Tag Archives: mad

Eye On Design: Pomegranate Grotto Console By Chris Schanck

pomegranate grotto console photo by gail worley
Grotto Console with Twin Stone Candelabra (All Photos By Gail)

You’ve seen the ‘otherworldly’ furniture designs of Chris Schanck in this space before, and I’m sure you’ll agree that they never fails to turn heads. Whether you’re already a fan or on the cusp of becoming one,  get ready to be dazzled by many more of Schank’s maverick designs in the coming months as we showcase selections from Off World, the artist’s current and long-running exhibit at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. Among the numerous stand-out pieces in Off World is this wildly successful experiment with a bold Pomegranate red color, as seen on the above console, which is part of the designer’s Grotto series. Continue reading Eye On Design: Pomegranate Grotto Console By Chris Schanck

Eye On Design: Merino Wool Felt Long Coat By Tanis S’eitlin

merino felt wool red and black long coat
All Photos By Gail

Combining traditional references with a contemporary aesthetic, this Merino Wool Felt Long Coat (2017) pays homage to the matrilineal social structure of the Tlingit tribe, and specifically to the artist’s mother and great- grandmother. Artist Tanis S’eitlin found inspiration in the Chilkat robe, a type of Tlingit regalia, that her mother made toward the end of her life.
Continue reading Eye On Design: Merino Wool Felt Long Coat By Tanis S’eitlin

Margin for Error: Glass Crib and Cradle By Beth Lipman

margin for error glass crib and cradle photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

In Beth Lipman’s Margin For Error (2014) an infant Crib and an adult Cradle are oriented to evoke the universal journey from birth to death. The crib tilts downward, sinking slowly into the floor, propelling its inhabitant toward childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age, at which point the cradle awaits occupation.

Continue reading Margin for Error: Glass Crib and Cradle By Beth Lipman

Modern Art Monday Presents: Patti Warashina, Gold Finger

patti warashina goldfinger photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Patti Warashina’s Kilns series subversively undermined the macho “cult of the kiln”: a phrase used to coin the sexist culture that surrounded kiln-building during the mid-twentieth century. As a ceramics student at the University of Washington, Warashina observed that kiln-building lessons were directed towards men, while surface decoration was the jurisdiction of women.

gold finger photo by gail worley

In response,  she created a pointed feminist critique, taking symbolic control over the image. Gold Finger (1973) can be read as a female stereotype imposed on a male one, with its shiny gilt decorative surface and two protruding fingers, their nails painted bright red. Fairy-tale depictions of beanstalks and peas further emphasize the playful yet gendered imagery, exposing problematic conventions.

gold finger photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Circumspect Neckpiece By Kiff Slemmons

circumspect neckpiece photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Kiff Slemmons‘ neckpiece Circumspect (2003) is an object that does what it is and is what it does. Composed of lenses and mirrors collected and categorized for a purpose that the collecting itself reveals, it is both a tool of taxonomic assessment and a record of a taxonomic class of useful and evocative things.

circumspect detail photo by gail worley

Denying the role of jewelry as something only to be looked at, it meets and counters the gaze — returning agency to those being seen. It also asks us to emulate what it facilitates: the art of careful looking as a way of understanding.

circumspect neckpiece 2 photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan.