Tag Archives: art glass

In Celebration of 4/20: Ten Rad Art Bongs!

trapped by coyle photo by gail worley
Trapped By Coyle (All Photos By Gail)

In January of 2015, I was invited to an art show  billed as an exhibit of “Functional Art Glass.” It turned out to be a show of amazing glass bongs, water pipes and other smoking paraphernalia,  hosted by the online headshop  1 Percent. Tommy Chong was even there! While digging around for a pot-related image in my photo archives, because 4/20, I uncovered my stash of pix from that evening, so I am dusting them off here where you can enjoy them  again, or for the first time,  depending on how long you have been reading this blog.

high class bong photo by gail worley

Do you like to think about milking cows while you get high? If so, then you might like High Class, a collaboration from glassblowers MTP and Jake Vincent.

Post Continues After The Jump!

Continue reading In Celebration of 4/20: Ten Rad Art Bongs!

Modern Art Monday Presents: Peacock Vase By Louis C. Tiffany

peacock vase by tiffany photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This glass Peacock Vase (189396), with its evocative form, coloring and iridescent surface, is an icon of the early Tiffany-blown Favrile glass collected by H.O. (Henry) Havemayer. He gave it to The Met in 1896 during the first years of its production; at the time it was considered modern art and an object of rare beauty. These qualities are reflected in the collecting visions presented in the gallery in which this vase is displayed, which features transformative gifts from the Havemeyers through the Annenbergs.

peacock vase by tiffany photo by gail worley

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Making The Met at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Steuben Glass Vase By Frederick Carder

steuben glass vase photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This striking, six-pronged Green Glass Vase (circa 1931) is part of a small group of modernist art glass by Frederick Carder for the Steuben Division of Corning Glass Works. Carder was a glass blower, born and trained in England. He preferred traditional forms and elaborate ornament, but like many of his contemporaries active in the late 1920s, he responded to the international interest in abstraction and avant-garde experimentation by incorporating sharp angles, asymmetry, and bright color combinations into some of his designs.

steuben glass vase photo by gail worley
Installation View

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

Pink Thing Of The Day: Dance of The Pacific Coast Highway at Sunset By Amber Cowan

Pink Thing Of The Day
All Photos By Gail

Amber Cowan is a sculptress who works exclusively with recycled vintage glass, and her art is just phenomenal for its intricate beauty and imaginative qualities, combined with an irresistible nostalgic pull. The above tableau is entitled Dance of The Pacific Coast Highway at Sunset (2019) — was part of an exhibit of her work at NYC’s Heller Gallery, which just closed this past weekend.

Pink Glass Sculpture Detail

Amber’s work asks universal questions about rebirth, knowledge, desire and the transformative powers of labor and imagination. Her fantastical grotto-like assemblages are made of re-worked pressed glassware, once produced by some of the best known, but now-defunct, American glass factories.  In her most recent, narrative wall sculptures, she creates intricate and exuberant settings for character-objects, which she has collected over years.  Unabashedly showing her emotional investment in these objects, the artist pays spontaneous and spectacular homage to the history of US glass manufacturing.

Edge Detail

She is currently working with a process which involves flameworking, blowing, and hot-sculpting recycled, up-cycled, and second-life glass that is usually American pressed glass from the 1940’s to the 1980’s. The glass used is generally sought through thrift stores, flea markets and post-production factory runs, the places where it is has been abandoned to the dust bins of American design.

Dance of the Pacific Coast Highway

Eye On Design: Morning Glory Wall Sconce Sculpture By Providence Art Glass

Morning Glory Wall Sconce
All Photos By Gail

Brand new at this spring’s Architectural Digest Design Show is a fabulous piece of lighting from the folks at Providence Art Glass that’s so new, it’s not even on the company’s website yet. The Morning Glory light fixture can be described as a six-foot vining wall sconce/sculpture comprised of twelve glass buds in an opalescent, pale blue hue, all hand-fabricated with brass and copper with a green patina. To create the buds, according to artist Rebecca Zhukov (who owns Providence Art Glass with partner Terence Dubreuil) each blue globe is blown into a copper floral frame, where the two materials meld together.

Morning Glory Wall Sconce Detail
Morning Glory Wall Sconce, Detail

The Morning Glory Wall Sconce can be created to-order in any size, with any number of glass shades. The price for the Morning Glory shown here is $14,000, but with prices starting at just $1,000 for one globe with eighteen inches of vine, you can afford to customize this beautiful bespoke art glass for your own home!

Morning Glory Wall Sconce Installation View
Providence Art Glass Booth, Installation View

Check out other unique glass lighting and furniture works from Providence Art Glass online at This Link!

Morning Glory Wall Sconce

Pink Thing of The Day: Dale Chihuly’s Rose Crystal Tower in Union Square

Rose Crystal Tower Daytime Uptown View
All Photos By Gail

I first noticed the Rose Crystal Tower, a new public art installation from globally famous glass artist Dale Chihuly, as I rode past it while I was on the 14th Street bus. The eye-catching pink sculpture was unveiled on October 6th, 2017 and will stay up for one full year, as part of the NYC Parks’ program Art in the Parks (which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year). Art in the Parks is responsible for many notable works of art in public green spaces around the city, including the OY/YO installation in Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Rose Crystal Tower Daytime

Rose Crystal Tower Daytime Park View

While it maintains a semi-translucent quality, the Rose Crystal Tower is not actually made of glass, but rather  is composed of Polyvitro crystals and steel. According to an announcement from the Parks Department, Polyvitro is “the artist’s term for a plastic material which he casts into individual chunks which resemble glass, but are lighter and more resilient.” There is a similar sculpture at the Chihuly Garden and Glass museum in Seattle, and you can see a bit of that piece in this photo, which I took when I was there several years ago.

Rose Crystal Tower Daytime Park View

I have walked by the Rose Crystal Tower a few times and have taken photos of it from many different angles and in different lighting. It is always gorgeous.

Rose Crystal Tower Daytime Park View

Check out the difference in the way the individual crystal groupings look in the daytime, as compared with how it looks at night, in the shots above and below.

Rose Crystal Tower at Night Detail 2
Detail of the Sculpture at Night

Here are more nighttime shots, where you can really apreciate the interior illumination.

Rose Crystal Tower at Night

Rose Crystal Tower at Night

Chihuly’s Rose Crystal Tower is located on the east side of Union Square Park, on the traffic triangle at 15th Street and Park Avenue South. The work will be on display through October 2018, so you have lots of time to see it.

Rose Crystal Tower at Night

Rose Crystal Tower in Spring

Here’s the Tower on a beautiful spring day (April 29th, 2018) with the cherry blossoms in the background!

Larry Bell’s Pacific Red II at the Whitney Museum

Pacific Red II

Larry Bell has exploited the transparency and reflectivity of glass to great effect since the beginning of his career, when he inserted a square piece of glass into a painting and titled it Ghost Box (1962).  Pacific Red II (2017)

Pacific Red II

Pacific Red II

Over the years, Bell has developed coating and laminating techniques in order to tint his sculptures or imbue them with metallic or smoky finishes.

Pacific Red II

Pacific Red II

Here on the Whitney Museum 5th floor outdoor terrace, Bell has installed Pacific Red II (2017), a work consisting of six laminated glass cubes, each measuring six-by-eight feet, and enclosing another six-by-four foot glass box.

Pacific Red II

Pacific Red II

The multiple surface interplay and respond to their urban surroundings, when glass towers abound.

Pacific Red II

Pacific Red II

Read more about the painstakingly brutal installation process of Pacific Red II, and see a video, at Find Your Seen Dot Com.

Pacific Red II