Tag Archives: easter

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Lady

pink lady photo by gail worley
Stylin’! (Photo By Gail)

On Easter Sunday, the place to be was Tompkins Square Park, where friendly and festive  East Village neighbors dressed in their most colorful finery for some kind of Easter Bonnet Festival — which may or may not be a returning annual tradition. There were dozens of great looks, but this lovely Lady in Pink was my favorite for obvious reasons.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Marshmallow Macarons from Dana’s Bakery!

Pink Marshmallow Macaron by Danas Bakery

I first discovered Dana’s Bakery and their fancy and fabulous Macarons at a Summer Fancy Food Show a few summers back. When it comes to imaginative baking and creative flavor profiles, nobody does it like Dana’s. Just in time for our first Easter spent in nationwide quarantine, Dana’s Bakery has announced their special Pink Marshmallow Macaron! Each box includes 12 bright pink macarons with sweet marshmallow creme filling, rolled in sugar sprinkles! Always gluten-free and kosher, available for April in their Build-A-Box and Variety Pack. Visit This Link order!

Stations of The Cross: Station 13 at Trinity Church

Station of The Cross #13
Photo By Gail

Stations of the Cross is a public art project, weaving through 14 religious and secular art spaces from The Cloisters museum to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to Trinity Church and the 9/11 Memorial. The series breaks open the journey of Jesus, inviting people of all faiths to consider injustice across the human experience with a focus on the plight of immigrants and refugees. Station 13, Jesus is Taken Down From the Cross, is realized in Stations, 2016-18 by G. Roland Biermann, which can be found at the side courtyard between Trinity Church and Cemetery at Broadway and Wall Street in the financial district.

Station of The Cross #13

Sleek minimalism and gritty reality are seen in Biermann’s sculpture, in which two guardrails slice through the air, forming a fallen cross. Jesus‘ deposition finds a contemporary echo in the everyday tragedy of a car crash. Oil barrels suggest automobiles, but we might also think of olive oil, used in the Bible to anoint priests and cure the sick. Painted 14 shades of red — suggesting blood that runs, congeals, and quickens anew — the barrels evoke the Stations of The Cross as a whole. There might be consolation in the symbolism of Holy Blood and Holy Oil. Alternatively, we might think about the blood spilt in the pursuit of fossil fuels: our eagerness to import barrels of crude from the Middle East but unwillingness to accept refugees from that region. This sculpture is equal parts sacred and profane, ancient and contemporary.

Stations of the Cross Runs through Easter Sunday, April 1st, 2018. Visit a map of all fourteen installations, and plan your own journey at This Link.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Easter Peeps!

Pink Easter Bunny Peeps
Photo By Gail

Have a Peep-like Easter, Everybody!

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Full Moon Coming April 4th, 2015

Pink Full Moon April 4

A friend on FaceBook sent me the above image and it looked like something I’d want to blog about. Because, Pink Moon. But it turns out that this image may be a bit misleading, as far as what the moon will actually look like on April 4th. When I hit the Google to get more information for the post, the first item that came up was from Snopes, the famous urban legend debunking website. Check it out.

Origins: March 2014 saw the introduction of this social media posting promoting the upcoming occurrence of a “full pink moon” on April 15th, 2014. It is true in an obscure, specific sense that April 2014 will bring us a “pink moon,” but that phenomenon is not the least bit unusual, nor will the moon literally appear to be pink (or any other non-standard color) to viewers on Earth.

As noted in the Farmer’s Almanac, some Native American tribes assigned unique names to full moons based upon the time of year in which they took place as a method of tracking the passage of seasons:

Native Americans full Moon names were created to help different tribes track the seasons. Think of it as a “nickname” for the Moon!

The early Native Americans did not record time by using the months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Many tribes kept track of time by observing the seasons and lunar months, although there was much variability. For some tribes, the year contained 4 seasons and started at a certain season, such as spring or fall. Others counted 5 seasons to a year. Some tribes defined a year as 12 Moons, while others assigned it 13. Certain tribes that used the lunar calendar added an extra Moon every few years, to keep it in sync with the seasons.

Each tribe that did name the full Moons (and/or lunar months) had its own naming preferences. Some would use 12 names for the year while others might use 5, 6, or 7; also, certain names might change the next year. A full Moon name used by one tribe might differ from one used by another tribe for the same time period, or be the same name but represent a different time period. The name itself was often a description relating to a particular activity/event that usually occurred during that time in their location.

Colonial Americans adopted some of the Native American full Moon names and applied them to their own calendar system (primarily Julian, and later, Gregorian).

As noted above, the nomenclature used for various full moons was not standardized and varied from tribe to tribe, but the Algonquin tribes (who lived in regions from New England to Lake Superior) identified a full moon occurring in April as a “Pink Moon” not because of its color, but due to its coinciding with the first appearance of the moss pink flowering plant (Phlox subulata, also known as creeping phlox, moss phlox, wild ground phlox, or mountain phlox), a harbinger of Spring:
This full Moon heralded the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox — one of the first spring flowers. It is also known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon.

Technically the term “Pink Moon” refers to the full moon that will be visible throughout most of the week of April 13-19, but the April 15 date coincides with the occurrence of a total lunar eclipse, during which the moon could take on “a dramatically colorful appearance, ranging from bright orange to blood red.” April’s “Pink Moon” is also the Paschal Full Moon that determines the date of Easter.

Thanks to Dick Christian for the Tip!

Pope Peep

Pope Peep
Image Source

This Kills Me.

Our Father Darth Vader Print and Prayer Candles Set By Sket One

Sket One Our Father Vader Print
Image Source

On Friday, April 18th at 12 Noon EDT, this amazing color print of Darth Vader as Jesus by the LA-based artist Sket One goes on sale at 1xRun Dot Com. Purchase of the limited edition print (25 copies only) includes a set of matching Darth Vader Prayer Candles: one Red and one Blue (pictured below). The print set with candles will sell for only $85 (unbelievable!).

Sket One Our Father Vader Red Candle

The print is limited to an edition of just 25 posters.

The Prayer Candles (limited to an edition of 150 of each color) can also be purchased separately for $25 each. Seriously, it’s almost not worth it not to buy the entire set. Please note that the Our Father print comes unframed but framing is available for an additional fee. Read more about this run, including an interview with artist at This Link.

Sket One Our Father Vader Blue Candle