Tag Archive | Eye on Design

Eye On Design: Anatonmy1 Ensemble By Kei Kagami

Anatomy1 Ensemble
All Photos By Gail

Kei Kagami is a Japanese architect and designer living in London whose conceptual, avant-garde designs have been referred to as Torture Couture for their integration of mechanical elements and contraptions. What’s closer to the truth is that they are, like the haute couture of a designer like Alexander McQueen, wearable works of art.

Anatomy1 Ensemble

Anatomy, biology, ecology and futurism combine in his more surreal designs in which glass tubes, vials and magnifying glasses are used to break the traditional boundaries and tackle themes of transformation, and a garment’s interaction with the wearer. Using an eclectic mix of materials such as silk, lether, metaol, plastic an glass, Kagami’s conceptual pieces are always informed by his study of architecture.

Anatomy1 Side View

The Anatomy1 Ensemble (2007) was originally featured in the Museum at FIT’s 2008 show, Gothic: Dark Glamour, but it can also currently be seen as part of Exhibitionism: 50 Years of The Museum at FIT, on view through April 20th, 2019.

Anatomy1 Ensemble

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Eye On Design: Fredrikson Stallard, Armchair Species II

Species II Installation View
All Photos By Gail

This bright red armchair that looks like it was chiseled from a boulder is actually sculpted from polyurethane foam and upholstered in a brushed velvet-like polyester, making it quite a comfortable place to rest. This chair (Species II circa 2015) is part of the Species series by London-based design duo Fredrikson Stallard, following their study in evolution through the media of furniture design. The designers claim that the chair was “created with a brute force that is at odds with ideas of comfort or human contact, yet so inviting by the nature of its materials.” I think anyone can see what they are getting at.

Species II Armchair

The pieces are further described as “amorphous structures, elements of sculpted mass, chaotic energy, finished in shades of red, as for Fredrikson Stallard these are the colors of life and death. Something along the lines of – “It couldn’t happen here, but then it did.” This is very much furniture, but not as we know it.

Fredrikson Stallard, Armchair Species III

Fredrikson Stallard’s Armchair Species II (2015) was Photographed in the Booth for the David Gill Gallery (London) at the Salon Art and Design, NYC, in November of 2018. Limited Edition, Direct Inquiries to David Gill Gallery Dot Com.

Species II Installation View

Eye On Design: Cast Glass Chairs By Marc Newson

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
All Photos By Gail

From the outset of his singular career, designer Marc Newson has pursued parallel activities in limited and mass production of functional design objects. Revisiting his roots as a jeweler and silversmith in an exhibition at Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea, Newson explores increasingly rare decorative techniques at an unconventionally large, even unprecedented, scale.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Newson’s Cast Glass Chairs (2017), made in the Czech Republic, are continuous symmetrical forms comprised of two hollow quarter-spheres. The boldly colored upper halves rest on clear bases, which absorb some of the reflected hues in their clouded interiors, an effect that subtly changes depending on the viewer’s vantage point.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
When You Just Get Tired of Waiting for that Final Person to Move Out Of Your Way

Photographed in the Gagosian Gallery, Located at 522 West 21st Street, Chelsea Gallery District, NYC· The Chairs are on View in the Gallery as Part of a Larger Exhibition of Newson’s Limited-Edition Furniture and Artworks, Through February 20th, 2019.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Eye On Design: Crocodile Banquette By Claude LaLanne

Crocodile Banquette Front View
All Photos By Gail

Claude Lalanne (born 1924) is a French designer known for her eccentric works, which are often animal themed. She also worked with her late husband, Francois-Xavier Lalannne (19272008), under the name Les Lalannes.

Crocodile Banquette

Claude Lalanne’s gilt-bronze Banquette Crocodile is one of the designer’s most sought-after pieces, the realism of its reptiles coming as a result of a trip to the Paris zoo in 1972. It seems the designer had envisioned the creation of such a piece for quite some time but was in need of an actual crocodile upon which to base it.

Crocodile Banquette Rear View
Banquette, Rear View

As the story goes, Lalanne decided to put in a request to the city’s zookeepers for the remains of a crocodile, should one happen to expire of old age when nature took its course. And so a crocodile did pass away and, shortly thereafter, Lalanne went to collect her specimen in the company of fellow artist Niki de Saint Phalle.

