Tag Archive | Cooper Hewitt Museum

Eye On Design: Scented 3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes
All Photos By Gail

Inside this glass dome are vessels printed from sugar. The dome has an indented opening, inviting museum visitors to take a whiff of the objects inside; and yes, they smelled like Cotton Candy.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

These pieces were designed by architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello in Oakland, California. The team use 3D printing processes to invent forms with unique tactile qualities.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The two pink candy dishes have rough, grainy surfaces. The first dish resembles a stack of bubbles. At the top, half of one bubble serves as a lid.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The second is a footed, rimmed bowl with a cone-shaped lid, which sits displayed separate from its base.

Photographed as Part of the Emerging Objects Exhibit at The Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

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Eye On Design: Eatwell Assistive Tableware By Shao Yao

Red and Yellow Bowls
All Photos by Gail

Color plays a powerful role in Eatwell Assistive Tableware (2015). Designer She Yao’s grandmother lived with Alzheimer’s disease. Her cognitive and sensory impairments caused her to eat less that she should. The Eatwell bowl uses the color blue, which does not appear in food, helping people with Alzheimer’s to distinguish food from the dish.

Yellow Place Setting

On the exteriors of the bowls, the colors red and yellow stimulate appetite. All pieces stand out from the table setting to enhance cognition.

Red Bowl

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Simple Music Player for Dementia Patients

Simple Music Player
Photos By Gail

For patients suffering from dementia, the benefits of listening to music are significant, both for quality of life and for improving cognizance and lucidity.  The design of this Simple Music Player (2014) — a pre-loaded MP3 player — is radically simplified for ease of operation, and it appears non-threatening and recognizably familiar.

Simple Music Player

Once pre-loaded with the individual’s favorite music or an audio book, the user can activate  —  or stop — play by simply lifting the lid.

Designed by Lyndon Owen, Maurice Thompson and Bruce Barnet. Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan as Part of the Exhibit, Access and Ability.

 

Eye On Design: Verner Panton’s Heart Cone Chair

Heart Cone Chair
All Photos By Gail

In Verner Panton’s Notes on Color, the Danish designer stated:

“In Kindergarten, one learns to love and use colors. Later on, at school and in life, one learns something called taste. For most people, this means limiting their use of colors.”

Heart Cone Chair

The design career of Verner Panton (19261998) reached its first peak toward the end of the 1950s. With a furniture series based on simple geometric shapes, Panton anticipated elements of Pop Art, while also emulating the elegance of Scandinavian Modernism in the execution of the bases.

Heart Cone Chair

The most famous designs from this series are the Cone Chair and the Heart Cone Chair (1959). The Heart Cone Chair takes its name from its heart-shaped silhouette. The extended wings of the backrest are reminiscent of Mickey Mouse ears, but can also be interpreted as a contemporary development of the classic wingback chair.

Heart Cone Chair

Photographed at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Eye On Design: Nobody’s Perfect Chair By Gaetano Pesce

Nobody's Perfect Chair
Photos By Gail

Gaetano Pesce’s playful Nobody’s Perfect chair (2001) embodies diversity within standardization. Following simple guidelines, the maker pours pigmented resin into a mold to achieve a random quantity and mix of colors. The back of this chair presents an excellent example of the phenomena of Pareidolia, which encouragee you to see an image resembling a face.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The liquid resin is hardened into the furniture’s components, which are later assembled with pegs.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The ‘face’ that the back of this chair resembles is quite fun!

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Glass Armchair by Shiro Kuramata

Glass Armchair
Photographed By Gail in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

In the mid-to-late 20th century, an atmosphere of innovation and a desire to question the tenets of modernism led some designers to explore a variety of ways in which to shape space. American Architect and Designer Alexander Hayden Girard utilized color and pattern in textiles, particularly in this colorful abstract, or folk art-inspired work for Herman Miller.

Glass Armchair at Albertz Benda
Photographed at Albertz Benda Gallery with Robot Cabinet By Ettore Sottsass

By 1970, Japanese Architect and Interior Designer  Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) was introducing alternative materials such as acrylic and industrial plate glass into his furniture. Utilizing a newly developed adhesive, Kuramata achieved material and visual minimalism with this Glass Armchair (1976). Flat planes of glass are bonded together along their edges, without mounts or screws, to create a functional chair that seems simultaneously visible and invisible. The transparent form invites users to question notions of materiality, utility and comfort.

Glass Armchair
Photographed in the Met Breuer (September 2017)

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Eye On Design: Slice Armchair By Mathias Bengtsson

Slice Chair
All Photos By Gail

The undulating form of Mathias Bengtsson’s plywood Slice Armchair is inspired by cutting-edge technology and organic forms found in nature. Bengtsson initiated the design in 1999 and originally executed it in clay. He then used a computer to analyze the shape and precision-cut hundreds of plywood slices, each a unique shape and just a few millimeters thick, which he stacked and laminated to form the sculptural chair. The result is a contemporary take on furniture made from traditional material, combing high-tech manufacturing methods and handcrafting.

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Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Slice Chair Detail
Slice Armchair Detail