Tag Archive | Paul Kasmin Gallery

Eye On Design: Crocodile Banquette By Claude LaLanne

Crocodile Banquette Front View
All Photos By Gail

Claude Lalanne (born 1924) is a French designer known for her eccentric works, which are often animal themed. She also worked with her late husband, Francois-Xavier Lalannne (19272008), under the name Les Lalannes.

Crocodile Banquette

Claude Lalanne’s gilt-bronze Banquette Crocodile is one of the designer’s most sought-after pieces, the realism of its reptiles coming as a result of a trip to the Paris zoo in 1972. It seems the designer had envisioned the creation of such a piece for quite some time but was in need of an actual crocodile upon which to base it.

Crocodile Banquette Rear View
Banquette, Rear View

As the story goes, Lalanne decided to put in a request to the city’s zookeepers for the remains of a crocodile, should one happen to expire of old age when nature took its course. And so a crocodile did pass away and, shortly thereafter, Lalanne went to collect her specimen in the company of fellow artist Niki de Saint Phalle.

Crocodile Banquette Installation View
Installation view with Claude LaLanne-designed Mirror and Candle Holders

Since then, the highly textured crocodile motif has taken shape in a number of her works, ranging from chandeliers to tables and chairs as well as the bench, which was designed in 2006, and cast in 2007 in an edition of eight with four artist’s proofs.  Most of these pieces have been sold at auction at Christie’s and Sotheby’s for anywhere from $500,000 to $1 Million each.

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 509 West 27th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, NYC, Where You Can See This Bench and Other Works By Les Lalannes on Exhibit Through March 9th, 2019.

Mark Ryden Presents Whipped Cream at the Paul Kasmin Gallery

Dessert Counter
Dessert Counter By Mark Ryden (All Photos By Gail)

Good timing: it is a thing. Because we neglected to pay close attention to the unorthodox start time of the recent opening reception for Mark Ryden’s The Art of Whipped Cream exhibit at the Paul Kasmin Gallery, we arrived four minutes before they locked the doors behind us, and had to do a mad dash through the gallery to snap some photos for this post before they gave us the bums rush.

Mark Ryden Fans
Marky Ryden Fans Are Much Cooler Than You Are

The upside to our extreme tardiness is that gallery was nearly empty, and we were able to secure many decent, people-free photos! Winning!

Whipped Cream Installation View
Installation View

The Art of Whipped Cream features drawings, sketches and paintings created for the production of American Ballet Theatre’s Whipped Cream. A concurrent exhibition of Ryden’s work for the ballet is running at Gallery Met, located at the Metropolitan Opera House, through July 8th, 2017.

Please enjoy our photos from the show!

Cotton Candy Curtain
Cotton Candy Curtain

Whipped Cream Drop
Whipped Cream Drop

Princess Praline and Her Entourage
Princess Praline and Her Entourage

Princess Praline Detail
Princess Praline, Detail

Parfait Man
Parfait Man

The Carriage
The Carriage

Nicolo
Nicolo

Sketches
Sketches

Church Tree Scrim
Church Tree Scrim

Installation View
Installation View

Plum Brandy
Marianne
Boris

Mark Ryden: The Art of Whipped Cream will be on view through July 21st, 2017 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 515 West 27th Street,in the Chelsea Gallery District.

American Ballet Theatre’s Whipped Cream will be Performed at the Metropolitan Opera House, NYC, Through July 8th, 2017. Buy Tickets at This Link.

The Hospital
The Hospital

Nurse Corps de Ballet
Nurse Corps de Ballet

Dessert Counter Detail
Dessert Counter, Detail

Roxy Paine’s Farewell Transmission at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Meeting
Meeting, 2016, Scale Diorama By Roxy Paine (All Photos By Gail)

Paul Kasmin Gallery is currently hosting Farewell Transmission, a two-venue exhibition of recent sculpture by Roxy Paine, for the artist’s first major New York solo exhibition in three years and the first of his sculpture with Paul Kasmin.

