to complications from multiple sclerosis. He was 69 years old.

RIP Ronnie James Dio

Ronnie James Dio lost his fight with cancer on the morning of May 16th, 2010. He was 67 years old. Ronnie James popularized the heavy metal “devil horns” gesture, and for that he deserves a place among the angels. Rock on, Holy Diver.

Hamburger Time for Malcolm McLaren: 1946 – 2010

Here is a statement from Sex Pistols’ guitarist Steve Jones about Malcolm McLaren, who passed away on April 8th at age 64 from cancer.

“I was upset when I heard the news, as I’ve always had a soft spot for Malcolm.  I knew him since I was 17 before The Pistols formed — I used to drive him around in Vivienne Westwood’s car to the tailors in London in the days of the Let It Rock clothing store.  Malcolm was definitely the Brian Epstein of punk—without him it wouldn’t have happened the way it did. I stayed friends with him throughout the years despite some of our differences. He came on Jonesy’s Jukebox a couple of years ago, and that’s a good memory.  But my fondest memory of Malcolm, and I loved the guy, was his birthday gift to me when I turned 21 — he got me a hooker and some heroin.”

— Steve Jones, 4/9/2010

RIP Alex Chilton

Sad and shocking news from Commercial Appeal Dot Com:

Pop hitmaker, cult hero, and Memphis rock iconoclast Alex Chilton has died, March 17th, 2010.

The singer and guitarist, best known as a member of ’60s pop-soul act the Box Tops and the ’70s power-pop act Big Star, died today at a hospital in New Orleans. Chilton, 59, had been complaining of about his health earlier today. He was taken by paramedics to the emergency room where he was pronounced dead. The cause of death is believed to be a heart attack.

His Big Star bandmate Jody Stephens confirmed the news this evening. “Alex passed away a couple of hours ago,” Stephens said from Austin, Texas, where the band was to play Saturday at the annual South By Southwest Festival. “I don’t have a lot of particulars, but they kind of suspect that it was a heart attack.”

The Memphis-born Chilton rose to prominence at age 16, when his gruff vocals powered Box Tops massive hit “The Letter.” The band would score several more hits, including “Cry Like a Baby” and “Neon Rainbow.”

After the Box Tops ended in 1970, Chilton had a brief solo run in New York before returning to Memphis. He soon joined forces with a group of Anglo-pop-obsessed musicians, fellow songwriter/guitarist Chris Bell, bassist Andy Hummel and drummer Jody Stephens, to form Big Star.

The group became the flagship act for the local Ardent Studios’ new Stax-distributed label. Big Star’s 1972 debut album, #1 Record met with critical acclaim but poor sales. The group briefly disbanded, but reunited sans Bell to record the album Radio City. Released in 1974, the album suffered a similar fate, plagued by Stax’s distribution woes.

“I’m crushed. We’re all just crushed,” said Ardent founder John Fry, who engineered most of the Big Star sessions. “This sudden death experience is never something that you’re prepared for. And yet it occurs.”

The group made one more album, Third/Sister Lovers, with just Chilton and Stephens — and it too was a minor masterpiece. Darker and more complex than the band’s previous pop-oriented material, it remained unreleased for several years. In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine would name all three Big Star albums to its list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

In the mid-’70s Chilton began what would be a polarizing solo career, releasing several albums of material, like 1979’s Like Flies on Sherbet — a strange, chaotically recorded album of originals and obscure covers that divided fans and critics. Chilton also began performing with local roots-punk deconstructionists the Panther Burns.

In the early ’80s, Chilton left Memphis for New Orleans, where he worked a variety of jobs and stopped performing for several years. But interest in his music from a new generation of alternative bands, including R.E.M. and the Replacements, brought him back to the stage in the mid-’80s.

He continued to record and tour as a solo act throughout the decade. Finally, in the early ’90s, the underground cult based around Big Star had become so huge that the group was enticed to reunite with a reconfigured lineup.

“It’s obvious to anybody that listens to his live performances or his body of recorded work, his tremendous talent as a vocalist and songwriter and instrumentalist,” Fry said.

“Beyond the musical talent, he was an interesting, articulate and extremely intelligent person,” Fry added. “I don’t think you’d ever have a conversation with him of any length that you didn’t learn something completely new.”

The band, featuring original member Stephens plus Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow of the Posies, continued to perform regularly over the next 16 years. Big Star became the subject of various articles, books and CD reissue campaigns, including the release of widely hailed box set, Keep an Eye on the Sky, released last year by Rhino Records.

“When some people pass, you say it was the end of an era. In this case, it’s really true,” said Memphis singer-songwriter Van Duren, a Chilton contemporary in the Memphis rock scene of the ’70s.

The band was scheduled to launch the spring 2010 season at the Levitt Shell at Overton Park with a benefit concert on May 15.

Big Star had not played in Memphis since a 2003 Beale Street Music Festival appearance.

Chilton is survived by his wife, Laura, and a son Timothy.