Tag Archive | furniture

Eye On Design: Cast Glass Chairs By Marc Newson

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
All Photos By Gail

From the outset of his singular career, designer Marc Newson has pursued parallel activities in limited and mass production of functional design objects. Revisiting his roots as a jeweler and silversmith in an exhibition at Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea, Newson explores increasingly rare decorative techniques at an unconventionally large, even unprecedented, scale.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Newson’s Cast Glass Chairs (2017), made in the Czech Republic, are continuous symmetrical forms comprised of two hollow quarter-spheres. The boldly colored upper halves rest on clear bases, which absorb some of the reflected hues in their clouded interiors, an effect that subtly changes depending on the viewer’s vantage point.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
When You Just Get Tired of Waiting for that Final Person to Move Out Of Your Way

Photographed in the Gagosian Gallery, Located at 522 West 21st Street, Chelsea Gallery District, NYC· The Chairs are on View in the Gallery as Part of a Larger Exhibition of Newson’s Limited-Edition Furniture and Artworks, Through February 20th, 2019.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Eye On Design: Crocodile Banquette By Claude LaLanne

Crocodile Banquette Front View
All Photos By Gail

Claude Lalanne (born 1924) is a French designer known for her eccentric works, which are often animal themed. She also worked with her late husband, Francois-Xavier Lalannne (19272008), under the name Les Lalannes.

Crocodile Banquette

Claude Lalanne’s gilt-bronze Banquette Crocodile is one of the designer’s most sought-after pieces, the realism of its reptiles coming as a result of a trip to the Paris zoo in 1972. It seems the designer had envisioned the creation of such a piece for quite some time but was in need of an actual crocodile upon which to base it.

Crocodile Banquette Rear View
Banquette, Rear View

As the story goes, Lalanne decided to put in a request to the city’s zookeepers for the remains of a crocodile, should one happen to expire of old age when nature took its course. And so a crocodile did pass away and, shortly thereafter, Lalanne went to collect her specimen in the company of fellow artist Niki de Saint Phalle.

Crocodile Banquette Installation View
Installation view with Claude LaLanne-designed Mirror and Candle Holders

Since then, the highly textured crocodile motif has taken shape in a number of her works, ranging from chandeliers to tables and chairs as well as the bench, which was designed in 2006, and cast in 2007 in an edition of eight with four artist’s proofs.  Most of these pieces have been sold at auction at Christie’s and Sotheby’s for anywhere from $500,000 to $1 Million each.

Photographed in the Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located at 509 West 27th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, NYC, Where You Can See This Bench and Other Works By Les Lalannes on Exhibit Through March 9th, 2019.

Eye On Design: Ore Streams Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Installation View 1
All Photos By Gail

Seemingly random bits of e-waste make up the Ore Streams collection of office furniture, designed by Italian duo Formafantasma.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma

Cabinet (2017)  is a clear glass-encased filling cabinet created from up-cycled aluminium computer cases embellished with a digital print of the surface of Mars, a reference to the extra-terrestrial origins of gold, which is widely thought to have arrived on earth via a meteorite shower.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Front Detail
Cabinet, Front Drawer Detail

Formafantasma’s Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin created cabinet and accompanying furniture series as part of their Ore Streams project, a two-year study into the current state of electronic waste recycling that proposes new approaches for designers working on gadgets. The furniture is designed as a poetic response to the findings.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Detail
Cabinet, Side and Rear Detail

The pastel-hued metallic objects incorporate decontextualised bits of electronic waste, like the casings from iPhones and laptop keyboards. One cubicle features a pigeonhole formed from a microwave, while a rubbish bin is lined with gold scavenged from circuit boards.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma

The duo chose objects that were familiar within the office, but made them slightly odd and unfamiliar. In addition to the filing cabinet, the collection includes a table, rubbish bin, two cubicles, a desk, chair, lamp and shelf, all made primarily of dead stock.

Filing Cabinet By Formafantasma Installation View 2

Photographed in the Giustini / Stagetti Booth at the Salon Art and Design, at the NYC Armory in November of 2018.

Eye On Design: Presence – Absence Table By Germans Ermics

Presence - Absence Table
All Photos By Gail

Amsterdam-based designer Germans Ermics has worked extensively with frosted, ombre and colored glass in his furniture design studio. The Presence – Absence Table expands on his ideas with a design made from  hardened laminated glass mirror with graduation from 100% Mirror to 100% Red Glass. It is really quire stunning.

Presence - Absence Table

Presence – Absence was originally created in collaboration with Iskos – Berlin for the Side by Side Outside SE exhibition at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in 2017.  A statement on the table is below:

“The clearest way to perceive and define the world is through negation, through opposites:

We understand the meaning of light when it becomes dark; we first understand what our parents mean for us when they are gone; the presence of loved ones is truly grasped in their absence.
Presence and Absence walk together – Side by Side – as inseparable as day and night”

Presence - Absence Table

Photographed at The Salon Art & Design in NYC. Limited Edition of 8 Pieces, Available from Galerie Maria Wettergren, Paris.

Eye On Design: Petite Fleur Tables By Hélène de Saint Lager

Petite Fleur Tables By Helene De Saint Lager
All Photos By Gail

Hélène de Saint Lager is a French artist and sculptor, based in Paris, who is particularly known for her furniture made of resin. This trio of Petite Fleur Tables are a perfect exmaple of her works, of which no two are alike. A Saint Lager table is typically made over the course of a week, using a hollowed-out bed of sand. The artist forms that hollow to represent the mass of the table when it is filled. A canvas sheet then lines the void before Saint Leger pours a layer of resin a couple of inches deep onto it. Her next task is to decide how industrial dyes lend effects of opacity or transparency, depth or brilliance.

