Tag Archives: cooper hewitt museum

Eye On Design: Model No. 41 Lounge Chair By Alvar Alto

alvar alto 41 lounge chair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Alvar Aalto’s bentwood furniture designs were among the many ground breaking utilitarian items to emerge from the Bauhaus school designers. The Model 41 Bentwood Lounge Chair (1931 – 32), designed for Aalto’s Paimio Sanatorium, demonstrates the radical possibilities of bentwood in its graceful, scrolling form, devoid of right angles and sharp geometry.

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Pink Thing Of The Day: Fernando Laposse’ Cochineal-Dyed Sisal Shade Lamp

cochineal dyed sisal lamp photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

American cochineal, a small parasitic insect that feeds on the prickly pear cactus, was for centuries the source of the most coveted red pigment in the world. Imbued with profound artistic, cultural, and economic significance for indigenous peoples of Mexico and the Andean Highlands of South America, cochineal was transformed into a widely-traded global commodity upon European contact in the 16th century. While historically it was favored for its ability to produce a highly desirable crimson red, the insect’s red carminic acid can yield shades ranging from soft pink to deep purple.
Continue reading Pink Thing Of The Day: Fernando Laposse’ Cochineal-Dyed Sisal Shade Lamp

Eye On Design: Scented 3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes
All Photos By Gail

Inside this glass dome are vessels printed from sugar. The dome has an indented opening, inviting museum visitors to take a whiff of the objects inside; and yes, they smelled like Cotton Candy.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

These pieces were designed by architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello in Oakland, California. The team use 3D printing processes to invent forms with unique tactile qualities.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The two pink candy dishes have rough, grainy surfaces. The first dish resembles a stack of bubbles. At the top, half of one bubble serves as a lid.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The second is a footed, rimmed bowl with a cone-shaped lid, which sits displayed separate from its base.

Photographed as Part of the Emerging Objects Exhibit at The Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

Eye On Design: Eatwell Assistive Tableware By Shao Yao

Red and Yellow Bowls
All Photos by Gail

Color plays a powerful role in Eatwell Assistive Tableware (2015). Designer She Yao’s grandmother lived with Alzheimer’s disease. Her cognitive and sensory impairments caused her to eat less that she should. The Eatwell bowl uses the color blue, which does not appear in food, helping people with Alzheimer’s to distinguish food from the dish.

Yellow Place Setting

On the exteriors of the bowls, the colors red and yellow stimulate appetite. All pieces stand out from the table setting to enhance cognition.

Red Bowl

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Simple Music Player for Dementia Patients

Simple Music Player
Photos By Gail

For patients suffering from dementia, the benefits of listening to music are significant, both for quality of life and for improving cognizance and lucidity.  The design of this Simple Music Player (2014) — a pre-loaded MP3 player — is radically simplified for ease of operation, and it appears non-threatening and recognizably familiar.

Simple Music Player

Once pre-loaded with the individual’s favorite music or an audio book, the user can activate  —  or stop — play by simply lifting the lid.

Designed by Lyndon Owen, Maurice Thompson and Bruce Barnet. Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan as Part of the Exhibit, Access and Ability.