Tag Archive | Will Ryman

Will Ryman, Two Rooms at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Will Ryman Situation Room
The Situation Room (All Photos By Gail)

What we like best about artist Will Ryman is the fact that all of his projects look completely different to each other. Whether it is sculptures of Giant Roses, a big Bird made of nails, or a Golden scale replica of the Log Cabin where Abraham Lincoln was born, it is always fun to see what he is going to do next.

Right now, Paul Kasmin Gallery’s West 27th Street space is hosting Two Rooms, a solo exhibition featuring two of Ryman’s new sculptural installations.  The Situation Room (2012–2014) is a life-size installation based on the iconic photograph that captured members of the Obama administration and U.S. military leaders watching in real time the Navy SEAL raid on Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan in 2011. Among those gathered in the White House Situation Room were President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Developed over the course of three years, the sculpture is composed of crushed black coal as a reference to industrial development and as a means to redact the specificity of the photograph, reducing the tableau to its elemental components. The Situation Room is a contemplation on war, power, propaganda, industrialization, and political theater. In its reductive monumentality, Ryman’s appropriation of the photograph becomes an anonymous fossilization of the timelessness of war.

Will Ryman Classroom

Classroom presents 12 figures from the same cast, each made of a different natural resource or composite essential to various cultures and economies including cadmium, titanium, salt, iron, oil, chrome, copper, wood, and gold.

Wax Student

Arranged in four rows of three, the figures evoke traditional classroom settings, interchangeable workers in a factory’s assembly line, or soldiers in military formation.

Iron and Gold Student

Their youthful appearance references the practice of child labor so widespread in many countries. Corporations in developed countries often refer to their employees as their greatest “natural resource,” and in one interpretation of the installation, Ryman extends the metaphor to an inexorable conclusion: workers are a material to be mined and exploited in the service of industry. They are, to the extent possible, mechanized.

Red and Silver Student

Will Ryman’s Two Rooms will be on Exhibit Through Oct 17th, 2015 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 515 West 27th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Copper Student

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Bloodflames Revisited at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Roxy Paine Incident/Resurrection, 2013
Roxy Paine, Incident/Resurrection, 2013 (This Image Courtesy Paul Kasmin Gallery. All Other Photos By Gail)

Paul Kasmin Gallery, in collaboration with Rail Curatorial Projects, is currently hosting the exhibit Bloodflames Revisited, curated by Phong Bui. For this exhibit, in which bright red is a predominant thematic color, a red wooden catwalk has been constructed inside the gallery for visitors to walk on, and the floor has been covered with straw. Very interesting!

Red Catwalk and Straw

Bloodflames Revisited includes works by Worley Gig favorites like Lynda Benglis, Will Ryman, Roxy Paine and Cindy Sherman plus John Bock, Lee Bul, Cameron Gainer, Candida Höfer, Bill Jensen, Michael Joo, Deborah Kass, Alex Katz, Benjamin Keating, Glenn Ligon, Chris Martin, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Donald Moffett, G.T. Pellizzi, Joanna Pousette-Dart, Dorothea Rockburne, Do Ho Suh, Superflex, Tunga, Not Vital and Joe Zucker.

“We were all interested in building a field of vision in which the relationship between the works of art and the spectators is intergrated with greater amplification,” explains Bui.

Will Ryman Rose
Rose I By Will Ryman

In this exhibit, Bui and the participant artists pay homage to the seminal March 1947 Bloodflames exhibition at Hugo Gallery, which Alexander Iolas directed before opening his eponymous gallery. Organized by Nicolas Calas and designed by Frederick Kiesler, Bloodflames presented works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Isamu Noguchi and Jean-Claude Reynal among others.

Kiesler’s design called for an unconventional exhibition construction, wherein artworks were projected and tilted at various angles from the gallery walls, to allow uncommon perspectives of view. His bold architectural interventions dissolved the barrier between viewer and artwork. By recontextualizing this groundbreaking exhibition, Bloodflames Revisited evokes the inventive spirit and unified spatial experience of the original exhibition.

Redemption of the Flesh
Daniel Joseph Martinez, Redemption of the Flesh: It’s just a little headache, it’s just a little bruise; The politics of the future as urgent as the blue sky, 2008 (Computer-controlled animatronic cloned sculptural installation, fiber-glass and animal hair over aluminum, and synthetic “blood”).

The imposing Daniel Joseph Martinez piece above takes over the entire rear wall of the front gallery. I am sure it looks quite different at this juncture than it does in this pic from the opening reception.

Here are few of our favorite pieces from the show.

Michael Joo, Intuited Composition, 2008
Michael Joo, Intuited Composition

Specimen Series: Stove
Do-Ho Suh, Specimen Series: Stove

Alice Cooper

Look, it’s Alice Cooper!

IMG_2442

Bloodflames Revisted will be on Exhibit Through August 15th, 2014 at at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 293 Tenth Avenue at 27th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Bloodflames Exhibit Signage

Will Ryman’s Bird at the Flatiron Plaza

Will Ryman Bird 1
Photos By Gail

Bird (2012), is a 12-foot high, 12-foot wide, and 14-foot long sculpture, made with fifty-five hundred actual and fabricated nails in the shape of a bird. The work weighs five tons, and rests upon a nest of ninety thousand nails. Through this sculpture, Ryman changes the meaning of the nail, which is traditionally used to connect materials and build structures. By dramatically altering its scale and using it in excessive quantities, Ryman blurs the relationship between abstraction and realism. As the viewer rotates around the sculpture, Bird transitions from the shape of a bird to a nonrepresentational sculpture.

Bird will be on Display through April 21st, 2013
Flatiron Plaza  Intersection of 23rd Street, 5th Avenue and Broadway,  New York

Will Ryman Bird 2

Will Wyman Bird Rear View

Will Ryman’s America at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Will Ryman America Exterior Front
This is America (All Photos By Gail)

Artist Will Ryman built a Log Cabin, painted it metallic Gold inside and out, bedazzled its interior walls with collages of gold painted car parts, railroad parts, cotton, computer parts, corn, coal, bullets, arrowheads, chains and shackles, and named the finished piece America. Today, March 30th, is the final day that you can see America on exhibit at the Paul Kasmin Gallery. Here are some photos of or what you are going to miss if you can’t make it over there by 6:00 PM.

Will Ryman America Edge Detail
Cabin Edge Details

Will Ryman America Interior from Window
View into Cabin from Exterior

Will Ryman America Interior Detail
Interior Wall Detail. The round objects on the bottom row are car gas tank caps.

Will Ryman America Interior Detail 2
Alternate Interior Wall Detail. As you can see, it is very shiny, and reminded me of walking into a Pirate’s Treasure Chest.

Will Ryman America Interior Fire Place
Fireplace

Will Ryman American Rear View
Rear View of Cabin

Paul Kasmin Gallery is Located at 515 W. 27th Street, New York, NY 10001, Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10: 00 AM – 6:00 PM.

Art on Art at Adam Baumgold Gallery

Suicide By Modernism By Mark Kostabi (2005/2011) Photo By Geoffrey Dicker

The Adam Baumgold Gallery on New York’s Upper East Side is currently hosting a group show called Art on Art, in which each artist references other artists or artworks in his or her own creation. This makes for a diverse collection full of humorous touches that inspired a lot of lively conversation at last night’s opening. My favorite painting in the exhibit is Mark Kostabi’s Suicide by Modernism, which has the artist’s unmistakable imprint while managing to reference nearly a dozen of his famous peers. Suicide By Modernism very cleverly depicts one of Kostabi’s iconic figures hanging limp from the arm of an Alexander Calder mobile, from which highly recognizable works by Piet Mondrian, Takashi Murakami, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Mark Rothko and Yves Klein also dangle. Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel sculpture appears, overturned, in the painting’s foreground. Mark Kostabi was at the opening party and he seems like a really cool guy. It was nice to be able to shake his hand and tell him how much I loved this painting in particular, and his work in general. Mark Kostabi!

You can read the exhibit press release and see a preview of many of the included paintings, drawings and sculptures online at Adam Baumgold Gallery Dot Com. I’d recommend making the trip uptown, however, to see the works in person, and make sure you take a walk up or down Park Avenue while you’re in the neighborhood to see Will Ryman’s “Roses” sculpture installation (57th to 67 Streets on the Avenue’s central traffic island), which are just amazing, and on display only until May 31st.

Art on Art runs through June 25, 2011, at Adam Baumgold, located at 60 East 66th Street (Between Park and Madison Avenues) in NYC. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 11:00 AM to 5:30 PM. For additional information, please contact Adam Baumgold at (212) 861-7338, or email abaumgold@aol.com.