Petite Fleur Tables Detail
Table Surface, Detail

Metallic strips or iridescent drops or streaks might be added as the material is built up in each stage, with 24 hours needed for each layer to cure. Sometimes, mother of pearl or broken ceramics are added, and Saint Lager encourages personal effects to be entombed in her bespoke designs.

Petite Fleur Tables By Helene De Saint Lager

Photographed at The Salon Art and Design. Available from Twenty First Gallery in NYC.

Eye On Design: Bespoke Amber Chest of Drawers By Kam Tin

Amber Chest of Drawers
All Photos By Gail

I saw many, many breathtakingly beautiful things at The Salon Art and Design show at the Park Avenue Armory, and one of most unusual items, which I am sure I will never forget, was this three-drawer dresser by designer Kam Tin, which is covered on three sides in meticulously curated pieces of genuine Baltic Amber.

Amber Chest of Drawers

Have you ever seen anything like that? For this dresser, which Tin creates to-order so that no two are alike, the natural amber pieces are polished and mounted on the dresser’s wooden frame, fitted with brass legs, and topped with a plate of Italian tinted glass. The piece measures 27.5ʺW × 19.7ʺD × 31.4ʺH.

Amber Chest of Drawers Detail
Amber Drawer Surface Detail

Each piece of amber was hand-selected for its color and inclusions. This chest of drawers  has a retail price tag of $57,000.

Amber Chest of Drawers

Designed by Kam Tin for Maison Rapin at Decaso, Paris, France.

Pink Thing Of The Day: Discarded Pink Desk

Discarded Pink Desk
All Photos By Gail

The only reason I happened to walk by this dismantled Pink Desk, abandoned at the curb of an East Village side street waiting to be carried off to the landfill, is that it was a public holiday and I had an appointment with a plate of Perogi at Veselka. If you look closely, you’ll see a pair of horn-shaped protuberances peaking out from behind the drawer, which has been pulled out and laid on the desk surface, and you can extrapolate that this was once a young girl’s Vanity table that is now missing its mirror.

Discarded Pink Desk

I bet it was well-loved by its previous owner. Maybe, after I went on my way, someone picked it up and took it home to make a few repairs and give it a new life. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

Eye On Design: Furniture By Marc Camille Chaimowicz

Room By Marc Camille Chaimowicz
All Photos By Gail

Marc Camille Chaimowicz (b. 1947) is a London-based, cross-disciplinary contemporary artist whose works challenge the categorical divisions between art and design. His recent career retrospect at the Jewish Museum (which was the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in the United States) transformed the entire second floor of the former Warburg family mansion from an exhibit showcase into a series of fantasy tableaus pristinely curated with unique and whimsical home furnishings and décor. This room was my favorite. Let’s take a closer look at the pieces that make up this dream-like living room set.

Give and Take Sofa and Rope Vase

Blue Velvet Give and Take Sofa and Pink Glazed Ceramic Rope Vase.

Maquette for Give and Take Sofa

Maquette for Give and Take Sofa

Stainless Steel Magazine Rack

Stainless Steel Magazine Rack with Diamonds Cut Outs

Pink Rope Vase

Rope Vase

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Your Place or Mine, at the Jewish Museum.

Room 2

Items Shown Left to Right : One Meter Lamp (2016), Glazed Ceramic Rope Vase (2014) Give and Take Velvet Sofa (1994) Stainless Steel Magazine Rack (2014)

Eye On Design: “Japanned” Bureau Cabinet Circa 1720

Japanned Cabinet
All Photos By Gail

This spectacular bureau cabinet reflects the European fascination with Japanese and Chinese luxury goods in the early eighteenth century. The bright red surfaced imitated Asian lacquer, which was made from materials not available in Europe.

Cabinet Top Detail

The motifs evoke the people and sights of the Far East, but they reflect the limited knowledge and stereotyped views that Europeans held of these distant countries. at the time the cabinet was made, this technique of using imitation lacquer was called “Japanning.” The original owner may have displayed small Asian porcelains in the upper niches of the cabinet.

Japanned Cabinet Detail 1

Japanned Cabinet Detail 2

Japanned Cabinet
Photographed in the Clark Institute in Williamstown, MA

Eye On Design: Verner Panton’s Heart Cone Chair

Heart Cone Chair
All Photos By Gail

In Verner Panton’s Notes on Color, the Danish designer stated:

“In Kindergarten, one learns to love and use colors. Later on, at school and in life, one learns something called taste. For most people, this means limiting their use of colors.”

Heart Cone Chair

The design career of Verner Panton (19261998) reached its first peak toward the end of the 1950s. With a furniture series based on simple geometric shapes, Panton anticipated elements of Pop Art, while also emulating the elegance of Scandinavian Modernism in the execution of the bases.

Heart Cone Chair

The most famous designs from this series are the Cone Chair and the Heart Cone Chair (1959). The Heart Cone Chair takes its name from its heart-shaped silhouette. The extended wings of the backrest are reminiscent of Mickey Mouse ears, but can also be interpreted as a contemporary development of the classic wingback chair.

Heart Cone Chair

Photographed at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.