Over the past 25 years, Paine’s sculptures ruminate upon the clash of the human and the natural worlds, and the warring of chaos and control that result from humanity’s attempts to manage the process.  Farewell Transmission presents two distinct series, Dioramas and Dendroids; each express the artist’s anxieties about the human impact on our habitat and the mechanized tools that seek to impose order and control, often to disordered and unpredictable ends.

In his Dioramas, Paine adopts and adapts a format familiar within the natural history museum, but instead of employing human artifice to represent the natural world, Paine’s Dioramas use organic materials to represent quotidian environments where the fundamental states of the Homo Sapien can be observed. Rooted in the Greek language, diorama translates to “through that which is seen.” Paine’s Dioramas are a device through which one can examine our own habitat, culture and society.  Seemingly innocuous at first, each Diorama presents a room devoid of actual figures, yet charged with their psychological dilemmas.

Meeting Detail

Meeting (2016) is the artist’s most intimate in scale from the series, and implies through attentive details such as a ring of non-descript office chairs, the community space that hosts one of the variety twelve-step substance abuse programs.

Meeting Coffee

Experiment
Experiment, Installation View

Experiment (2015) the only diorama of an actual historical event, though one for which we have no photographs, depicts the setting of a 1950s-70s CIA surveillance program examining the effects of LSD.

Experiment Detail

Looking at this hallucinatory experience through another surveilling environment heightens the paranoid feelings of control, manipulation and misguided forensic observation. Personal associations and past encounters with these familiar spaces inevitably creep into the imagined scenes of the Diorama, collapsing the distance between the viewer and that which is on view.

Experiment Detail

Desolation Row

In Desolation Row (2017) a remarkable new work, Paine synthesizes the tree silhouettes of the Dendroids, the simulation of the Dioramas and the expansiveness of his earlier Fields series to replicate nature in solitude and at its most poignant moment.

Desolation Row

Returning to the motif of the tree, Paine presents them in Desolation Row as charred, barren, and destroyed. Positioned across a 13-ft table, Desolation Row is an unflinching portrayal of the infinite cycle of control and chaos reaching its devastating yet paradoxical conclusion where Paine leaves the question of renewal to be resolved.

Dendroids Installation View

Fusing organic forms, such as trees, flowers, and fungi with man-made structures and materials among which include stainless steel, epoxy, and polymer, Paine invents, distorts, surprises and confounds our perception of the natural and inorganic and the real and artificial.

Dendroids

The new Dendroids, Paine’s first iteration in over 5 years of his iconic stainless steel sculptures, further expand upon this multifaceted, yet imperfect, transformation of the industrial into the natural, with even more daring grafting, beguiling engineering, and wild experimentation.

Organ Tree

In the new works, tree trunks, branches and roots intertwine with lungs and hearts, or with electricity poles and debris and detritus.

Utility Pole Treet

Ground Fault (2016) poetically melds a tree’s roots and trunk with two transformers that are used to circulate electromagnetic energy.  Paine’s Dendroids continue to reveal the intrinsic affinities and twisted connectivity of a tree’s form with other plant, human and man-made systems.

Dendrils Triptych

Roxy Paine: Farewell Transmission, will be on Exhibit Through July 1st, 2011 at Paul Kasmin Gallery’s Locations at293 and 297 Tenth Avenue, at 27th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Roxy Paine Signage

Dendrils

 

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Eye On Design: Mattia Bonetti’s Liquid Gold Cabinet

Liquid Gold CabinetLiquid Gold Cabinet
All Photos By Gail

The Swiss-born designer Matia Bonetti is known for his irreverent, eye-grabbing, and (often) dazzlingly shiny functional objects. Bonetti enjoys playing with both organic and geometric forms rather than adhering to a consistent style. Created from Gold-plated bronze, cast aluminum, and rock crystal, the Liquid Gold Cabinet combines the two aesthetics, the designer offers, “because it’s quite straight in line, but you have all these ripplings that are more informal. They could be called Baroque, with their guiding and the richness.”

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery, NYC as part of the Indoor Outdoor Exhibit in 2013.

Liquid Gold Cabinet
Liquid Gold Cabinet Shown Here with the Arctic Raft Side Table to the Left

Eye On Design: Mattia Bonetti, Lucky Side Table or Stool

Lucky Side Table or Stool
(“Get Lucky” (All Photos By Gail)

Swiss designer Mattia Bonetti scores again with Lucky (2013), a stainless steel Di (get a second to make proper pair of dice) which measures 18.62″ H x 18.6″ W x 18.62″ D and can be used as a stool or side table. Available in an edition of 100.

Lucky Side Table or Stool

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery in NYC.

Eye on Design: Mattia Bonetti’s Archetype Table Lamp

Archtype Table Lamp
All Photos By Gail

Isn’t this piece fabulous? Swiss designer Mattia Bonetti  created his Archetype Lamp (2013) to mimic a Head and Shoulders silhouette, and what a head turner it is.  Fabricated in bronze and Murano glass in a limited edition of 8, plus 2 artist proofs.

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery in NYC.

Poppy Side Chair Scuba Console Table
Archetype Lamp Shown Here atop the Scuba Console Table, with the Poppy Side Chair

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Yes, It Exists: Cabbage Sculpture With Chicken Feet

Cabbage with Chicken Feet
All Photos By Gail

Parisian born sculptress Claude Lalanne (b. 1924) did not come into her own until she was in her sixties. She and her husband, François-Xavier Lalanne (1927-2008), were known as Les Lalannes as they both worked and exhibited together, she creating garden-inspired works to his slightly surreal animal sculptures.

This provocative cast bronze sculpture of a Cabbage with Chicken Feet, entitled Choupatte Moyen (2012) is part of the Impasse Ronsin group exhibit at Paul Kasmin Gallery on West 27th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Choupatte Moyen

Ian Davenport, Doubletake at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Ian Davenport Installation View 2
All Photos By Gail

Paul Kasmin Gallery is currently hosting Doubletake, an exhibition of new paintings by the British artist Ian Davenport. This is Davenport’s first solo show at the gallery since 2013’s Colorfall.

Primavesi Magenta Purple
Primavesi Magenta Purple

In Doubletake, Davenport explores the chromatic essence of historical masterpieces, the palette of many of the paintings being inspired by a canonical work. He has ranged widely through history for his sources, paying homage to paintings spanning from the 16th century to the 20th, creating a remarkable record of a painter’s taste and powerfully demonstrating how a great tradition of historical pictures can inform contemporary art.

Doubletake

His technique, driven by an enduring fascination with the materiality of paint and the process of painting, is similar in each. First, after studying the painting in depth and gaining an intuitive understanding of its colors and hues, he goes to work using his signature technique, which delivers elegant vertical lines cascading down the panels into rich puddles of color.

Doubletake

Their effect is both sublime, in their evocation of waterfalls, and subliminal, in their reminders of history. Referenced paintings include Van Gogh’s The Church in Auvers-sur-Oise, View from the Chevet, (1890) pulling out the rich blues of the sky, the green and beige from the lawn and path, and the reds from the roof of the church.

Splat Paintings

Other works that have inspired him include Jan Brueghel the Elder’s Flowers In A Wooden Vessel, (1606), Mada Primavesi (1912) by Gustav Klimt, and The Marriage of the Virgin (1504) by the Italian Renaissance master Perugino.

Cadmium Yellow
Cadmium Yellow

Each time, Davenport uses the colors in the historical work as a reference point to initiate his own color sequences and explorations of movement, surface and light. In so doing, he questions how color gives shape to a picture, helping to structure the background and foreground in representational pictures, and produce rhythm and dynamism in abstract art.

Ian Davenport’s Doubletake will be on Exhibit Through October 22nd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 293 Tenth Avenue (SW Corner of 27th Street) in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Ian Davenport Signage

Ian Davenport Installation View 1

Deborah Kass, No Kidding at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Good Times Installation View
All Photos By Gail

Paul Kasmin Gallery is currently hosting Deborah Kass: No Kidding, an exhibition of new mixed media paintings. Mounted on fields of primarily black and blue, Kass incorporates neon lights in her paintings for the first time, limiting her signature palette, to spell out puns and phrases bearing pop cultural references that provide a somber meditation on the troubling present, and uncertain future.

