Tag Archive | 1976

Eye On Design: Glass Armchair by Shiro Kuramata

Glass Armchair
Photographed By Gail in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

In the mid-to-late 20th century, an atmosphere of innovation and a desire to question the tenets of modernism led some designers to explore a variety of ways in which to shape space. American Architect and Designer Alexander Hayden Girard utilized color and pattern in textiles, particularly in this colorful abstract, or folk art-inspired work for Herman Miller.

Glass Armchair at Albertz Benda
Photographed at Albertz Benda Gallery with Robot Cabinet By Ettore Sottsass

By 1970, Japanese Architect and Interior Designer  Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) was introducing alternative materials such as acrylic and industrial plate glass into his furniture. Utilizing a newly developed adhesive, Kuramata achieved material and visual minimalism with this Glass Armchair (1976). Flat planes of glass are bonded together along their edges, without mounts or screws, to create a functional chair that seems simultaneously visible and invisible. The transparent form invites users to question notions of materiality, utility and comfort.

Glass Armchair
Photographed in the Met Breuer (September 2017)

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Peter Saul, de Kooning’s Woman With Bicycle

De Kooning's Woman with Bicycle
Photos By Gail

In the mid-1970s, after skewering American political, social and cultural; mores with his work, Peter Saul (b. 1934) took aim at the art world. Saul executed a number of parody responses to Willem de Kooning’s Woman and Bicycle (1952-53, shown below). Here, Saul spoofs de Kooning’s contorted female figure with distortions of his own, rendering the face as a grotesque cartoon and crowding the composition with lurid Day-Glo forms that both draw upon and satirize Surrealist and Pop styles. At once homage and attack, this painting challenges art history, even while claiming Saul’s place within it.

Woman with Bicycle

 Willem de Kooning’s Woman And Bicycle

Photographed in the Whitney Museum in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Portrait of Jamie Wyeth by Andy Warhol

Portrait of Jamie Wyeth
Photo By Gail

This 1976 oil on canvas portrait of artist Jamie Wyeth is one half of a “Portrait Exchange,” which includes a portrait of Warhol done by Wyeth. Warhol’s half of the portrait exchange presents a brooding and handsome young artist, posing as if for a Hollywood head shot or mimicking Wyeth’s own Portrait of John F. Kennedy. The two artists styles could not be more opposite, and yet they each shared a dedicated work ethic.

While Wyeth created many detailed studies of Warhol to compose his panel painting, Warhol prepared by taking numerous Polaroid snapshots of Wyeth — more, he claimed, than for any of his other subjects at the time. Drawn to celebrity and fame, Warhol frequently surrounded himself with young artists for inspiration, and Wyeth’s natural talent and artistic lineage (not to mention, according to Warhol, his “cuteness”) especially appealed to him.

Photographed in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Happy Birthday, Steve Howe!

Guitarist Steve Howe of Yes
Image Source

Yes guitarist (also a member of Asia) Steve Howe was born on this day April 8th, in 1947. The band Yes was a passionate favorite of mine growing up in the seventies. In fact, one of the most crazy fun and highly memorable concerts I’ve attended was the co-headlining concert of Yes with Peter Frampton back in the summer of 1976, which took place before a crowd of 55,000 people at Anaheim Stadium in Southern California. Although he does not enjoy the level of continued buzz as, say, a player like Jimmy Page, to give you an idea of his popularity during Yes’s heyday, Steve was voted Best Overall Guitarist in Guitar Player magazine five years in a row from 1977 to 1981. Below, please enjoy a live clip of Steve playing “The Clap” and also the acoustic ballad “Mood For Day” to hear an example of his one-take perfection. Happy Birthday, Steve!

Happy Birthday, Al Stewart!

Although Freddie Mercury gets to steal a lot of the Birthday thunder for September 5th, today is also the birthday of the great Al Stewart, who was born on this day in 1945. The video above is from a 1976 performance on the British TV show, The Old Grey Whistle Test, by Stewart and his band of the title cut from the album Year of The Cat, a phenomenal song from one of the best albums of the seventies. Enjoy, and Happy Birthday, Al!

Kiss’ Bootprints Immortalized in Concrete

On This Date, February 20th, in 1976: All four original members of Kiss placed their booted footprints in concrete outside of Grauman’s (Now Mann’s) Chinese Theater on Sunset Blvd., in Hollywood.

Frampton Comes Alive! Is Released

Frampton Comes Alive Album Cover Art

On This Date, January 1st  in 1976: Peter Frampton released his breakthrough double live album Frampton Comes Alive! The album would be certified gold less than 8 weeks after its release and go on to sell 6 million copies and is currently the biggest-selling Live rock album in history. Frampton Comes Alive! is definitely an important album in my personal history and, in my opinion, it’s among the best live albums ever released. That record unlocks so many great memories for me from that time in music. I was lucky enough to be one of about 56,000 people to see Frampton in concert (with co-headliners Yes) at California’s Anaheim Stadium back in the lovely summer of 1976, and that was a concert I will never forget.