Crocodile Banquette Installation View
Installation view with Claude LaLanne-designed Mirror and Candle Holders

Since then, the highly textured crocodile motif has taken shape in a number of her works, ranging from chandeliers to tables and chairs as well as the bench, which was designed in 2006, and cast in 2007 in an edition of eight with four artist’s proofs.  Most of these pieces have been sold at auction at Christie’s and Sotheby’s for anywhere from $500,000 to $1 Million each.

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 509 West 27th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, NYC, Where You Can See This Bench and Other Works By Les Lalannes on Exhibit Through March 9th, 2019.

Eye On Design: Angry POTUS Microwave Cleaner

Angry POTUS in Packaging
 All Photos By Gail

Are you as sick and tired of looking at the likeness of He Who Will Not Be Named as you are of having to clean your dirty microwave oven?  I feel you. Recently, it fell to me to scrub exploded ham off of the interior of the office microwave (don’t get me started) and that was all kinds of not fun. As as much as I dislike being exposed to the face of the one I refer to only as Dump, let me tell you about the Angry POTUS Microwave Cleaner, where two evils come together for a good cause: getting dried crud off of your microwave’s walls while poking fun at the Dump. Win Win!

Angry POTUS and Packaging
“This Is The Only Time I Do Not Suck!”

Created by the hilarious folks over at New Metro DesignAngry POTUS Microwave Cleaner eliminates the need for elbow grease from one of your kitchen’s more unpleasant tasks. Even better, Angry POTUS will Make Your Microwave Clean Again without the use of any harmful chemicals. Just add vinegar and water, then microwave for 3 minutes: Et Voila! The hot steam will come out of POTUS’ head (just like in real life), softening microwave dirt and stains for easy cleaning! Step-by-step instruction for using Angry POTUS, which are printed on the back of the box, are quite easy to follow!

Angry POTUS Microwave Cleaner Packaging

Angry POTUS is dishwasher safe! Angry POTUS hat is not included.

Angry POTUS Microwave Cleaner

This is not Fake News: Angry POTUS Microwave Cleaner is available for just $14.95 from Amazon. Click Here to get yours today!

Photographed at the International Home + Housewares Preview Press Event tomorrow in New York City.

Eye On Design: Ore Streams Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Installation View 1
All Photos By Gail

Seemingly random bits of e-waste make up the Ore Streams collection of office furniture, designed by Italian duo Formafantasma.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma

Cabinet (2017)  is a clear glass-encased filling cabinet created from up-cycled aluminium computer cases embellished with a digital print of the surface of Mars, a reference to the extra-terrestrial origins of gold, which is widely thought to have arrived on earth via a meteorite shower.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Front Detail
Cabinet, Front Drawer Detail

Formafantasma’s Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin created cabinet and accompanying furniture series as part of their Ore Streams project, a two-year study into the current state of electronic waste recycling that proposes new approaches for designers working on gadgets. The furniture is designed as a poetic response to the findings.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Detail
Cabinet, Side and Rear Detail

The pastel-hued metallic objects incorporate decontextualised bits of electronic waste, like the casings from iPhones and laptop keyboards. One cubicle features a pigeonhole formed from a microwave, while a rubbish bin is lined with gold scavenged from circuit boards.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma

The duo chose objects that were familiar within the office, but made them slightly odd and unfamiliar. In addition to the filing cabinet, the collection includes a table, rubbish bin, two cubicles, a desk, chair, lamp and shelf, all made primarily of dead stock.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Installation View 2

Photographed in the Giustini / Stagetti Booth at the Salon Art and Design, at the NYC Armory in November of 2018.

Eye On Design: Beaded Vest By Marcus Amerman

Beaded Vest
All Photos By Gail

This elaborately Beaded Vest (2013) was inspired by the catalogs for the Burpee Seed Company, an online purveyor of gardening supplies. Whereas much Native American beadwork features flat, abstract designs, Marcus Amerman (Choctaw, Born 1959) stitches each bead individually, alternating colors to create three-dimensional effects. The result is vivid imagery that leaps off the surface and defies our expectations of the medium.

Beaded Vest

Although the realism and commercial source of Amerman’s imagery are nontraditional, floral imagery has a long history within Native North American beadwork as an art form and a symbol of cultural resilience. Floral imagery emerged as a mainstay of beadwork during the fur trade, when beaded horse gear, bags, and clothing found a ready market among non-Native traders and settlers. As Native groups were disrupted and displaced by expansion, disease and war, floral imagery retained symbolic meaning known only to tribes, forming a visual language capable of surviving the destructive forces of empire.

Beaded Vest

Photographed in the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles, CA.