Black and Blue
Black and Blue

Blue #2
Blue #2

Well Be Young Forever
Well Be Young Forever

No Kidding represents the artist’s fourth body of work that deals at the intersection of popular culture, contemporary art, art history, and politics. Like all of Kass’s most important series of the past 25 years, these works might be said to deploy what has been recently labeled citational modernism. But in stark contrast to its current practitioners, her work has consistently and articulately deconstructed the unspoken politics of modernism and reinvented it with urgent and contemporary political meaning. An extension of her feel good paintings for feel bad times, Kass’ most recent body of work sets a darker, tougher tone as she reflects on contemporary issues such as global warming, institutional racism, police brutality, gun violence, and attacks on women’s health, through the lens of minimalism and grief.

Just a Shot Away
Just a Shot Away

Kass’ paintings often borrow their titles and puns from songs, such as, Just A Shot Away, 2014, which takes its name from the Rolling Stones’ 1969 song  “Gimme Shelter,” that was written in response to the violence of that time. Consistently laden with ambiguity, this work, along with others in the series, references a range of current social, political, and environmental tipping points.

Installation View

Happy Days, 2014, a multi panel, black-colored painting, references the campaign song for Franklin D. Roosevelt’s successful 1932 Presidential campaign. The song was re-recorded thirty years later by Barbra Streisand – historically one of Kass’ muses– giving it a new context for a different generation. Kass provides yet another reading, commenting on the fate of the New Deal and America’s relationship to happiness and hope. As the viewer sees their reflection in the mirror-like surface, they are reminded of their responsibility for the present state of affairs.

The Band Played On
The Band Played On

In a separate room, Kass’ paintings The Band Played On and Prepare for Saints provide the coda for the show. In the spirit of Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, they are made with non-traditional materials, and collectively with all the paintings in the exhibit, look at the present and the future with striking ambivalence.

Prepare for Saints #2
Prepare for Saints #2

Good Times
Good Times

No Kidding By Deborah Kass will be on Exhibit Through January 23rd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 515 West 27th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

D Kass Signage

Erik Parker, Undertow, at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Installation View
All Photos By Gail

When everyone else was waiting on line to get into the Mark Ryden exhibit across the street, I was in the newest addition to the Paul Kasmin Gallery empire taking photos of Eric Parker’s latest show (and third solo-exhibition with the gallery), which had opened the previous night. Because timing is everything.

Talking Point
Talking Point, 2015

Talking Point Detail
Talking Point, Detail (Above and Below)

Talking Point Detail

Erik Parker’s Undertow is an exhibition of new paintings which represent a confluence of ideas and styles explored in previous bodies of work including the Maps, Heads, Landscapes and Hieroglyphics. Parker’s iconic, highly-saturated palette and intricate compositions are amplified by collage and airbrush techniques that create a balance of density and open space.

Taste Maker
Taste Maker, 2015

Undertow offers insight into the evolution of Parker’s work over the last two decades. Here, the artist continues to critically chart the world’s current political, social, and economic landscapes with compositions brimming with references to media, popular culture, music, and art history. Synthesizing multiple elements from his myriad styles into new dynamic compositions, the artist works at breaking down the metanarratives of late modernist painting while simultaneously digesting the pictorial chatter of scrolling feeds of social media.

Offshore
Offshore, 2015

Highlighted in the exhibition are Parker’s new shaped canvases with which he develops the narrative possibilities of form. In Offshore the support structure of the canvas takes the shape of binocular lenses, framing the action as if seen from afar.

Offshore Detail
Offshore, Detail

Disconnected
Disconnected, 2015

Parker’s large-scale, two-part shaped canvas titled Disconnected, features a Pyramid representing the global elite. The pyramid is physically separated from the second canvas – literally leaving the rest of the picture, or perhaps, society behind.

Front Runner
Front Runner, 2015

Erik Parker’s Undertow will be on Exhibit Through January 23rd, 2016 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 297 Tenth Avenue in the Chelsea Gallery. District.

Undertow Signage